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dc.contributor.authorHankins, Jessica V.
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-05T03:33:43Z
dc.date.available2014-09-05T03:33:43Z
dc.date.issued2011-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/325907
dc.descriptionThe file you are attempting to access is currently restricted to Augusta University. Please log in with your NetID if off campus.
dc.description.abstractBacteria assemble remarkable surface structures that interface with their surrounding environment. One such structure is the glycolipid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that covers the surface of Gram-negative bacteria. LPS is anchored to the bacterial cell by its lipid anchor known as lipid A. Since lipid A is the bioactive component of LPS, modulation of its structure can have a profound impact on disease by altering the host immune response. Additionally, LPS structure directly impacts the outer membrane permeability barrier and bacterial resistance to host antimicrobial peptides. Although the lipid A domain of Escherichia coli has been well characterized, the Vibrio cholerae lipid A biosynthetic pathway has received little attention. The late stages of lipid A biosynthesis include the transfer of the 3-deoxy-Dmanno- octulosonic acid (Kdo) sugars and the secondary acyl chains to the lipid A backbone. Here, the V. cholerae Kdo transferase (Vc0233) was shown to be monofunctional, transferring one Kdo residue to the lipid A precursor, lipid IVA. V. cholerae encode a Kdo kinase (Vc0227) responsible for the phosphorylation of the Kdo residue. The functionality of Vc0227 was shown to be required for the activity of the V. cholerae lipid A LpxL homologue, Vc0213. Interestingly, the addition of the phosphate group on the Kdo sugar was shown to be essential for lipid A secondary acylation in Haemophilus influenzae and Bordetella pertussis. Vc0213 was shown to catalyze the transfer of a myristate (C14:0) to the 2′-position of the V. cholerae phosphorylated Kdolipid A domain. A second protein, Vc0212, acts as an LpxM homologue and transfers 3- hydroxylaurate (3-OH C12:0) to the 3′-position creating hexa-acylated V. cholerae lipid A domain. Although lipid A secondary acyltransferases have been characterized among various Gram-negative bacteria, this is the first report of a lipid A secondary hydroxyacyltransferase. Further, the transfer of 3-hydroxylaurate (3-OH C12:0) was demonstrated to be essential for antimicrobial peptide resistance in V. cholerae and required for activation of the innate immune receptor TLR4.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/865317965?accountid=12365en
dc.subjectV. Choleraeen
dc.subjectlipid Aen
dc.subjectKdoen
dc.subjectAcyltransferaseen
dc.subjectLipopolysaccharideen
dc.subjectouter membraneen
dc.titleBiosynthesis of the Vibrio cholerae Kdo-lipid A Domain and its Role in Pathogenesisen
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biochemistry and Molecular Biologyen
dc.description.advisorTrent, M. S.en
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en
dc.description.committeeCaughman, Gretchen; Liu, Kebin; Martin, Scott; Thompson, Stuarten
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-15T13:59:33Z
html.description.abstractBacteria assemble remarkable surface structures that interface with their surrounding environment. One such structure is the glycolipid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that covers the surface of Gram-negative bacteria. LPS is anchored to the bacterial cell by its lipid anchor known as lipid A. Since lipid A is the bioactive component of LPS, modulation of its structure can have a profound impact on disease by altering the host immune response. Additionally, LPS structure directly impacts the outer membrane permeability barrier and bacterial resistance to host antimicrobial peptides. Although the lipid A domain of Escherichia coli has been well characterized, the Vibrio cholerae lipid A biosynthetic pathway has received little attention. The late stages of lipid A biosynthesis include the transfer of the 3-deoxy-Dmanno- octulosonic acid (Kdo) sugars and the secondary acyl chains to the lipid A backbone. Here, the V. cholerae Kdo transferase (Vc0233) was shown to be monofunctional, transferring one Kdo residue to the lipid A precursor, lipid IVA. V. cholerae encode a Kdo kinase (Vc0227) responsible for the phosphorylation of the Kdo residue. The functionality of Vc0227 was shown to be required for the activity of the V. cholerae lipid A LpxL homologue, Vc0213. Interestingly, the addition of the phosphate group on the Kdo sugar was shown to be essential for lipid A secondary acylation in Haemophilus influenzae and Bordetella pertussis. Vc0213 was shown to catalyze the transfer of a myristate (C14:0) to the 2′-position of the V. cholerae phosphorylated Kdolipid A domain. A second protein, Vc0212, acts as an LpxM homologue and transfers 3- hydroxylaurate (3-OH C12:0) to the 3′-position creating hexa-acylated V. cholerae lipid A domain. Although lipid A secondary acyltransferases have been characterized among various Gram-negative bacteria, this is the first report of a lipid A secondary hydroxyacyltransferase. Further, the transfer of 3-hydroxylaurate (3-OH C12:0) was demonstrated to be essential for antimicrobial peptide resistance in V. cholerae and required for activation of the innate immune receptor TLR4.


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