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dc.contributor.authorChauhan, Bindiya
dc.contributor.authorPanchal, Pina
dc.contributor.authorSzabo, Edward
dc.contributor.authorWilkins, Thad
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-06T19:30:11Z
dc.date.available2014-05-06T19:30:11Z
dc.date.issued2014-03
dc.identifier.citationSplit peroneus brevis tendon: an unusual cause of ankle pain and instability., 27 (2):297-302 J Am Board Fam Meden
dc.identifier.issn1557-2625
dc.identifier.pmid24610194
dc.identifier.doi10.3122/jabfm.2014.02.130009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/316534
dc.description.abstractTears of the peroneus brevis tendon may cause ankle pain, swelling, and instability. Supportive therapy with ankle bracing and analgesics is the mainstay of therapy, but surgical repair is often required in patients with ongoing symptoms. Surgical options include debridement, tubularization, or, in severe cases, resection of the damaged tendon and tenodesis. We describe a 64-year-old woman with a split peroneus brevis tendon presenting with lateral ankle pain, swelling, and instability, and we review the literature regarding presentation, diagnostic testing, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and treatment recommendations. Primary care physicians should consider peroneal tendon injuries in patients with chronic lateral ankle pain and instability.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFMen
dc.titleSplit peroneus brevis tendon: an unusual cause of ankle pain and instability.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family Medicineen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFMen
dc.subject.keywordAnkle
dc.subject.keywordJoint Instablility
dc.subject.keywordOrthopedics
dc.subject.keywordPain
dc.subject.keywordTendons
refterms.dateFOA2019-04-09T19:24:27Z
html.description.abstractTears of the peroneus brevis tendon may cause ankle pain, swelling, and instability. Supportive therapy with ankle bracing and analgesics is the mainstay of therapy, but surgical repair is often required in patients with ongoing symptoms. Surgical options include debridement, tubularization, or, in severe cases, resection of the damaged tendon and tenodesis. We describe a 64-year-old woman with a split peroneus brevis tendon presenting with lateral ankle pain, swelling, and instability, and we review the literature regarding presentation, diagnostic testing, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and treatment recommendations. Primary care physicians should consider peroneal tendon injuries in patients with chronic lateral ankle pain and instability.


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