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dc.contributor.authorByron, Craig D.
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-11T21:54:49Z
dc.date.available2015-02-11T21:54:49Z
dc.date.issued2005-07en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/344381
dc.description.abstractA central hypothesis that cranial suture growth and modeling vary with respect to the mechanical loading environment is tested in a mouse sagittal suture model using three Specific Aims. Experiments within these aims were designed to elucidate mechanisms of bone formation and bone resorption at the cellular level and to determine how these processes influence the morphology and performance of cranial suture connective tissues. It is argued that suture waveform complexity (measured using fractal analysis) is generated by the positive coupling of osteogenesis along convex bone margins and bone resorption along concave bone margins and that this turnover cycle is regulated in large part by mechanical forces acting on the suture bone-ligament interface. This suture formfunction relationship is believed to operate via mechanosensing mechanisms within skeletal connective tissues. Although mechanically-induced cell wounding appears to be involved in normal suture biology, it does not occur in the fashion predicted. Apoptosis is not directly implicated. Thus, it is predicted that bone resorption in cranial sutures does not localize according to regions of shear-induced cell death but rather to regions adjacent to osteoblastic activity. Tension rather than shear is most likely to be the driving force in this system.
dc.relation.urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/305405925?accountid=12365en
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en
dc.subjectCranial Suturesen
dc.subjectSagittalen
dc.subjectBiomechanicsen
dc.subjectFinite Element Analysisen
dc.subjectFractal Dimensionen
dc.subjectMouseen
dc.subjectBone Formationen
dc.subjectBone Resportionen
dc.subjectOsteoclasten
dc.subjectMyostatinen
dc.titleThe Mechanobiology of Cranial Suturesen
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Cellular Biology and Anatomyen
dc.description.advisorHamrick, Mark W.en
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en
dc.description.committeeBorke, Jim; Isales, Carlos; McNeil, Paul; Yu, Jacken
html.description.abstractA central hypothesis that cranial suture growth and modeling vary with respect to the mechanical loading environment is tested in a mouse sagittal suture model using three Specific Aims. Experiments within these aims were designed to elucidate mechanisms of bone formation and bone resorption at the cellular level and to determine how these processes influence the morphology and performance of cranial suture connective tissues. It is argued that suture waveform complexity (measured using fractal analysis) is generated by the positive coupling of osteogenesis along convex bone margins and bone resorption along concave bone margins and that this turnover cycle is regulated in large part by mechanical forces acting on the suture bone-ligament interface. This suture formfunction relationship is believed to operate via mechanosensing mechanisms within skeletal connective tissues. Although mechanically-induced cell wounding appears to be involved in normal suture biology, it does not occur in the fashion predicted. Apoptosis is not directly implicated. Thus, it is predicted that bone resorption in cranial sutures does not localize according to regions of shear-induced cell death but rather to regions adjacent to osteoblastic activity. Tension rather than shear is most likely to be the driving force in this system.


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