• Attitude towards research among undergraduate nursing students

      Bhattacharya, Anunay; Tabi, Marian; Georgia Southern University (Georgia Public Health Association, 2016)
      Background: This study investigated undergraduate nursing students’ attitude towards research. It has been shown in numerous studies that there exists a negative attitude towards research among undergraduate students and this attitude acts as a barrier. This negative attitude affects the willingness and efforts of students to excel in a research course. Methods: A 15-item pre and post-test questionnaire was administered to undergraduate nursing students to identify the factors that may have an effect on their attitude towards research. The Georgia Southern University Institutional Review Board approved the study. Statistical analysis was performed using paired sample t-test and IBM SPSS 23.0. Results: Factors that affected students’ attitude towards research included ‘anticipatory anxiety taking a research course’ (p=0.005), ‘glad that research course was over’ (p=0.009), and ‘research is a boring field’ (p=0.040) were significant at the =0.05. However, students recognized the usefulness of research to their professional career (p=0.004) and indicated the importance of attending their research classes (p=0.039). Conclusions: With the drive to make a doctorate in nursing the entry level for advanced nursing practice, changing the mindset of undergraduate nursing students towards research is essential. Therefore, the selection of teaching methods and the development of content to promote student engagement can make a difference in students’ attitudes toward undergraduate research and optimize learning outcomes.
    • Domestic violence intervention for Latino families: Baseline program evaluation data

      Cormier, Jacque-Corey; Nava, Nancy; Mora, Charmaine; Rodriguez, Rebecca; Georgia State University (Georgia Public Health Association, 2016)
      Background: In the United States, Latino families affected by domestic violence (DV) often face unique challenges influenced by changing ecologies and personal/political histories. Caminar Latino is Georgia’s first and only comprehensive DV intervention program for Latino families. The program is geared towards helping family members begin their journey towards non-violence. The purpose of this evaluation is to better understand how Caminar Latino is benefiting families within the program. Baseline data of interest included perceptions of power in the relationship among family members and whether mothers and/or youth had safety plans. Methods: A longitudinal, quasi-experimental research design was utilized to collect quantitative and qualitative data. This study was approved by Georgia State University’s Institutional Review Board. Study participants (N = 82) were men, women, and youth (8 – 17 years old only) selected from families that started the program between August 2014 and August 2015. Members of the research team read the survey questions in English or Spanish to all participants. A univariate analysis was utilized to assess baseline data. Results: There were major inconsistencies found regarding power distribution in the relationships. Half of women (50%) reported their partner having more power in the current relationship, while majority of men (77%) reported their partner and themselves sharing equal power. All men and women felt power should be equal in an ideal relationship. Only 13% of mothers and 44% of youth had a safety plan pertaining to violence. Conclusions: By examining DV in a manner consistent with the needs and preferences of families, and offering support directly within communities, community practitioners have the opportunity to capitalize on existing strengths and abilities of Latina women and families. Findings from this program evaluation provide Caminar Latino with a better understanding of the ways in which they can promote wellness and non-violence in Latino communities.