• Adapting a physical activity intervention for youth in a rural area: A case study

      Alfonso, Moya L.; Golquitt, Gavin; Walker, Ashley; Gupta, Akrati; Department of Community Health Behavior and Education, Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health, Georgia Southern University, School of Health and Kinesiology, College of Health and Human Sciences, Georgia Southern University (Georgia Public Health Association, 2016)
      Background: Physical activity offers children and youth many well-documented positive effects on health. The present study adapted a community-based prevention marketing campaign (CBPM), VERBTM Summer Scorecard (VSS) to promote physical activity among minority youth in rural, southeast Georgia. The purpose of this paper is to describe the adaptation process, emphasizing methods used and lessons learned. Methods: A qualitative study design was used to identify social marketing concepts that informed program adaptation, including two focus groups with 12 children and two focus groups with 14 parents. Qualitative thematic data analysis was used to analyze formative research. The adapted program was implemented for three summers, from 2012 through 2014. A case study of program implementation and lessons learned is provided. Results: Formative research results suggested two changes to VSS that would be required for the program to work in this rural community - a focus on parent-child activities instead of a sole focus on youth and changes to the Scorecard that was used to track physical activity. Over the course of three years of implementation, several lessons were learned about university community partnerships (e.g., the need for a balance of power), having a program champion, and program evaluation. Conclusions: Rural communities are a unique context, with barriers to health promotion efforts that serve to contribute to negative health behaviors and resistance to change. The limited capacity of rural communities to address physical activity makes these barriers difficult to overcome, even during implementation of evidence-based practices.
    • Addressing childhood obesity in Georgia: Past, present, and future

      Kibbe, Debra L.; Vall, Emily Anne; Green, Christine; Fitzgerald, Brenda F.; Minyard, Karen J.; Cornett, Kelly; Georgia Health Policy Center, Georgia State University, Georgia Department of Public Health (Georgia Public Health Association, 2016)
      Background: The Trust for America's Health ranks Georgia 17th (16.5%) in the nation for childhood obesity prevalence among youth aged 10-17 years. Georgia has a long history of addressing childhood obesity at the state, regional, and local levels. This report outlines the historical efforts in childhood obesity in Georgia from the mid-1990’s to the present, summarizes current childhood obesity prevention and management strategies, and provides childhood obesity-related data relevant to the current strategies. Methods: Childhood obesity-related efforts in Georgia from 1996 to the present are documented, along with how these efforts led to the creation of Georgia Shape. The Georgia Shape Childhood Obesity Prevention Initiative, created by Governor Nathan Deal in 2012, established a statewide, 10-year plan of action to address childhood obesity. It convenes more than 125 governmental, philanthropic, academic and business community partners quarterly to work towards reducing the incidence of childhood obesity and overweight in Georgia. Evidence supporting the Georgia Shape objectives is described, along with current program and policy efforts that may allow achievement of its goal of having 69% of Georgia’s children in a healthy weight range by the year 2023. Results: Georgia's obesity rate for low-income, 2- to 4-year old children has decreased. Over the 2013-2015 school years, there has been no increase in BMI at the population level among school age children and youth, and the percentage of boys and girls with increased aerobic capacity has improved. Future efforts should focus on middle and high school students; engaging and educating parents of young children; and state policies that support safe, daily physical activity and access to healthy, local food. Conclusions: A long history of childhood obesity activities in Georgia has led to a strategic plan of action, with contributions from many stakeholders. These efforts aim to reduce the prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity in Georgia over 10 years
    • Advocating for pregnant women in prison: Georgia can do better

      Webb, Nancy C.; Gates, Madison L. (Georgia Public Health Association, 2015)
      Background: Women are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. prison populace and approximately 1 in 25 were pregnant when they were incarcerated. However, women, including pregnant women, are receiving unacceptable health care in correctional systems. Further, many correctional systems lack policies to protect the best interest of incarcerated women, mothers and their children. Methods: We reviewed the literature on pregnant women in prison and found that corrections has been slow in making changes and adapting facilities for women, especially related to pregnancy, parenting skills and nurseries. It has been suggested the parent-infant attachment and the involvement incarcerated parents have with their children can help in preventing intergenerational crime. Results: The prison system in the U.S. is not set up to meet the needs of pregnant women prisoners. Many states, including Georgia, do not have policies regarding prenatal care or the use of restraints during labor and delivery. Conclusions: Georgia should rethink its prison-spending model. It would behoove Georgia’s leaders to take a look at what programs exist for pregnant women and mothers and consider adopting a model that would be a good fit for our state. We propose a collaborative approach for stakeholders to improve the care of pregnant offenders and the health of their children.
    • After initial accreditation - The PHAB Annual Report

      Roberts, Gurleen; Frantz, Emily; Kennedy, Jack; Cobb & Douglas Public Health (Georgia Public Health Association, 2017)
      Background: Cobb & Douglas Public Health (CDPH) was the first health district in Georgia to achieve accreditation by the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) (accredited on May 12, 2015). Since then, two additional health districts, DeKalb (3-5) and Gwinnett, Newton, and Rockdale County Health Departments (3-4), have achieved accreditation. Efforts are underway among health districts statewide to become accredited, yet, little is known about life after accreditation. This presentation will highlight CDPH’s approach to submitting the PHAB Annual Report, which is required of health departments in order to maintain their accreditation status. Methods: CDPH will provide an overview of the PHAB Annual Report process and requirements. We will also share the process we used to construct a one-year timeline to prepare for the submission of the Annual Report and organize the Accreditation Team. CDPH will also provide a preview of the electronic submission process using ePHAB. Finally, CDPH will share tips, including lessons learned while preparing and submitting the Annual Report during July-August 2016. We will also discuss our experiences since submission and feedback received from PHAB’s Evaluation and Quality Improvement Committee. Results: CDPH will share knowledge and experiences related to the submission and feedback received of its first PHAB Annual Report, which was submitted August 2016. Conclusions: Health departments devote a tremendous amount of time, money, and energy to become accredited; however, the journey continues through the submission of PHAB Annual Progress Reports and reaccreditation planning.
    • Air pollution, physical activity, and markers of acute airway oxidative stress and inflammation in adolescents

      Pasalic, Emilia; Hayat, Matthew J; Greenwald, Roby; Georgia State University (Georgia Public Health Association, 2016)
      Background: The airway inflammatory response is likely the mechanism for adverse health effects related to exposure to air pollution. Increased ventilation rates during physical activity in the presence of air pollution increases the inhaled dose of pollutants. However, physical activity may moderate the relationship between air pollution and the inflammatory response. The present study aimed to characterize, among healthy adolescents, the relationship between dose of inhaled air pollution, physical activity, and markers of lung function, oxidative stress, and airway inflammation. Methods: With a non-probability sample of adolescents, this observational study estimated the association between air pollution dose and outcome measures by use of general linear mixed models with an unstructured covariance structure and a random intercept for subjects to account for repeated measures within subjects. Results: A one interquartile range (IQR) (i.e., 345.64 μg) increase in ozone (O3) inhaled dose was associated with a 29.16% average decrease in the percentage of total oxidized compounds (%Oxidized). A one IQR (i.e., 2.368E+10 particle) increase in total particle number count in the inhaled dose (PNT) was associated with an average decrease in forced expiratory flow (FEF25-75) of 0.168 L/second. Increasing activity levels attenuated the relationship between PNT inhaled dose and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO). The relationship between O3 inhaled dose and percent oxidized exhaled breath condensate cystine (%CYSS) was attenuated by activity level, with increasing activity levels corresponding to smaller changes from baseline for a constant O3 inhaled dose. Conclusions: The moderating effects of activity level suggest that peaks of high concentration doses of air pollution may overwhelm the endogenous redox balance of cells, resulting in increased airway inflammation. Further research that examines the relationships between dose peaks over time and inflammation could help to determine whether a high concentration dose over a short period of time has a different effect than a lower concentration dose over a longer period of time.
    • Analysis of hypertension control rates among participants in the Georgia Hypertension Management and Outreach Program

      Byers, Sara; O'connor, Jean; Powell-Threets, Kia; Padgett,Kia; Hallow, Melissa; University of Georgia, Emory University, Georgia Department of Health (Georgia Public Health Association, 2017)
    • Analytical Results for Two-Band Atomic Results for Two-Band Atomic Superfluid System as a Guidance for Superconducting Materials

      Vincent, Andrew; De Silva, Theja; Department of Chemistry and Physics (Augusta University Libraries, 2020-05-18)
      This item presents the abstract for a presentation at the 2021 Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference at Augusta University.
    • The Antidote: Volume 1

      Austin, Nicholas J.; Daniel, Benjamin; Chandra, Upasana; Siegelson, Aron E.; Bertrand, Natalie M.; Herrington, Kyler Roy; Allen, Griffen I.; Pennywell, Jr., Calvin W.; Elphingstone, Joseph; Reddy, Vamsi; et al. (Augusta University Libraries, 2019)
      Table of Contents: 1 Executive Board; 2 About; 3 Acknowledgments; 4 From the Dean; 5 From the Editors; Prose & Poetry: 8 Here Comes the Sun; 14 Floor 00; 17 DNR; 18 M1: The First Three Months; 21 Distracted by Study; 22 Above the Sea of Clouds; 26 Type 1; 28 Shattered; 29 The Dark; 30 The Skogman Protocol; 35 Sisyphus, Lispro, Aspart, Glargine; 36 Valhalla; 39 A Brave New Operating Room; 44 A Gift; Visual Arts: 13 Diver; 16 Masking the Pain and Hunger by Huffing Fuel in Uganda; 20 Education Commons; 24 Doctor's Office; 25 Waiting in Line; 29 Shattered; 34 Eye; 38 Telephone
    • The Antidote: Volume 2

      Collins, Patrice; Austin, Nicholas; Daniel, Benjamin; Bertrand, Natalie; Bagga, Rohan; Allen, Griffin; Ibnamasud, Shadman; Ramaswamy, Natasha; Chawla, Rishab; Liu, Elise; et al. (Augusta University Libraries, 2021)
      Table of Contents: 1-Executive Board; 2-About The Antidote; 3-Acknowledgements; 4-From the Faculty; 5-From the Editors; 8-The Path Less Traveled; 9-Giver; 10-Floating After Doctoring; 14-The Crimson Jersey; 16-Under the Smile; 17-My Amazing Techicolor Dreamcoat; 18-Becker’s Nevus and the Myth of Normal; 18-Scalpel; 21-The Limits of my Language; 22-Behind; 24-Hummingbird in a Hurricane; 25-Mi Amiga de Valle Escondido; 26-What if I Have it?; 26-Uganda Trip; 28-Her Heart, my Hands; 29-My First Patient; 30-Pandemic Project: Learning to Paint with Gouache; 33-Medicine, Education, and Empowerment; 34-The Bench; 35-Memorial Hall; 36-H&E Stainy Sky; 38-The Floating Doctors Commute; 39-My Addendum to the Hippocratic Oath; 40-Healthy Spirit, Soul, and Body; 41-Everything; 42-A Haircut; 43-World of Bacteria; 44-A Summer’s Fix; 46-Reflections on MCG Courageous Conversations; 48-My Interview Experience;
    • Application of a faith-based integration tool to assess mental and physical health interventions

      Saunders, Donna; Leak, Jean; Carver, Monique; Smith, Selina; Refreshing Springs Outreach, Medical College of Georiga (Georgia Public Health Association, 2017)
      Background: To build on current research involving faith-based interventions (FBIs) for addressing mental and physical health, this study a) reviewed the extent to which relevant publications integrate faith concepts with health and b) initiated analysis of the degree of FBI integration with intervention outcomes. Methods: Derived from a systematic search of articles published between 2007 and 2017, 36 studies were assessed with a Faith-Based Integration Assessment Tool (FIAT) to quantify faith-health integration. Basic statistical procedures were employed to determine the association of faith-based integration with intervention outcomes. Results: The assessed studies possessed (on average) moderate, inconsistent integration because of poor use of faith measures, and moderate, inconsistent use of faith practices. Analysis procedures for determining the effect of FBI integration on intervention outcomes were inadequate for formulating practical conclusions. Conclusions: Regardless of integration, interventions were associated with beneficial outcomes. To determine the link between FBI integration and intervention outcomes, additional analyses are needed.
    • The Application of Low-Cost, Close-Range Photogrammetry in Dentistry

      Patel, Mohit; Mettenburg, D.; Biological Sciences, Restorative Sciences (Augusta University Libraries, 2020-05-05)
      This item presents the abstract for a poster presentation at the 21st Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference.
    • The Arsenal Can Fast Fashion Be Sustainable and Still Be Profitable?

      Miro, Eva Miralles; Finance and Economics (Augusta University Libraries, 2020-05-05)
      This item presents the abstract for a poster presentation at the 21st Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference.
    • Arsenal Volume 2, Issue 1 (Spring 2018)

      Walton, Amberly; Venugopal, Natasha; White, Adam; Layton, James; Alexander, Khadijah; Anosike, Kingsley (Augusta University Libraries, 2018-04)
    • Arsenal: Volume 1, Issue 1 (Fall 2016)

      Walton, Amberly; Venugopal, Natasha; White, Adam; Layton, James; Alexander, Khadijah; Anosike, Kingsley (Augusta University Libraries, 2016-10)
    • Arsenal: Volume 1, Issue 2 (Spring 2017)

      Walton, Amberly; Venugopal, Natasha; White, Adam; Layton, James; Alexander, Khadijah; Anosike, Kingsley (Augusta University Libraries, 2017)
    • The Arsenal: Volume 3, Issue 1 (Spring 2020)

      Kempton, Barbara; Osby, Austin; Alapatt, Vinaya-Ann; Bertzfield, Hannah (Augusta University Libraries, 2020-03)
    • The Arsenal: Volume 3, Issue 2 (Special Edition of PKP Abstracts 2020)

      Augusta University Libraries, 2020-05-05
      This special issue of The Arsenal presents the abstracts of the 21st Annual Phi Kappa Phi (PKP) Student Research and Fine Arts Conference, with permission given from the authors and faculty advisors.
    • The Arsenal: Volume 4, Issue 1 (Special Edition of PKP Abstracts 2021)

      Augusta University Libraries, 2021-05-18
      This special issue of The Arsenal presents the abstracts of the 2021 Annual Phi Kappa Phi (PKP) Student Research and Fine Arts Conference, with permission given from the authors and faculty advisors.
    • Assessing a comprehensive approach to prevent sexual violence on campus: Implications for program improvement

      Ejikeme, Chinwe; Powell, Threets Kia; Bayo, Mosi; Toddle, Kia L; O'Connor, Jean; Georgia Department of Public Health (Georgia Public Health Association, 2017)
      Background: On college campuses, sexual violence (or sexual assault) is at epidemic proportions. As many as one in four college women experience sexual assaults, most of which are not reported, likely due to the adverse reactions stemming from social norms and attitudes about rape. To prevent sexual violence on college campuses, the multi-level factors influencing it necessitate implementation of a holistic approach channeled at all levels. The present multi-method study assessed the feasibility and effectiveness of a peer educator (PE)-facilitated program implemented as part of a comprehensive sexual assault prevention program in three small Georgia colleges. Methods: Student participants (N=128) were questioned on their attitude toward rape myths, intention to rape, and likelihood to intervene in a potential rape situation. Paired t-tests for pre-/post-test scores assessed statistical differences in mean levels of outcomes at the data collection points. In addition, a qualitative assessment explored the feasibility of implementing, on campus, a long-duration program for prevention of sexual violence. Results: The findings indicated that, after exposure to the program, participants demonstrated decreased rape myth beliefs and intention to commit rape and an increased likelihood to intervene in a potential rape situation. In addition, apart from attaining regular student attendance in the 10-week sessions of the program, implementation of the “One on Four & Beyond” program proved to be feasible. Conclusions: This preliminary, multi-approach study suggests the effectiveness of a school PE-facilitated prevention program as a component of a comprehensive approach in reducing sexual violence on campus. Future studies are necessary to enhance understanding of the impact of the program.
    • Assessing Local Parks for their Infrastructure, Issues, and Use

      Shabu, Elizabath; Kinesiology (Augusta University Libraries, 2020-05-04)
      This item presents the abstract for a poster presentation at the 21st Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference.