Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAmbrogne, Janet A.
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-30T20:50:25Z
dc.date.available2015-01-30T20:50:25Z
dc.date.issued1999-04en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/344020
dc.description.abstractOver the past two decades there has been an increase in the number of research studies addressing alcohol and drug dependent women. Findings from these studies support a number of characteristics unique to women that have implications for treatment. Despite these findings, the majority of existing treatment modalities for substance dependence have continued to be based on traditional models of additions and treatment. Further, few studies have explored women's perceptions of their alcohol use, or the struggles that women encounter in their efforts to temper their alcohol use. The purpose of this qualitative study was to forward an interpretive theory about how alcohol dependent women experience temperance. This study was a focused ethnography, and was guided by a feminist perspective. The techniques of in-depth interviewing and participant observation were employed as a means of eliciting the perspective of a purposive sample of fourteen women. Concurrent data collection and analysis generated an interpretive theory that went beyond the women’s experiences with temperance. The theory: From Chaos to Connection: Patterns of Compensation in Alcohol Dependent Women, answered the questions, “What are women’s experiences with alcohol dependence?” A cultural theme of patterns of compensation was identified. The women used alcohol and other drugs as compensatory mechanisms to alleviate feelings of inadequacy and depression. Through participation in treatment and twelve-step self-help groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous, the women learned to replace their former compensatory mechanisms of drinking and using, with compensatory strategies designed to manage the disease of alcoholism. Even with successful abstinence, the women continued to struggle with feelings of depression and low self-worth. While they had learned purposeful strategies that facilitated abstinence, feelings of depression and inadequacy endured. These findings challenge the utility of dominant models of addiction such as the disease model, which focuses on substance dependence as the primary problem, in adequately meeting the needs of women who use alcohol and other substances to alleviate negative feelings such as depression. Findings from this study support the need to integrate other models of addiction, such as the Self-Medication Hypothesis into treatment programs for women. Implications for nursing, policy and future research directions are forwarded.
dc.relation.urlhttp://ezproxy.augusta.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/304541488?accountid=12365en
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en
dc.subjectAlcohol abuseen
dc.subjectAlcoholismen
dc.subjectWomenen
dc.subjectCompensationen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectSubstance abuse treatmenten
dc.titlePatterns of Compensation in Alcohol Dependent Womenen
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Physiological and Technological Nursingen
dc.description.advisorBoyle, Joyceenen
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophy with a Major in Nursingen
dc.description.committeeBennett, Gerald; Ellis, Linda; McCranie, Eden
html.description.abstractOver the past two decades there has been an increase in the number of research studies addressing alcohol and drug dependent women. Findings from these studies support a number of characteristics unique to women that have implications for treatment. Despite these findings, the majority of existing treatment modalities for substance dependence have continued to be based on traditional models of additions and treatment. Further, few studies have explored women's perceptions of their alcohol use, or the struggles that women encounter in their efforts to temper their alcohol use. The purpose of this qualitative study was to forward an interpretive theory about how alcohol dependent women experience temperance. This study was a focused ethnography, and was guided by a feminist perspective. The techniques of in-depth interviewing and participant observation were employed as a means of eliciting the perspective of a purposive sample of fourteen women. Concurrent data collection and analysis generated an interpretive theory that went beyond the women’s experiences with temperance. The theory: From Chaos to Connection: Patterns of Compensation in Alcohol Dependent Women, answered the questions, “What are women’s experiences with alcohol dependence?” A cultural theme of patterns of compensation was identified. The women used alcohol and other drugs as compensatory mechanisms to alleviate feelings of inadequacy and depression. Through participation in treatment and twelve-step self-help groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous, the women learned to replace their former compensatory mechanisms of drinking and using, with compensatory strategies designed to manage the disease of alcoholism. Even with successful abstinence, the women continued to struggle with feelings of depression and low self-worth. While they had learned purposeful strategies that facilitated abstinence, feelings of depression and inadequacy endured. These findings challenge the utility of dominant models of addiction such as the disease model, which focuses on substance dependence as the primary problem, in adequately meeting the needs of women who use alcohol and other substances to alleviate negative feelings such as depression. Findings from this study support the need to integrate other models of addiction, such as the Self-Medication Hypothesis into treatment programs for women. Implications for nursing, policy and future research directions are forwarded.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record