• Evaluating the Impact of High Fidelity Patient Simulation on Clinical Reasoning in Undergraduate Nursing Students

      Gee, Rebecca Mathews; Nursing (Augusta University, 2019-12)
      Introduction: Graduate nurses must enter nursing with clinical reasoning skills that will allow them to appropriately care for patients. With limited clinical sites, nurse educators are challenged to graduate clinically-competent nurses who possess clinical reasoning skills that will allow them to appropriately care for patients. The use of high fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) as an adjunct to clinical experiences may be a solution, but previous studies have shown limited evidence that HFPS improves clinical reasoning in nursing students. A variety of tools have been used to measure clinical reasoning (or one of its components). However, most of them were not specific to nursing. Without a consistent, nursing-specific tool, exploration of HFPS effects on clinical reasoning skills is challenging. The Nursing Specific Script Concordance Test (NSSCT), a validated nursing-specific tool measuring clinical reasoning, was used for this study. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of HFPS on the clinical reasoning skills of first-semester, pre-licensure, Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students. Two specific aims were explored: 1) determine whether teaching with HFPS scenarios improved the clinical reasoning skills of pre-licensure, first semester BSN students, and 2) determine whether the NSSCT detected a significant difference in NSSCT mean scores before and after HFPS scenarios. Methods: This study used a two-group, randomized crossover design with 14 first-semester, pre-licensure, BSN students (n = 8; n = 6). Each participant took a baseline NSSCT, followed by the experimental group participating three simulation scenarios and the control group participating in the standard curriculum only. Then a second NSSCT was administered to each participant. Then, the control group participated in the three simulation scenarios while the experimental group participated in the standard curriculum only. Then, a third NSSCT was administered. NSSCT mean scores were compared between and within the groups after each administration. Results: There were no statistical differences (p = 0.494) in mean NSSCT scores in pre-licensure, first-semester, BSN, students after participating in HFPS scenarios, inferring that in this sample, HFPS did not significantly increase clinical reasoning. There were no statistical differences in mean NSSCT scores (p = 0.064) between the control group and experimental group after the second NSSCT administration, suggesting that the clinical reasoning skills were not different between students who completed the three simulation scenarios versus students who participated in the standard curriculum alone. Finally, there were no statistical differences (p = 0.596) between the control group and experimental group after all participants completed the three simulation experiences. Conclusions: The results from this study did not conclude that HFPS improved clinical reasoning in first-semester, pre-licensure, BSN students. However, due to the limitations of this study (small sample size [n = 14], test/retest reliability, and history) a replication study with modifications should be considered to fully examine the effect of HFPS on clinical reasoning in pre-licensure, BSN students.
    • Evaluation of a Novel Compression Resistant Matrix for Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (RHBMO-2) for Onlay Graft Indications

      Lu, Sheldon; Department of Oral Biology (6/4/2014)
      The discovery and subsequent characterization of endogenous signaling peptides known as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) capable of inducing de novo bone formation in postfetal life represents a critical advancement in the understanding of tissue morphogenesis and has become an incentive to develop additional growth factor based tissue engineering strategies (Wozney & Seeherman 2004). Because BMPs act locally, a suitable carrier system must be used to ensure effective presentation of an adequate dose to a target site (Mont et al. 2004). A number of candidate biomaterials have thus been tested as potential carrier technologies (Huang et al. 2008). Currently, recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) coupled with an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) manufactured from bovine Achilles tendon Type 1 collagen is the only FDA approved device for orthopedic and craniofacial indications. Although the rhBMP-2/ACS construct has demonstrated clinical efficacy for indications including spine fusion, long bone fracture healing, sinus and alveolar augmentation, the ACS’s inability to resist tissue compression limits its use for onlay indications (Wikesjö et al. 2007).
    • Events Associated with Nuclear Assembly Following Metaphase in Mammalian Cells

      Black, Doris Ann; Department of Anatomy (1985-08)
      The process of nuclear ass~m~ly following metaphase in HeLa S3 has been shown to proceed in a serie~ ~f sequential st~ps (Welter et al., 1985). Each step is characterized -by a stage specific arrangement and orientation of chromatids to form anaphase and telophase chromatid configurations (Welter et al., 1985). To determine wh~ther the chromatid I • alignment and orientation observed in He La S3· is typical of mamm_alian cells in general, late mitotic configurations of HeLa S3 (a near triploid human cell line) were compared and contrasted to those of the Indian muntjac (a cell line with only seven chromosomes) and LN (a human primary cell line) with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All three cell lines ~xhibit stage specific tnitoti,c ·configurations when visualized with SEM following acid isolation. While chromatid alignment and orientat~on within an anaphase or te_lophase configuration are consistent within a cell line, differences in chromatid alignment and orientation occur between cell lines. At metaphase, the chromatids of all three cell lines are arranged into a radial array around the· centromeric ring, with the larger chromatids located peripherally and the smaller chromatids in the center of the array. ·At anaphase, differences in chromatid alignment and orientation are obseryeci between the "cell lines. In early anaphase He La S3, many of the peripheral chromatids · are directed toward· the spindle pole, with the remaining telomeres of the peripheral chromatids directed toward the equatorial plane (Welter et al., 1985). In Indian muntjac anaphases, the centromeres, interconnected by a structural element, the centromeric ring, lead toward the spindle -pole while the telomeres of all ch,romatids except y 2 are directed toward the equatorial plane. The anaphase orientation of chromatids obser-ved - ·- in LN exhibited an orientation intermediate between that ·of Indian m-untjac and HeLa 83. HeLa S3 is a heteroploid (near triploid) cell line with > 65 chromosomes, several of which have been rearranged. The anaphase alignment and orientation of c.hromatids observed in the Indian muntjac and: LN. (both diploid) suggest that the alignment and orientation of He La 83: anaphase chromatids is the result of crowding the additional chromatids into the centromeric ring. Isolation of HeLa S3 mitotic chromatid configuration's with detergent followed by fixation in Karnovsky's solution and observation with scanning electron microscopy, indicates that the anaphase alignment and orientation is not an.artifact produced by the acid isolation procedure of Welter and Hodge ( 1985). However·. imm u~ofluorescence studies indicate that the acid, isolation does produce changes in the -molecular nature of the configurations. · A fibrous network of interconnecting fibers found on the· sur-face and betweenadjacent chromatids, appears to function toorganize the chromatids into the stage specific mitotic configurations and to stabilize the configurations during mitosis. High resolution ~EM of the fibrous network indicates that the inte-rconnecting fibers seen during late mitosis are actually chromatin. The f-ibrous network of the periphery of telophase and interphase nuclei is resistant to DNase· digestion. Non-histone chromosomal proteins may be complexed to the peripheral fibrous network, protectingthe fibrous network from DNase digestion. Since the lamin proteins repolymerize around telophase configurations and ate observed in acid isolated nuclei on the basis· of immunofluorescence and immunoblot ) . analysis, the lamin proteins are complexe'd with the peripheral chromatin although a morphologically distinct nuclear lamina is not observable , with SEM following acid isolation. A model is proposed in which the interconnecting fibers function to bind the chromatids together, maintaining chromatid orientation and alignment and, _in conjunction with the lam in proteins, provide the skeletal framework of the nuclear membrane and pore complexes.
    • Evidence for the Escalation of Domestic Violence in 911 Call Records

      McClellan, Ann C.; Department of Biobehavioral Nursing (2002-03)
      This study was a population-based, retrospective, cohort study that examined the trajectory of domestic violence within individual households as reported via emergency 911 calls. A contextual, multi-level, geographically-referenced model was used to explain the relationships among neighborhood level factors, social disorganization indicators; household factors, number of previous episodes and total number of calls; and the escalation of domestic violence, the interval between calls and the level of severity of episodes, within individual households. The neighborhood data were derived from 1990 U.S. census data. Data on the number of domestic violence calls from individual households, the interval between each call, and the level of severity of the episode were derived from the 1997 emergency 911 database of a large southeastern city in the U.S. The pattern of recurrent calls from individual households was examined. Each emergency 911 call in the sample was coded for a set of variables. Associations among neighborhood variables that included economic status, family structure, racial composition, residential mobility, and structural density and the two outcome measures were examined. To estimate the effects of the neighborhood variables, the emergency 911 calls were linked to their respective census tracts using street addresses. Data were analyzed using a hierarchical approach. Evidence was found for the escalation of domestic violence. The number of days between consecutive episodes of violence decreased as the number of episodes of violence within a household increased. The severity of episodes of violence also increased with each subsequent episode of reported violence from the household. The proportion of female-headed householders with children in a neighborhood, a measure of family structure, was related to both the initial call interval and severity of the initial episodes of violence in households. There was significant unexplained variation among households within neighborhoods for both outcome measures. Further, neighborhood social disorganization was related to the rate of domestic violence in neighborhoods. Emergency 911 call data could provide a promising source of data for a domestic violence surveillance system, especially when linked to other data sources such as official police records.
    • Evidence for the escalation of domestic violence in 911 call records

      McClellan, Ann Chambers; School of Graduate Studies (2002-03)
      This study was a population-based, retrospective, cohort study that examined the trajectory of domestic violence within individual households as reported via emergency 911 calls. A contextual, multi-level, geographically-referenced model was used to explain the relationships among neighborhood level factors, social disorganization indicators; household factors, number of previous episodes and total number of calls; and the · escalation of domestic violence, the interval between calls and the level of severity of episodes, within individual households. The neighborhood data were derived from 1990 U.S. census data. Data on the number of domestic violence calls from individual households, the interval between each call, and the level of severity of the episode were derived from the 1997 emergency 911 database of a large southeastern city in the U.S. The pattern ofrecurrent calls from individual households was examined. Each emergency 911 call in the sample was coded for a set of variables. Associations among neighborhood variables that included economic status, family structure, racial composition, residential mobility, and structural density and the two outcome measures were examined. To estimate the effects of the neighborhood variables, the emergency 911 calls were linked to their respective census tr~cts using street addresses. Data were analyzed using a hierarchical approach. Evidence was _found for the escalation of domestic violence. The number of days between consecutive episodes of violence decreased as the number of episodes ·of · violence within a household increased. The severity of episodes of violence also increased with each subsequent episode of reported violence from the household. The proportion of female-headed householders with children in a neighborhood, a measure of family structure, was related to both the initial call interval and severity of the initial episodes of violence in households. There was significant unexplained variation among households within neighborhoods for both outcome measures. Further, neighborhood social disorganization was related to the rate of domestic violence in neighborhoods. Emergency 911 call data could provide a promising source of data for a domestic violence surveillance system, especially when linked to other data sources such as official police records.
    • Evidence Supporting Glial Derived TGF-B1 as a Modulator of Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone

      Buchanan, Clint D.; Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics (2000-03)
      The overall objective of this research is to elucidate mechanisms involved in glial cell regulation of reproductive function. Regulation of LHRH secretion is a complex process that involves a multiplicity of inputs of both excitatory and inhibitory nature, and recent evidence has demonstrated the significance of glial cell-neuron interactions in modifying the activity of LHRH producing neurons. Evidence exists indicating that glial derived growth factors may play a role in the functional control o f the LHRH neuronal network as conditioned medium from astrocytes has been shown to stimulate LHRH secretion from immortalized LHRH neurons (52-55,57,58). However, there is a controversy concerning the identity of the active factor from astrocytes that is responsible for the LHRH releasing activity of conditioned medium. Melcangi and colleagues have provided evidence that TGF-Pi may be responsible for astrocyte-conditioned medium induced LHRH release in the GTl-l cell line (55). However, many of these studies supporting a role for TGF-pi were performed using cortical astrocytes, and additionally, no attempt was made to measure TGF-Pi levels in astrocyte-conditioned medium and correlate it to conditioned medium ability to induce LHRH release. Furthermore, these studies did not discuss potential regulators of TGF-pi secretion and also failed to investigate whether TGF-p receptors, which are necessary for TGF-pi action, are expressed in the GT1 cell line or hypothalamic tissue of the female rat (55,57,58). A second group suggests that TGF-a rather than TGF-Pi may be the active astrocyte factor that regulates LHRH release (53). Although TGF-a mRNA expression and precursor peptide immunoreactivity have been reported in the female rat hypothalamus, these studies failed to demonstrate the ability of hypothalamic astrocyte cultures to produce Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. 15 TGF-a and relied upon addition of exogenous TGF-a to astrocyte cell cultures (50ng/ml 16 hours) in formation of astrocyte TGF-a-conditioned medium (25,46,52,53,76,77).
    • An examination of telenursing : description of the professional role and predictors of role stress, role ambiguity and role conflict

      Schlachta-Fairchild, Loretta M.; School of Graduate Studies (2000-11-07)
      An examination of telenursing: Description of the professional role and predictors of role stress, role ambiguity and role conflict. Telenursing is the use of telehealth technology to deliver nursing care and conduct nursing practice (Schlachta & Sparks, 1999). In response to the rapid adoption of telemedicine technology in he'1:lthcare organizations, telenursing is emerging as a new role, prompting discussion of licensure, malpractice, and credentialing issues within nursing. Role stress associated with new nursing roles such as telenursing impacts individual patients and the larger healthcare organization, causing turnover, burnout, loss of continuity of care and loss of operational expertise. As with many emerging technologies, nurses assume increasingly complex roles and responsibilities. As telemedicine proliferates, the role of nurses in participating in and improving the telemedicine process will take on more pr.ominence. It is important to identify issues related to use and integration of telemedicine into nurses' roles to minimize role stress, encourage telenursing participation and position nursing practice to take advantage of telemedicine technologi~s. Using the portion of Role Theory, that relates to the impact of Role Set upon Role· Strain, as a framework this was a descriptive ·research study that identified a current population of 796 telenurses in the U.S., representi!lg 40 states. From this population, 196 telenurses participated in a telephonic or an online, web-based survey during Summer 2000. The purposes were to 1) Describe a) telenurses' professional role(s) and characteristics and b) U.S. strategies for nursing competence and patient safety 2) Measure telenurses' work satisfaction_ and its components, and role stress and its components 3) Predict the relationship between the components of work satisfaction, individual and professional role characteristics, and role stress, role ambiguity and role conflict. iv Findings of the Telenursing Role Study indicated that the typical Y2K telenurse is 46 years old, has worked 21 years in nursing and >6 months in her telenursing position. She has a 27% chance of being an advanced practice nurse, and has at least a baccalaureate degree, and likely a graduate degree. The typical telenurse is white, female, married, and has children .. She works full-time in teleriursing and makes just over $49,000 per year. Telenurse.s work in over 29 practice settings, including web portals, private companies and for telemedicine equipment vendors. They have a host of unique, new titles such as Bioengineering Clinical Nurse Specialist, Telehealth Project Director and Consumer Information Nurse. Telenurses experience less than average role stress, role ambiguity and role conflict. They also have the same work satisfaction as other hospital-based nurses. The most important factor contributing to telenurses' work satisfaction is autonomy. Findings of regression analysis were that education level and level of work satisfaction both predict role stress and role ambiguity in telenurses. Higher education levels of telenurses are associated with higher role stress and role ambiguity. Higher levels of work satisfaction of telenurses are associated with lower role stress and role ambiguity. Role ambiguity, level of education and work satisfaction are significant predictors of role conflict in telenurses.
    • An examination of telenursing: Description of the professional role and predictors of role stress, role ambiguity and role conflict

      Schlachta-Fairchild, Loretta M.; Department of Physiological and Technological Nursing (2000-11-07)
      Telenursing is the use of telehealth technology to deliver nursing care and conduct nursing practice (Schlachta & Sparks, 1999). In response to the rapid adoption of telemedicine technology in healthcare organizations, telenursing is emerging as a new role, promoting discussion of licensure, malpractice, and credentialing issues within nursing. Rule stress associated with new nursing roles such as telenursing impacts individual patients and the larger healthcare organization ,causing turnover, burnout, loss of continuity of care and loss of operation expertise. As with many emerging technologies, nurses assume increasingly complex roles and responsibilities. As telemedicine proliferates, the role of nurses in participating in and improving the telemedicine process will take on more prominence. It is important to identify issues related to use and integration of telemedicine into nurses' roles to minimize role stress, encourage telenursing participation and position nursing practice to take advantage of telemedicine technologies. Using the portion of Role Theory, that relates to the impact of Role Set upon Role Strain, as a framework this was a descriptive research study that identified a current population of 796 telenurses in the U.S. , representing 40 states. From this population, 196 telenurses participated in a telephonic or an online, web-based survey during Summer 2000. The purposes were to 1) Describe a) telenurses' professional role(s) and characteristics and b) U.S. strategies for nursing competence and patient safety 2) Measure telenurses' work satisfaction and its components, and role stress and its components 3) Predict the relationship between the components of work satisfaction, individual and professional role characteristics, and role stress, role ambiguity and role conflict. Findings of the Telenursing Role Study indicated that the typical Y2K telenurse is 46 years old, has work 21 years in nursing and >6 months in her telenursing position. She has a 27% chance of being an advanced practice nurse, and has at least a baccalaureate degree, and likely a graduate degree. The typical telenurse is white, female, married, and has children. She works full-time in telenursing and makes just over $49,000 per year. Telenurses work in over 29 practice settings, including web portals, private companies and for telemedicine equipment vendors. They have a host of unique, new titles such as Bioengineering Clinical Nurse Specialist, Telehealth Project Director and Consumer Information Nurse. Telenurses experience less than average role stress, role ambiguity and role conflict. They also have the same work satisfaction as other hospital-based nurses. The most important factor contributing to telenurses' work satisfaction is autonomy. Findings of regression analysis were that education level and level of work satisfaction both predict role stress and role ambiguity in telenurses. Higher education levels of telenurses are associate with high role stress and role ambiguity. Higher levels of work satisfaction of telenurses are associate with lower role stress and role ambiguity. Role ambiguity, level of education and work satisfaction are significant predictors of role conflict in telenurses.
    • Examining and Fostering Effective Reading Comprehension Instructional Practices in Smalltowne

      Zills, Jennifer Amy; Department of Advanced Studies and Innovation (Augusta University, 5/22/2018)
      Abstract This mixed-methods study examined reading instructional practices at Smalltowne Elementary, as almost 30% of their third grade students were not scoring proficient in the area of English Language Arts (ELA) on the state assessment. Smalltowne is a rural elementary school located in a southeast Georgia town with a population of just under 10,000. A total of 18 female participants included both second grade (n = 9) and third grade (n = 9) teachers. Participants completed an online survey of the Literacy Orientation Survey (LOS) containing 30 Likert type items to determine their teaching orientations as either traditional, constructivist, or eclectic. Researchers interviewed 14 participants and spent a total of 50.25 hours observing instructional practices in the areas of reading comprehension, vocabulary instruction, phonics, fluency, and literacy through technology. The teachers’ survey results were compared to the observed practice to determine alignment. Nine teachers identified as eclectic, eight identified as traditional and only one teacher identified as constructivist. Observed literacy practices matched self-selected LOS scores for 11 out of the 14 teachers. Observations were conducted to determine if research-based instructional strategies were being used in the classroom, including comprehension strategies, vocabulary strategies, fluency practices, and literacy through technology. Instructional concerns were noted with higher usage of teacher-directed practice and lack of authentic use of technology for literacy to incorporate more student-centered practice. After the analysis of data, a responsive product in the form of professional development was created by researchers with input from district school leaders to expand teachers’ use of higher level questioning and technology within the classroom. Keywords: teacher orientations, reading comprehension, instructional practices
    • Examining and Fostering Effective Reading Comprehension Instructional Practices in Smalltowne

      Lemacks, Natalie; Department of Advanced Studies and Innovation (Augusta University, 5/22/2018)
      This mixed-methods study examined reading instructional practices at Smalltowne Elementary, as almost 30% of their third grade students were not scoring proficient in the area of English Language Arts (ELA) on the state assessment. Smalltowne is a rural elementary school located in a southeast Georgia town with a population of just under 10,000. A total of 18 female participants included both second grade (n = 9) and third grade (n = 9) teachers. Participants completed an online survey of the Literacy Orientation Survey (LOS) containing 30 Likert type items to determine their teaching orientations as either traditional, constructivist, or eclectic. Researchers interviewed 14 participants and spent a total of 50.25 hours observing instructional practices in the areas of reading comprehension, vocabulary instruction, phonics, fluency, and literacy through technology. The teachers’ survey results were compared to the observed practice to determine alignment. Nine teachers identified as eclectic, eight identified as traditional and only one teacher identified as constructivist. Observed literacy practices matched self-selected LOS scores for 11 out of the 14 teachers. Observations were conducted to determine if research-based instructional strategies were being used in the classroom, including comprehension strategies, vocabulary strategies, fluency practices, and literacy through technology. Instructional concerns were noted with higher usage of teacher-directed practice and lack of authentic use of technology for literacy to incorporate more student-centered practice. After the analysis of data, a responsive product in the form of professional development was created by researchers with input from district school leaders to expand teachers’ use of higher level questioning and technology within the classroom. Keywords: teacher orientations, reading comprehension, instructional practices
    • Examining Math Teacher Efficacy: A Rural Georgia Elementary School

      Gray, Mary Ann; Department of Advanced Studies and Innovation (Augusta University, 5/22/2018)
      The current study employed a mixed methods research design to examine differences in math teacher efficacy based on experience, factors influencing math teacher efficacy, and the impact of math teacher efficacy on pedagogical practice. Participants were nine math teachers of grades three through five in a rural Georgia elementary school. Bandura's construct of self-efficacy provided the theoretical framework for this study. Math teacher efficacy was assessed using the Math Teacher Survey, adapted from the Mathematics Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Instrument. Semi-structured interviews were utilized to gather information regarding participants' antecedent and professional experiences with math. Four themes emerged from interviews regarding factors influencing efficacy: (a) precursory experiences, (b) teacher preparation, training, and professional learning, (c) mathematical shifts, and (d) professional experiences. Teacher practices were captured using the Classroom Observation Protocol, adapted from Inside the Classroom Observation and Analytic Protocol, as well as lesson plans and field notes. No significant relationship was found between math teacher efficacy and years of experience or between math teacher efficacy and pedagogical practices. Implications for leaders of training and preparatory programs and staff development as well as others in education settings are explored.
    • Examining Math Teacher Efficacy: A Rural Georgia Elementary School

      Williams, Angela Michelle; Department of Advanced Studies and Innovation (Augusta University, 5/22/2018)
      The current study employed a mixed methods research design to examine differences in math teacher efficacy based on experience, factors influencing math teacher efficacy, and the impact of math teacher efficacy on pedagogical practice. Participants were nine math teachers of grades three through five in a rural Georgia elementary school. Bandura's construct of self-efficacy provided the theoretical framework for this study. Math teacher efficacy was assessed using the Math Teacher Survey, adapted from the Mathematics Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Instrument. Semi-structured interviews were utilized to gather information regarding participants' antecedent and professional experiences with math. Four themes emerged from interviews regarding factors influencing efficacy: (a) precursory experiences, (b) teacher preparation, training, and professional learning, (c) mathematical shifts, and (d) professional experiences. Teacher practices were captured using the Classroom Observation Protocol, adapted from Inside the Classroom Observation and Analytic Protocol, as well as lesson plans and field notes. No significant relationship was found between math teacher efficacy and years of experience or between math teacher efficacy and pedagogical practices. Implications for leaders of training and preparatory programs and staff development as well as others in education settings are explored.
    • The Experiences of Suffering among Persons with Pschiatric Illnesses

      Hester, Sherry R; School of Nursing (1986-11)
      Phenomenology focuses on understanding empirical matters from the perspective of those who are being studied and stresses consciousness and subjective meaning in the context of the situation. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore and describe the nature of suffering associated with a psychiatric illness as described by mentally ill indi~iduals. A combined approach of phenomenological method and content·analysis was used to analyze data from autobiographies of psychiatric patients. Data were collected from five autobiographies, then . . ~ . . . . . coded into li~e groups of content·.· Five categorie·s of suffering experiences evolved fro~ 45.codes. These ·categories were: the illness symptoms, the identification of self as mentally ill, psychiatric treatment effects and processes, the intrapsychic impact of having a·inen~al illness, and the external impact·on-the individual's roles and relationships. These five categories do not represent a linear model of the suffering experience. Instead, there are interactions among the categories that impact upon the intensity of suffering. In most cases the interaction appears to be synergistic. v· Suffering is a response to the experience of psychiatric illness but there are individual variations in the manifestations and intensity of suffering. The human response of suffering· fits in~o the proposed emotional category of individual responses of the phenomena of concern for psychiatric-mental hea;I.th nursing practice. Suffering is not a discrete entity but is an ongoing lived experience as the sufferer reacts to the cause of the suffering and begins to adapt to the chan9e in life circums·t~nces and find meaning in the suffering
    • AN EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF TIANEPTINE AS A TREATMENT FOR TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

      Packer, Jonathan; Department of Psychological Sciences (Augusta University, 2020-07)
      This study set out to determine the effectiveness of using tianeptine as a treatment for traumatic brain injury (TBI). A controlled cortical impact model was utilized to induce a bilateral moderate TBI in the frontal cortex of the rat. Sham surgeries were performed to ensure an accurate control group. Rats received 30mg/kg tianeptine, or an equal volume of saline one hour following injury and once a day for nineteen days following surgery. Rats were tested for behavioral, motor, and cognitive deficits using the following tasks: Morris water maze (reference and working memory), foot fault task, forelimb use asymmetry task, open field task, and the passive avoidance task. As well, the brains were analyzed for differences in remaining cortical tissue following injury. Significant improvement was found in the Morris water maze reference memory task, the foot fault task, and the open field task for injured rats receiving tianeptine. Similarly, significant improvement was found in the remaining cortical tissue following injury in rats receiving tianeptine. Taken together, these results indicate tianeptine may be a viable treatment for improving recovery following TBI in rats.
    • Experimental Demonstration of Lymphatic Blockage

      Bursey, Robert; Department of Anatomy (1967-03)
    • Experimental Pine Pollen Granuloumous Pneumonia In The Rat

      Adams, Dolph; Department of Pathology (1965-06)