The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery provides comprehensive care for all aspects of orthopaedic surgery. Faculty members provide general orthopaedic care and are fellowship trained to provide expertise in total joint arthroplasty, hand and upper extremity surgery, spine surgery, pediatric orthopaedics, orthopaedic trauma, sports medicine and podiatry.


Activities in the Department focus on providing clinical services for patients seeking care for orthopaedic problems while maintaining quality educational programs for students and residents. The Department also fosters and supports both laboratory and clinical research efforts.


This community contains collections of the Department of Orthopaedics and Orthopaedic Surgery.

Collections in this community

Recent Submissions

  • MIRNA AND THEIR EFFECTS ON BONE LOSS IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY PATIENTS

    Patel, Chandani; Patel, Reeya; College of Science and Mathematics; Department of Orthopedic Surgery; Fulzele, Sadanand; Augusta University (2019-02-13)
    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been known to play a key role in bone regulation. Some miRNAs have been observed to increase bone formation via osteoblast formation and others seem to be involved in bone resorption via osteoclast formation. In this study, we aim to observe which miRNA of those secreted by cells during a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are involved in bone formation or bone resorption. Our focus miRNAs were: miRNA-151, miRNA-6991, miRNA-27a, miRNA-92, and miRNA-1224. Using mouse bone marrow monocytes (BMCs), we have induced osteoclast formation by feeding media containing macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) as well as receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANK-L). After osteoclastogenesis, it has been observed via tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining that miRNA-151 and miRNA-6991 have been up-regulated during osteoclast differentiation. Of the ones examined in our study, miRNA-27a, miRNA-92, and miRNA-1224 have shown an increase during osteoblast differentiation. The observations from this study can contribute insight for creating possible therapeutic methods for osteoporosis related diseases.
  • Split peroneus brevis tendon: an unusual cause of ankle pain and instability.

    Chauhan, Bindiya; Panchal, Pina; Szabo, Edward; Wilkins, Thad; Department of Family Medicine; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (2014-03)
    Tears of the peroneus brevis tendon may cause ankle pain, swelling, and instability. Supportive therapy with ankle bracing and analgesics is the mainstay of therapy, but surgical repair is often required in patients with ongoing symptoms. Surgical options include debridement, tubularization, or, in severe cases, resection of the damaged tendon and tenodesis. We describe a 64-year-old woman with a split peroneus brevis tendon presenting with lateral ankle pain, swelling, and instability, and we review the literature regarding presentation, diagnostic testing, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and treatment recommendations. Primary care physicians should consider peroneal tendon injuries in patients with chronic lateral ankle pain and instability.