Recent Submissions

  • PIPER NIGRUM IN ALZHEIMER'S AND COGNITIVE DYSFUNCTION: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    Jones-Asgill, Michael; Department of Kinesiology and Health Science; College of Nursing; Langley-Brady, Dawn; Augusta University (2019-02-13)
    Every 65 seconds, someone in the U.S develops Alzheimer's dementia. Alzheimer's is a chronic brain disorder affecting approximately five million Americans. Alzheimer's is an irreversible form of dementia that progressively worsens memory and simple cognitive abilities. There is no known cure for Alzheimer's. Current treatment includes pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches (e.g. aromatherapy). Aromatherapy is the use of essential oils from aromatic plants and is being explored in cognition studies.Piper nigrum or black pepper has cognitive-enhancing properties. The purpose of this project was to review the literature regarding the use of black pepper in Alzheimer's. PubMed, CINAHL, Ovid Medicine, and ProQuest databases were searched for peer-reviewed journal articles written in English and published since 2014 with the following keywords: Cognitive, essential oil,Piper nigrum, aromatherapy and Alzheimer's. Nine articles were found that met the literature review criteria three animal and six human studies. These studies established the effectiveness of black pepper essential oil for both improving function and reducing cognitive decline. These studies may open doors for aromatherapy research in Alzheimer's. Despite efficacy, the preferred administration method (inhalation or topical) is unclear.Piper nigrum essential oil can potentially change Alzheimer's patients disease trajectory and should be further studied.
  • LAVANDULA ANGUSTIFOLIA USE FOR DYSMENORRHEA IN YOUNG WOMEN: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    Nelson, Brenda; College of Science and Mathematics; College of Nursing; Langley-Brady, Dawn; Augusta University (2019-02-13)
    Dysmenorrhea effects 20% of women causing missed school and work days and interferes with daily life. Dysmenorrhea is caused by menstrual uterine contractions which may result in pain, nausea, vomiting and headaches. Many women utilize pharmacological symptom management, but experience side effects such as edema, libido reduction and increased symptom severity. Aromatherapy is a holistic non-pharmacological approach to symptom reduction. Aromatherapy is the use of essential oils via inhalation or topical application to relieve pain, stress and more.� The purpose of this project is to review the literature surrounding�Lavandula angustifolia�(lavender) and dysmenorrhea to give a foundation for future research. PubMed, TRIP, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for peer-reviewed journals articles in English and published within the last 10 years with the following keywords: dysmenorrhea, lavender, aromatherapy and human. The literature review resulted in six articles meeting inclusion criteria. These articles established the effectiveness of lavender in reducing dysmenorrhea pain in the first three days of menstruation, through inhalation and abdominal application. Lavender essential oil is also effective in reducing nausea and headaches resulting in an alternative for women experiencing dysmenorrhea. Aromatherapy has fewer risks than pharmacological and surgical approaches to dysmenorrhea management and should be studied further.
  • Role of Aging in the Expression of Pain-related Depression of Nesting in Mice

    McPherson, Sarah; Department of Physiological and Technological Nursing (Augusta University, 2018-05)
  • Role of Aging in The Expression of Pain-related Depression of Nesting in Mice

    McPherson, Sarah; Patton, Tadd; Hunter, Lance; Department of Psychological Sciences; Miller, Laurence; Department of Psychological Sciences; Augusta University (2018-02-12)
    Pain stimulates some behaviors (e.g. flinching, vocalization), and depresses others (e.g. locomotor activity, social interactions). Pain-related depression of behavior is a key diagnostic criteria and treatment target in clinical settings, but preclinical research has primarily focused on pain-related stimulation of behavior. The present study aims to improve understanding of the impact of aging on pain-related depression of behavior by examining pain-related depression of nesting behavior in male ICR mice. The mice are placed in a cage containing nesting material, and the rate of consolidation of that material is determinedwith a schedule of data collection intervals. The impact of pain stimuli and analgesic drugs on nesting behavior are then determined. Previous studies have shown that physiologically-relevant pain stimuli depress nesting behavior, and clinically-relevant analgesics block pain-related depression of nesting. The present study will examine the role of aging as a determinant of the expression of pain-related depression of behavior by comparing pain-related depression of nesting by three age groups.
  • Perceptions of Nurses Regarding a Nurse Residency Program

    Shaver, Chelsey; Department of Physiological and Technological Nursing (2016-03)
    Background: The turnover rate among newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs) is a healthcare issue with reported rates as high as 61% within the first year of practicing. Job satisfaction and organizational factors impact retention rates per recent studies. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of a nurse residency program (NRP) among newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs) related to job satisfaction and retention. Methods: The Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience survey was used to evaluate satisfaction of a NRP among NLRNs. This survey was distributed to 72 of the 88 nurse residents after they completed the nurse residency program on the NRU. Forty-three surveys were returned and 38 were included in the study. Results: The turnover rate of the 88 NLRNs who started the NRP was 8% after 20 months. Respondents reported overall satisfaction with the NRP in areas of skill level, job stress, work relationships and the organization. Areas noted for improvement included increased preparation for workload management and increased skill practice in code responses, IV insertion, and tracheostomy management. Conclusion/Recommendations for Practice: By improving job satisfaction, this NRP assisted the facility in maintaining turnover rates lower than those reported by evidence-based research. Participants reported more time on their home units would improve acclamation to workload management, though a tiered, increased patient load with increased acuity.
  • Reducing Tobacco Dependence: Evaluation of Tobacco Cessation Education on a Stroke Unit

    Cook-McKnight, Crystal; Department of Physiological and Technological Nursing (2016-03)
    Background: Tobacco use is the number one preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States.It is a leading cause of cerebrovascular disease, and tobacco users are three times more likely to have a stroke compared to non-tobacco users. Georgia is among the highest rates of tobacco use and stroke in the U.S. Evidence based tobacco cessation interventions are available; however, they are are underutilized by clinicians. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate if a brief educational intervention related to tobacco cesssation interventions compared to the current practice impacted the attitudes, beliefs, intentions and knowledge of tobacco cessation counseling of healthcare professionals on a stroke unit.Methods: A 45 minute presentation based on a guideline with the most current recommendations was provided to clinicians on a stroke unit. A pre-post survey evaluated the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and intentions of 29 nurses and a respiratory therapist related to tobacco cessation interventions in a tertiary care hospital in Georgia.Results:Tobacco counseling and treatment knowledge increased significantly from pre- to post-training. Average correct answers post survey was 76% versus the pre survey of 24%. Attitudes, beliefs and intentions were moderately correlated to improved self confidence. Conclusion: Overall, healthcare professionals exhibited improved tobacco cessation knowledge. Attitudes, beliefs and intentions were moderately impacted.
  • The Effects of Individual Factors and Health Promotion During Pregnancy on Maternal-Infant Health

    Hatmaker, Debra D; Department of Physiological and Technical Nursing (1993-09)
    The purpose of this study was to examine selected individual factors which may influence the pregnant woman's engagement in health-promotion behaviors and maternal-infant health. The theoretical framework evolved from the Health Promotion Model(Pender, 1987) and the cognitive-transactional theory of stress and coping (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984). A convenience sample of 63 low-risk and 53 high-risk pregnant women was selected for this study. The concept of high-risk in this study was narrowed to those women undergoing home uterine activity monitoring who were at risk for preterm delivery. Individual factors included self-efficacy, degree of threat, perceived social support, and perceived health status. The construct of reported health-promoting behaviors was used to describe an active approach toward improved well-being. As outcome measures of health, three concepts were used as an overall index of maternal-infant health: subjective wellbeing (positive and negative affect), maternal weight gain, and infant birth weight. Regression analyses revealed that women who reported fewer negative health symptoms and a higher number of health behaviors reported higher positive affect. The change in positive affect over time for the high-risk group reflected an increase in positive mood and social engagement. A high-risk status, high degree of threat, high perceived conflict, and a higher number of negative health symptoms were predictive of higher negative affect. Negative mood and anxiety for the high-risk group were reflected in their higher scores. The high-risk group felt greater threat from their pregnancy status, had a more negative outlook for their pregnancy, and felt less in control of the situation than did the low-risk group. While the two groups did not differ on overall reported health-promoting behaviors, the high-risk group scored significantly higher on health responsibility and lower on exercise than the low-risk group. Significant implications for nurses working with pregnant women and their families include: awareness of the need for prenatal assessment of anxiety and the meaning of the highrisk label, the need for improved risk assessment, continued education regarding expected physical and psychological changes during pregnancy, and education regarding positive health behaviors.
  • Self-Regulation Intervention by Telephone to Reduce Weight and Blood Pressure in Overweight Women with Elevated Blood Pressure

    Fluker, Janet G; Department of Physiological and Technological Nursing (2005-05)
    Excess weight and increases in blood pressure are two biological risk factors that can be modified with changes in lifestyle behaviors. Lifestyle modification involving nutrition and activity level remain the cornerstone of prevention and treatment for individuals who are overweight and hypertensive. Self-regulation intervention delivered by telephone is designed to assist individuals in adopting lifestyle modifications to lose weight and reduce blood pressure. The purpose of this randomized clinical study was to test the effectiveness o f a telephone-delivered self-regulation intervention in reducing weight and systolic blood pressure in overweight women with elevated blood pressure. Secondary aims were to test the effectiveness of self-regulation intervention on weight self-efficacy, exercise selfefficacy and health status. Sixty-two overweight women with elevated blood pressure were randomly assigned to either five weeks of telephone-delivered self-regulation intervention (n=31) or usual care control group (n=31). Repeated measurements for outcome variables occurred at Baseline, 6-weeks and 10-weeks. Two-way ANOVA with one repeated factor demonstrated a significant interaction for weight x group (F= 8.79, df = 1/60 p = .004), with individuals in the self-regulation intervention group having a significantly greater weight loss as compared to individuals in the usual care group. Examining weight self-efficacy x group differences there was a significant difference in weight self-efficacy (F= 12.39, df = 1/60 p = .001) with individuals in the self-regulation intervention having a greater increase as compared to individuals in the usual care control group. There was a significant main effect for systolic blood pressure (F = 9.00, df 2/120, p < 01) and health status (F= .4.94, d f = 1/60, p = .03). There was no significant interaction for systolic blood pressure x group, exercise self-efficacy x group, or health status x group. These results support the use of telephone-delivered self-regulation intervention in the primary care setting as a more effective means than usual care to assist overweight women with elevated blood pressure in losing weight and increasing weight self-efficacy. Self-regulation was shown to be effective in lowering blood pressure and improving health status but it did not prove to be more effective than usual care.
  • Incentive Spirometry Use Following Abdominal Surgery

    Barry, James; Marsden, Stacy; Stewart, Jill; College of Nursing (2013-04-18)
    The literature review was performed to answer the question, “For post-operative abdominal surgery patients does the use of an incentive spirometer reduce the risk of pulmonary complications compared with a regimen of deep breathing exercises?” Determining whether IS or DBE use is more effective could play a significant role in the reduction of morbidity and mortality, improving health outcomes, and reducing health costs following abdominal surgery.
  • Disproving the Fear - Autism Linked Vaccinations

    Donovan, Christy; House, Rachel; Walden, Alysa; College of Nursing (2013-04-16)
    This literature review was performed to answer the question, are children who are immunized as infants compared to children who are not immunized as infants at increased risk of developing autism?