• Attitude towards research among undergraduate nursing students

      Bhattacharya, Anunay; Tabi, Marian; Georgia Southern University (Georgia Public Health Association, 2016)
      Background: This study investigated undergraduate nursing students’ attitude towards research. It has been shown in numerous studies that there exists a negative attitude towards research among undergraduate students and this attitude acts as a barrier. This negative attitude affects the willingness and efforts of students to excel in a research course. Methods: A 15-item pre and post-test questionnaire was administered to undergraduate nursing students to identify the factors that may have an effect on their attitude towards research. The Georgia Southern University Institutional Review Board approved the study. Statistical analysis was performed using paired sample t-test and IBM SPSS 23.0. Results: Factors that affected students’ attitude towards research included ‘anticipatory anxiety taking a research course’ (p=0.005), ‘glad that research course was over’ (p=0.009), and ‘research is a boring field’ (p=0.040) were significant at the =0.05. However, students recognized the usefulness of research to their professional career (p=0.004) and indicated the importance of attending their research classes (p=0.039). Conclusions: With the drive to make a doctorate in nursing the entry level for advanced nursing practice, changing the mindset of undergraduate nursing students towards research is essential. Therefore, the selection of teaching methods and the development of content to promote student engagement can make a difference in students’ attitudes toward undergraduate research and optimize learning outcomes.
    • Discussion of public health education and training, and the needs of the future public health workforce.

      Nelson, Gary; Healthcare Georgia Foundation (Georgia Public Health Association, 2017)
      Georgia enjoys a wealth of public health capacity ranging from governmental public health to academic programs as well as local, state, and internationally acclaimed organizations. Leadership is evident across public health policy, practice and research. In the closing plenary of the 2017 Annual Meeting-Faces of Public Health, GPHA engages leaders in our field in a spirited conversation on the public health workforce. The esteemed panel representing state, national, and international public health organizations will reflect on the needs of a 21st Century workforce: prepared to respond beyond emergencies and identified threats; able to adapt to an increasing complex technological, political and economic environment; committed to affecting the economic and social determinants of health inequities; and collaborating to advance the knowledge base aligned with core public health functions and essential services. Are professional standards, qualifications and credentials appropriately calibrated for the needs and opportunities ahead? How has the underlying science base for public health practice, leadership and research changed? As stewards of population health, is the workforce equipped to provide thought leadership on health policy and legislation? What’s working and what’s not working in the recruitment, preparation, and retention of Georgia’s large and diverse public health workforce? The audience will be invited to join the panel in this engaging dialogue.
    • The mentoring cycle: A two-way exchange

      Plaspohl, Sara; Armstrong State University (Georgia Public Health Association, 2016)