• The Autoimmune Regulator (Aire) Confers Immunosuppressive Properties to Dendritic Cells

      Eisenman, Daniel; Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine (2007-05)
      The Autoimmune regulator (Aire) is a transcription factor that controls expression of self antigens by thymic epithelium and it plays a critical role in the deletion of autoreactive thymocytes and prevention of autoimmunity. Recent studies have reported Aire expression in dendritic cells (DC) located in spleen and lymph nodes, suggesting a role for Aire in extra-thymic tolerance induction. Molecular and functional studies conducted in this dissertation revealed that Aire induction in bone marrow derived DC results in expression of immunosuppressive cytokines and decreased expression of co-stimulatory molecules. Similar results were also obtained from lenti-virus-mediated Aire overexpression in the DC2.4 dendritic cell line. It was further shown that DC from Aire'7' mice exhibited greater antigen presenting function both in vitro and in vivo. These DC were more potent stimulators of T cell proliferation leading to increased IL-2 and IFNy production. These studies suggest that Aire7' DC may play a role in exacerbating the autoimmunity seen in Aire7' mice. DC over-expressing Aire were shown to suppress activation and proliferation of naive T cells and promote activation-induced cell death of activated T cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Aire also controls transcription of tissue-specific antigens in DC. These results, together, suggest that Aire plays an important role in the tolerogenic function of DC.
    • B-Lymphoid Cells with Attributes of Dendritic Cells Regulate T Cells via Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase

      Johnson, Burles Avner III; Cancer Research Center (2012-04)
      A rare subset of murine dendritic cells expressing the B cell marker CD19 are specialized to express the T cell regulatory enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO-competent DCs). Here we show that IDO-competent DCs expressed Pax5, a transcription factor that maintains B cell lineage commitment, and drives expression of CD19 and surface immunoglobulin (slg). However IDO-competent DCs also exhibited multiple attributes of DCs including DC marker expression and potent T cell stimulatory properties when IDO was not induced. Unexpectedly, DCs expressing IDO were present in B cell deficient mice following TLR9 ligation, indication that B cell receptor (BCR) expression was not required for IDO function. Conversely, DCs from CD19 deficient mice did not express IDO after in vivo TLR9 ligation. This defect was not caused by blockade of IDO-competent DC development in CD19-deficient mice because IDO expression was incduced in these cells by in vitro interferon gamma treatment. Even though DCs from B cell deficient mice expressed IDO following TLR9 ligation, regulatory T cells (Tregs) from B cell deficient mice had impaired suppressor activity. IDO-competent DCs expressed high levels of CD1d-deficient mice. IDO-competent DCs also expressed IL-10 deficient mice to express IDO. Finally we demonstrated that DCs from draining lymph nodes (dLNs) of four week old prediabetic female non obese diabetic (NOD) mice expressed functional IDO following topical treatment with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). However DCs from dLNs of six week old prediabetic NOD female mice did not express IDO following topical PMA treatment, indicating a critical defect in a specific immunosuppressive mechanism in NOD female mice that coincides with the appearance of insulitis. These data identify IDO competent DCs as a unique B lymphoid lineage cell type that has tightly controlled regulatory properties, and a DC subset whose acquired defect may contribute to autoimmune disease in NOD mice.
    • Induction and Role of Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase (IDO) in Controlling Responses to Influenza Infection and DNA

      Li, Lingqian; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2014-02)
      Infections and other stimuli that disturb tissue homeostasis trigger local inflammation that activates innate and adaptive immune cells. However, activated immune cells may incite effector or regulatory responses in particular inflammatory settings. We evaluate how induced indoleamine 2, 3 dioxygenase (IDO) activity modifies immune responses in influenza infected lungs and draining lymph nodes, and in spleens following systemic treatments of DNA nanoparticles (DNPs) that trigger DNA sensors. Rapid interferon (IFN) production is a common feature of responses to both influenza and double strand DNA, and type I (IFN) and type II (IFN) IFNs are potent IDO inducers. Influenza A virus infection induced IDO activity in nonhematopoietic cells in the lungs and hematopoietic cells in mediastinal lymph nodes (msLNs). IDO induction depended on type IFN signaling in the lungs while either type I or II IFN maintained IDO activity in the msLNs. Neutrophil influx into lung bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and CD8+ T cell clonal expansion were attenuated by IDO expression during primary infection. IDO ablation led to a significant alteration in the repertoire of T cell receptor (TCR) V8.3 chain usage by influenza-specific memory CD8+ T cells. Thus, IDO restrained innate immune and adaptive T cell responses during primary infection and influenced memory CD8+ T cell generation. DNA introduced systemically into mice as DNPs stimulated rapid increase in IDO activity in lymphoid and mucosal tissues. DNPs triggered specific subsets of dendritic cells (DCs) expressing the B cell marker CD19 (CD19+ DCs) to upregulate IDO and acquire potent regulatory phenotypes via an IDO-dependent mechanism. DNPs were sensed by the STimulator of INterferon Genes (STING), which triggered selective expression of type I IFN by myeloid (CD11b+) DCs in spleen. In contrast, DNP induced pro-interleukin-1 (IL1was produced primarily by myeloid CD11b+ non-DCs via a STING-independent pathway. Cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-diGMP), a direct activator of STING also induced IDO. These findings highlight the importance of contextual tissue factors and reagent delivery routes in determining immune outcomes. Targeting this distinctive tolerogenic pathway using DNPs or c-diGMP suggests effective strategies to suppress autoimmunity and to inhibit transplant rejection.
    • Porphyromonas gingivalis Escape-from Autophagy in Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells via Minor Mfa-1 Fimbra-DC-Sign Interactions

      El-Awady, Ahmed; Department of Oral Biology (2014-03)
      In professional phagocytes, early receptor recognition is crucial to determine the fate of engulfed microorganisms. Among the many pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) expressed by dendritic cells (DCs), the C-type lectin DC-SIGN is of particular interest as it has been associated with immunosuppression by infecting pathogens. While autophagy has emerged as a major immune mechanism against microbes, very little is presently understood about its role in elimination o f intracellular pathogens; especially in the context o f the PRR diversity expressed by DCs. Hence, the study aimed to investigate the role of DC-SIGN targeting by the anaerobic pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis in its intracellular survival within myeloid DCs and how intracellular routing through early and late endosomes, autophagosomes and lysosomes relate to this survival. Employed in this investigation were human monocyte derived DCs and a panel of isogenic fimbriae deficient mutant strains of P. gingivalis that express the DC-SIGN ligand (Mfa-1 fimbriae) and/or the TLR2 ligand (FimA fimbriae). The results show that uptake of P. gingivalis by the nonDC-SIGN dependent route resulted in intracellular killing and elimination of intracellular content of P. gingivalis. This route was associated with early endosomal routing through Rab5, increased LC3-II and LAMP-1, as well as the formation of double membrane intracellular phagophores. In contrast, DC-SIGN dependent uptake did not induce significant levels of Rab5, LC3- II, and LAMP1. Moreover, P. gingivalis was mostly contained within single membrane vesicles where it survived intracellularly. Survival was ameliorated by forced autophagy. These results suggest that myeloid DCs are fully capable of eliminating intracellular pathogens by autophagy but that selective engagement of DC-SIGN is a microbial tactic for evasion of antibacterial autophagy leading to intracellular survival.
    • Protection Against Colonic Inflammation and Colon Cancer by Commensal Bacterial Metabolites: An Obligatory Role for the Short- Chain Fatty Acid Transporter Slc5a8

      Gurav, Ashish; Georgia Cancer Center (2014-11)
      Dietary fiber consumption has long been known to protect against inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal carcinogenesis. In mammals, large intestinal microorganisms ferment dietary fiber to generate energy, while releasing short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as acetate, propionate and butyrate. Interestingly, SCFAs are also known to protect against intestinal inflammation and colorectal carcinogenesis, although the molecular mechanisms behind these actions are still being investigated. For most of their biological effects, SCFAs must be transported from lumen into the intestinal tissue, where they activate multiple biological processes. We and others have reported Slc5a8 as a high affinity transport mechanism for SCFAs, which would remain fully functional, even when SCFA concentration drops to sub-millimolar range, whereas other transport mechanisms are rendered inefficient. The aim of the current study was to test protective role of Slc5a8 against intestinal inflammation and colorectal carcinogenesis during suboptimal intake of dietary fiber. We observed that Slc5a8 is obligatory for HDAC-inhibition in colonic epithelium and intestinal barrier function, only when the animals were fed a dietary fiber-free diet (FF diet), and not when the animals were fed diet containing optimal amounts of fibers (FC Diet). Compared to WT, Slc5a8-/- animals demonstrated higher susceptibility to AOMDSS- mediated intestinal inflammation and colorectal carcinogenesis under FF dietary conditions, but not under FC dietary conditions. At molecular level, we found that butyrate and propionate could induce potent immunosuppressive enzymes Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A2 in dendritic cells obtained from WT animals, but not from Slc5a8-/- animals. Butyrate, transported via Slc5a8 enabled DCs to suppress conversion of naïve T cells to interferon-γ secreting pro-inflammatory T cells and Slc5a8-/- animals harbored higher proportion of interferon-γ+ CD4+ T cells in vivo. Taken together, our data provide crucial evidence for critical role of Slc5a8 mediating protective effects of dietary fiber metabolites, SCFAs in protecting against intestinal inflammation and colorectal carcinogenesis.