• Winning the obesity battle

      Blumenthal, Daniel S.; American College of Preventive Medicine, Department of Community Health & Preventive Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine (Georgia Public Health Association, 2016)
      There is no doubt that the United States, and especially Georgia, suffers from an obesity problem. Over a third of U.S. adults are obese (CDC, 2016a), as are about 18% of children and 21% of adolescents (CDC, 2016b). Similar percentages in each category are overweight, with a body mass index (BMI) greater than is considered healthy, but not great enough to fall into the obese category. [INTRODUCTION]
    • A Worldwide Crisis: Inappropriate Antibiotic Use and Resistant Bacterial Infections

      Vickery, A.; Wilde, James (Georgia Public Health Association, 2006)
      The GUARD (Georgia United against Antibiotic Resistant Disease) Coalition seeks to reduce the spread of antibiotic-resistant disease and save antibiotic efficacy by decreasing inappropriate antibiotic use throughout the state of Georgia. The GUARD Coalition functions through the collaborative efforts of approximately 148 professional, academic, and community partners.
    • Zika virus communication preferences of pregnant women: Beyond the verbal

      Ellingston, Mallory; Chamberlain, Allson; Emory University (Georgia Public Health Association, 2017)
      Background: Pregnant women are frequently a priority group during public health emergencies, including the current Zika virus outbreak. These women turn to prenatal care providers for health information, but providers may not have the time for discussions with every patient. Knowing alternative ways to communicate key Zika-related information to pregnant women is important. Methods: To determine pregnant women’s preferences for obtaining Zika information from their prenatal providers, a 27-item survey was administered to 408 pregnant women at four prenatal care clinics in Atlanta between May 5th, 2016 and June 20th, 2016. The anonymous survey evaluated women’s preferences for receiving information about three topics: Zika virus, maternal vaccines and safe medications. Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests were used to determine statistical significance of associations between these topics and selected patient characteristics. Significance was evaluated at α=0.05. Results: Educational brochures (63.8%), e-mails (55.2%) and their provider’s practice website (40.2%) were women’s most preferred modalities for receiving information about Zika virus beyond verbal communication. Most women (73.2%) use the CDC website as their primary source of information about Zika virus; only 19.2% seek that information on their provider’s website. Conclusions: Conveying Zika-related information to pregnant women is essential. As public health practitioners create and refine provider-to-patient communications, they can use these findings to ensure their messages align with how women want to receive information (e.g., brochures, emails, provider websites) and take advantage of existing modalities (e.g. their own websites) that providers may not be fully utilizing.
    • The Zika virus in the United States: A comprehensive review

      Lindsey, Daniel; Greenburg, Martin; Mercer University (Georgia Public Health Association, 2016)
      Background: With a series of outbreaks spanning the globe, the Zika virus has transitioned, in a short time, from an obscure virus to a public health emergency. Locally transmitted Zika has reached the United States, leading to increased concern regarding further transmission and the potential impact on public health. Methods: The present study was conducted to examine the propagation and effects of Zika in the United States by reviewing published literature regarding Zika in conjunction with updates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To gauge the regional response, including prevention and control efforts, interviews were conducted with public health and mosquito control officials. Results: Exposure to Zika may be through vectors, sexual activity with an infected partner, or congenitally to the unborn fetus. Regardless of the mode of transmission, Zika infection may result in serious neurological consequences in adults and especially in fetuses. Conclusions: Prevention of Zika infection is key to successful control of the virus. Vector control and surveillance as well as personal protection from virus exposure are necessary to avoid the potentially devastating effects of the virus. In an effort to prevent further spread, public health authorities are implementing strategies for public education, prevention, and containment.