Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDixon, Megan K.
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-01T19:59:47Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-01T19:59:47Zen
dc.date.issued2015-11-13en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/583083en
dc.descriptionPresentation given at the CURS Brown Bag Seminar Series on November 13, 2015en
dc.description.abstractObservational research on captive populations of Western Lowland Gorillas has been used to identify and understand the social patterns of captive, as well as wild, gorilla groups. My research focuses on identifying aggressive and competitive behaviors such as biting, slapping, threatening, pushing, etc. in the Western Lowland Gorilla population at Zoo Atlanta. This research is in its preliminary stages, focusing on the existing literature and studies of both wild and captive gorillas used to gain insight into the social dynamic of primates. The literature reviewed for my research focuses on the impact of aggressive behaviors on a gorilla family group, the situation the target behavior occurred in, and the types of responsive behaviors elicited from the initial aggression. Begin Time: 31:17 End Time: 59:58
dc.description.sponsorshipCenter for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship; Katherine Reese Pamplin College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences; Department of History, Anthropology & Historyen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFallen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2015en
dc.relation.urlhttps://lecture.gru.edu/ess/echo/presentation/c6aaf27c-db4b-4035-a58a-20de0b0f7266?ec=trueen
dc.subjectZoo Atlantaen
dc.subjectObservational Researchen
dc.subjectResponsive Behaviorsen
dc.titleComparative Study of Aggression in Captive Western Lowland Gorillas with Their Wild Counterpartsen_US
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentKatherine Reese Pamplin College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciencesen
dc.contributor.mentorTrunzo, Jenniferen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-27T09:06:45Z
html.description.abstractObservational research on captive populations of Western Lowland Gorillas has been used to identify and understand the social patterns of captive, as well as wild, gorilla groups. My research focuses on identifying aggressive and competitive behaviors such as biting, slapping, threatening, pushing, etc. in the Western Lowland Gorilla population at Zoo Atlanta. This research is in its preliminary stages, focusing on the existing literature and studies of both wild and captive gorillas used to gain insight into the social dynamic of primates. The literature reviewed for my research focuses on the impact of aggressive behaviors on a gorilla family group, the situation the target behavior occurred in, and the types of responsive behaviors elicited from the initial aggression. Begin Time: 31:17 End Time: 59:58


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Dixon_Megan_2015.pptx
Size:
1.088Mb
Format:
Microsoft PowerPoint 2007
Description:
PowerPoint Presentation to ...

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record