• Time Cost of Standard Nursing Screens

      Migdal, Victoria; Harper, Katie; Haqqani, Nazish; Janiak, Bruce; Department of Emergency Medicine
      Purpose: To determine the time to obtain answers to five-preselected ED nursing triage/assessment questions and convert this time to the monetary cost to the emergency department. Methods: A prospective observational study of ED Registered Nurses performing triage assessments on 200 adults presenting to the ED for medical care. During the triage assessment, the nurse was timed by one of the study authors while the RN asked five pre-selected questions included in their current triage protocol. The time cost of each question was determined by multiplying the time spent asking the question each year by the average hourly wage of our ED RNs. (T x V x S)/3600; where T= average time per question (in seconds), V=annual patient volume, S=average hourly RN wage Results: A total of 200 triage assessments were observed. During these assessments, 130 patients were asked about pneumococcal vaccine status, 161 asked about tetanus vaccine status, 184 asked about medication allergies, 172 about influenza vaccine, and 73 about recent travel. The average time spent per question ranged from 4.4-6.3 seconds. The estimated annual time used to ask these 5 questions in the AUMC ED is 633.98 hrs, which equates to $22189.3 in nursing costs per year. Conclusions: This is a cursory look at the potential monetary and time costs of standardized screening questions in the ED. These values directly affect time and cost efficiency in the ED process and could potentially be redirected to more pertinent patient care. The required screening questions are often unrelated to the patient’s chief complaint and have no impact on the medical management in the ED. Further studies are needed to determine cost effectiveness of required ED screenings.
    • Data Storage, Access, & Security

      Smith, James; School of Computer and Cyber Sciences
    • Opioid Crisis Trends in Georgia: Using Data Management Systems to Better Inform Public Policy

      Sheikh, Nafiz; Tauhidul, Liniya; Medical College of Georgia
      Introduction: The nationwide opioid epidemic is arguably the most consequential public health crisis of the new millennium. Unfortunately, a dearth of medical literature exists analyzing the scope of the epidemic in Georgia. This presentation will investigate trends in fatal opioid overdoses in Georgia using a robust healthcare data management system: Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) WONDER. Methods: Using CDC WONDER, a cohort of all fatal opioid overdoses in Georgia from 1999 – 2017 was obtained (N=10,070). The group was then stratified by race, sex, age group, and overdosed opioid type. Time series analyses were used to determine trends, two-sided Chi-square tests with statistical significance set to p<0.05 used to compare opioid mortality proportions from different years and mortalities between age groups. Lastly findings were correlated to geography to ascertain if urbanization correlated to opioid mortality. Results: Approximately 1056 fatal opioid overdoses occurred in 2017, up 192% from 550 deaths in 2010. Fatal overdoses from heroin and synthetic accounted for only 2% and 17% of total deaths in 2010 but magnified to 20% and 32% by 2017 (p<0.05). Beginning 2013, heroin and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl together drove Georgia opioid mortality sharply higher. Among different age groups, Georgians aged 25-34yrs experienced the highest mortalities compared to other females within the same age group (p<0.05) and to males and female in the 35-44yrs and 45-54yrs groups (p<0.05). Correlating fatalities to geography found urban areas in Atlanta, Augusta, and Columbus to have the highest mortality rates. Conclusion: Georgians have experienced an unprecedented surge in mortality from opioid-related overdoses in recent years. With robust healthcare data management systems, however, new research endeavors are poised to generate more thorough epidemiological reports that will better inform local and state health policy.
    • Georgia Cancer Center Integrated Genomics Resource & HPC Server

      Chang, Chang-Shen (Sam); Georgia Cancer Center
      Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University is home to a High Performance Computing (HPC) Server. One goal of the HPC server is to host the new Biorepository software, LabVantage. This software is a web-based laboratory information management system, which tracks samples throughout their lifespan. All specimens that the Georgia Cancer Center Biorepository receives is entered into LabVantage, which generates a unique barcode number for each sample. Chain of custody is recorded throughout the sample’s lifespan, from inception to eventual withdrawal. LabVantage organizes data such as patient demographics, diagnosis, organ site, and linked pathology reports. 
LabVantage is compliant with all regulations relevant to patient privacy and satisfies all regulations set forth by The College of American Pathologists (CAP). All Biorepository personnel are trained to maintain confidentiality of patient information according to HIPAA regulations. The HPC Server is also used for the analysis of complex data including Next-Generation Sequencing data (NGS). It is currently used to perform data analysis on datasets such as those obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The analyses that used to take several weeks can now be performed in a matter of days. Georgia Cancer Center HPC Server is composed of 544 total compute cores and an aggregated memory of 2.9TB. The system is composed of (15) PowerEdge R430 1U systems (128 GB RAM each), (1) PowerEdge R830 (1024 GB RAM) and a high-speed 10GbE interconnect for intra-node communication. The HPCC also houses 633 TB RAW storage capacity. We will also be integrating existing Cancer Center servers including our Illumina Compute system that collects data directly from the Sequencer housed in the Georgia Cancer Center Integrated Genomics Shared Resource and the existing Bioinformatics HPC (see configuration diagram below). Access to the server is available to all Augusta University employees. There is a nominal fee associated with usage and users are required to undergo training.
    • Organizing, Describing, and Sharing Research Data: A Handout

      Marshall, Brianna; UCR Library, University of California, Riverside
    • Organizing, Describing, and Sharing Research Data

      Marshall, Brianna; UCR Library, University of California, Riverside
    • Data Repositories for Research Reproducibility: A Handout

      Davies, Kathy; Putnam Davis, Jennifer; University Libraries
    • Data Repositories For Research Reproducibility

      Davies, Kathy; Putnam Davis, Jennifer; University Libraries
    • Non-invasive Biomarkers to Detect Acute Kidney Injury in Premature Infants

      Marin, Terri; Williams, Bryan; Bhatia, Jatinda; Sharma, Ashok; Mundy, Cynthia; Cockfield, Christy; College of Nursing; Department of Pediatrics: Neonatology; Department of Population Health Science; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology; et al.
    • SF12v2 Health Scores for African Americans in a Cluster-randomized Community Trial

      Joshua, Thomas V.; Gavin, Jane T.; Marion, Lucy; Williams, Lovoria B.; College of Nursing
    • NOTES ON DATA + INFORMATION DESIGN

      Goodson Rubio, Holly; Institutional Effectiveness
    • Trends in Research Data Management

      Nurnberger, Amy; Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    • AU IT Data Management Services and Challenges

      Buenger, Anthony; Information Technology at Augusta University
    • Effects of Withholding Cell Phones on Students' Autonomic Arousal, State Anxiety, and Test Scores

      Recinos, Manderley; Streets, Hannah; Gaffney, Jasmine; Department of Psychological Sciences; Augusta University; Johnson, Michelle (2019-02-13)
      Approximately 85% of Americans aged 18-29 have smartphones. Many people report that they get agitated when their phones are not immediately accessible.1,2Researchers studying the links between phone use and academic performance have focused on their disruptive nature (e.g., texting). No research has examined the effects of withholding phones during testing on test performance. The objective of this study was to assess whether withholding phones during testing affected students state anxiety, skin conductance (SC), and test scores. State anxiety is situationally determined, transitory, and associated with autonomic nervous system activation. SC (sweat gland secretions) is an index of sympathetic nervous system activation. We expected higher levels of self-reported state anxiety, higher levels of SC, and lower test performance among students who had their phones withheld compared with students who kept their phones. Eighty-six students participated. There were three conditions: phones withheld but kept in the same room as testing condition (n= 31), phones withheld but sequestered in a different room (n= 28), and control where students were not separated from their phones (n= 27). One-way MANOVA revealed no differences between the groups in state anxiety, SC or test scores. Data did reveal interesting trends we would like to discuss.
    • DEVELOPMENT OF TRANSGENIC ZEBRAFISH MODEL FOR INVESTIGATION OF THE FUNCTION OF MICROGLIA

      Sura, Survasha; Department of Biological Sciences; Department of Biochemical and Molecular Biology; Georgia Cancer Center; Augusta University; Rajpurohit, Surendra K (2019-02-13)
      Zebrafish have emerged as a powerful model organism for elucidating the development and function of microglia. Generation of new transgenic reporter lines and imaging tools strengthen the zebrafish model in microglia study�in-vivo. The aim is to develop a novel compound transgenic line to study the inflammatory process mediated by NF-kB in microglia cells. This novel compound transgenic line will establish a new model for microglia study. To generate the novel compound zebrafish transgenic model for microglia, we are crossbreeding microglia transgenic line zebrafish (Tg(mpeg1:mCherry) with the NF-kB Tg(6xNFkB:EGFP) transgenic progeny. We first generate a heterozygous F1 progeny which will be bred to generate an F2 homozygous progeny. Once the F1 progeny of the Microglia-NfkB transgenic line is developed, they will be crossbred to develop the Homozygous compound transgenic line. Fluorescent Microscopy will be used to screen the larvae generated from the breeding events. By developing the compound transgenic line, we are optimizing microglia isolation and sorting methodology by using the related antibodies as the marker. The NF-kB microglia transgenic line will provide a unique platform for drug screening to address microglial based ailments, thus furthering the understanding and treatment of human disease.
    • AN EXAMINATION OF MORAL PANICS: HOW THE FEAR OF SATANISM AFFECTED TABLETOP ROLE PLAYING

      Williams, Travis; Department of Biological Sciences; Department of Communication; Department of Anthropology & Philosophy; Augusta University; Johnson, Edgar; McClelland-Nugent, Ruth (2019-02-13)
      Moral panics around youth entertainment have been an occurrence as long as culture has been established. As long as youth entertainment has values that can be seen as going against the established values of the preceding generation, a moral panic could take place. The purpose of this research was to analyze how moral panics centered on youth entertainment begin and gain traction. To do this, the research was focused on the 1980s moral panic around tabletop roleplaying games, specifically�Dungeons & Dragons. By tracing the origin of the moral panic to the fear of cults and occult from the 1970s, we can find more context as to why some individuals believed that role playing games could cause adolescents to use the games as a style of dangerous escapism or as a gateway to the occult. To further understand this moral panic, an analysis of some of the major detractors of role playing games was done, as well as researching the role the media played in cultivating the moral panic. With a greater understanding on how moral panics begin and gain traction, this research can be used to compare and contrast other moral panics around youth entertainment.
    • DESIGN AND SYNTHESIS OF HYBRID CONJUGATES AS POTENTIAL ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS

      Littlefield, William E; Wade, Margaret; Makkanal, Tina; College of Science and Mathematics; Department of Chemistry and Physics; Augusta University; Panda, Silva (2019-02-13)
      Infectious diseases caused by pathogenic microorganisms are major challenges despite all the steps taken to control or cure. New drug development with high efficacy/selectivity for infectious diseases is a point of interest for many researchers. It has reported that tuberculosis is one of the ten major causes of death in the world. Multi-drug resistance (MDR) is another major concern in bacterial and fungal infections. The present study deals with the development of new conjugates of pyrazinoic acid and isoniazid linked via an amino acid. The synthesized conjugates show promising and interesting results against a variety of microbial strains, tuberculous and non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Molecular modeling studies were used for understanding and validation of the experimental data.