• AN EXPLORATION OF ELEMENTARY STUDENTS’ PERSPECTIVES ON PARTICIPATING IN A PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOR SUPPORT PROGRAM

      Ocak, Lauren A. W.; Department of Advanced Studies and Innovation (Augusta University, 2020-05)
      Children who lack prosocial skills and exhibit social-emotional deficiencies tend to have more behavior problems in school. Chronic behavior problems negatively affect students’ academics, attendance, and ability to develop relationships. Aggression, bullying, and mental health problems have also been linked to social-emotional deficiencies. Children’s prosocial skills and emotional intelligence correlate to children’s social-emotional competence. The researchers investigated students’ perspectives of their experiences with and their perception of the impact a prosocial behavior intervention, Skillstreaming the Elementary School Child (McGinnis & Goldstein, 2012), had on their behavior through focus groups and field observations. Participants were consenting and assenting second through fifth-grade students who were identified through the behavior RTI process in Rural County. Researchers also analyzed quantitative, descriptive data from a Skillstreaming Student Checklist, to investigate how students self-rated their own prosocial skills. The researchers found that the participants were able to identify prosocial skills but did not always choose to apply the prosocial skills they learned to social situations with teachers and peers. All participants communicated positive feelings towards the intervention and liked having the opportunity to escape and process their emotions. Many felt it provided them with tools they could recall and apply to their school settings. Students emphasized the importance of relationships in relation to their behavior, and students interpreted their relationships based on attributes of fairness and care. In discussion of findings, research supported the importance of relationship between teachers and students and supported the finding that students often know prosocial skills and expectations in the school setting but choose their behavior based on the relationship between the student and the teacher. Keywords: prosocial intervention, elementary students, behavioral challenge, school discipline, prosocial skills, emotional intelligence, social-emotional competence, social-emotional learning, RTI, PBIS, Skillstreaming, student perspectives
    • AN EXPLORATION OF ELEMENTARY STUDENTS’ PERSPECTIVES ON PARTICIPATING IN A PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOR SUPPORT PROGRAM

      Lott, Joe Henry; Department of Advanced Studies and Innovation (Augusta University, 2020-05)
      Children who lack prosocial skills and exhibit social-emotional deficiencies tend to have more behavior problems in school. Chronic behavior problems negatively affect students’ academics, attendance, and ability to develop relationships. Aggression, bullying, and mental health problems have also been linked to social-emotional deficiencies. Children’s prosocial skills and emotional intelligence correlate to children’s social-emotional competence. The researchers investigated students’ perspectives of their experiences with and their perception of the impact a prosocial behavior intervention, Skillstreaming the Elementary School Child (McGinnis & Goldstein, 2012), had on their behavior through focus groups and field observations. Participants were consenting and assenting second through fifth-grade students who were identified through the behavior RTI process in Rural County. Researchers also analyzed quantitative, descriptive data from a Skillstreaming Student Checklist, to investigate how students self-rated their own prosocial skills. The researchers found that the participants were able to identify prosocial skills but did not always choose to apply the prosocial skills they learned to social situations with teachers and peers. All participants communicated positive feelings towards the intervention and liked having the opportunity to escape and process their emotions. Many felt it provided them with tools they could recall and apply to their school settings. Students emphasized the importance of relationships in relation to their behavior, and students interpreted their relationships based on attributes of fairness and care. In discussion of findings, research supported the importance of relationship between teachers and students and supported the finding that students often know prosocial skills and expectations in the school setting but choose their behavior based on the relationship between the student and the teacher.
    • An Iterative Procedure to Select and Estimate Wavelet-Based Functional Linear Mixed-Effects Regression Models

      Lundeen, Jordan Sarah; Biostatistics (Augusta University, 2019-12)
      Actigraphy is the continuous long-term measurement of activity-induced acceleration by means of a portable device that often resembles a watch and is typically worn on the wrist. Actigraphy is increasingly being used in clinical research to measure sleep and activity rhythms that might not otherwise be available using traditional techniques such as polysomnography. Actigraphy has been shown to be of value when assessing circadian rhythm disorders and sleep disorders and when evaluating treatment outcomes. It can provide more objective information on sleep habits in the patient's natural sleep environment than using the patient's recollection of their activity or a written sleep diary. We propose a wavelet-based functional linear mixed model to investigate the impact of functional predictors on a scalar response when repeated measurements are available on multiple subjects. The advantage of the proposed model is that each subject has both individual scalar covariate effects and individual functional effects over time, while also sharing common population scalar covariate effects and common population slope functions. An iterative procedure is used to estimate and select the fixed and random effects by utilizing the partial consistency property of the random effect coefficients and selecting groups of random effects simultaneously via the smoothly clipped absolute deviation (SCAD) penalty function. In the first study of its kind, we compare multiple functional regression methods through a large number of simulation parameter combinations. The proposed model is applied to actigraphy data to investigate the effect of daily activity on Hamilton Rating of Depression Scale (HRSD), Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and Reduced Morningness- Eveningness Questionnare (RMEQ) scores.
    • An Analysis of Diabetes Predictors and Diagnostic Tests in a Sample of African Americans at Risk for Diabetes

      Williams, Lovoria B.; Department of Biobehavioral Nursing (2011-05)
      Recently the ADA and International Expert Committee (IEC) endorsed HbA1C for diagnosis of glucose states. Concerns exists regarding discordance between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1C; the committees do not agree on the HbA1C cut-point for diagnosis of sub-diabetic states; and the HbA1C may be more sensitive in AAs. A secondary data analysis of the Fit Body and Soul (FBAS) sample (n = 393) was conducted. FPG and HbA1C values were classified by the current ADA and the IEC HbA1C criteria. A risk factor analysis was also conducted. Results indicate different subject classification based on choice of diagnostic test and criterion used. Subjects classified as normoglycemic based on ADA FPG, ADA HbA1C and IEC HbA1C criterion were (78.9%; 30.7%; 55%) of the sample, respectively. Sub-diabetic state was (18.1%; 55.9%; 31.5%), respectively. Diabetes was (3%; 13.4%; 13.4%), respectively. Moderate correlation exists between HbA1C and FPG (Pearson’s r = 0.63 p < 0.001); there is only slight to fair agreement between ADA HbA1C and ADA FPG classifications and IEC HbA1C and ADA FPG classifications; Cohen’s Kappa = 0.127; 0.234 (p < 0.001), respectively; McNemar’s Chi Square (χ23df = 182.8; 81.54 p < 0.001) respectively. Significant predictors of HbA1C by linear regression were waist circumference (WC) and age; FPG predictors were age, WC and family history of diabetes. The risk factor analysis indicated poor agreement with either diagnostic test.
    • An Analysis of the Economy of Greece

      Mack, Michaela; Department of Mathematics (Augusta University, 2018-05)
    • Analysis of the Potential Role of GluA4 Carboxyl-Terminus in PDZ Interactions

      Coleman, Sarah K.; Cai, Chunlin; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Korpi, Esa R.; Keinanen, Kari; Mei, Lin; Department of Neurology; College of Graduate Studies (2010-01-14)
      Background: Specific delivery to synapses of a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) receptors with long-tailed subunits is believed to be a key event in many forms of activity-dependent changes in synaptic strength. GluA1, the best characterized long-tailed AMPA receptor subunit, contains a C-terminal class I PDZ binding motif, which mediates its interaction with scaffold and trafficking proteins, including synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP97). In GluA4, another long-tailed subunit implicated in synaptic plasticity, the PDZ motif is blocked by a single proline residue. This feature is highly conserved in vertebrates, whereas the closest invertebrate homologs of GluA4 have a canonical class I PDZ binding motif. In this work, we have examined the role of GluA4 in PDZ interactions
    • Angiotensin II Regulation of Aldosterone Synthase

      Nogueira, Edson da F.; Department of Physiology (2009-07)
      Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the major physiological regulator of aldosterone production acting acutely to stimulate aldosterone biosynthesis and chronically to increase the capacity of the adrenals to produce aldosterone. Aldosterone is principally synthesized in the zona glomerulosa of the adrenal by a series of enzymatic reactions leading to the conversion of cholesterol to aldosterone. The major goal of our study was to define the Ang II-induced mechanisms regulating the expression of aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) in adrenocortical cells. We approached the analysis of the protein synthesis-dependent regulation of this enzyme by defining, through microarray and real time PCR analysis, the transcription factors that are rapidly induced by Ang II incubation of adrenocortical cell models from three species (human, bovine, and rat). The gene list generated by this comparison included: ATF3, BTG2, NR4A1, NR4A2, NR4A3, EGR1, FOS, FOSB, and JUNB. Importantly, pretreatment of H295R cells with cycloheximide had no effect on Ang II induction of these genes, suggesting that they are direct targets of Ang II signaling. Co-transfection studies, used to investigate the role of these transcription factors in the regulation of CYP11B2, determined that out of the nine transcription factors listed above, only the NGFI-B family members (NGFI-B, NURR1, and NOR1) increased expression of CYP11B2. The importance of NGFI-B in the regulation of CYP11B2 was confirmed by the decrease in CYP11B2 expression in the presence of a dominant-negative (DN)- NGFI-B. A pharmacological approach used to characterize the Ang II pathways regulating transcription of NGFI-B family genes suggested that Ang II binding to the AT1R increases activity of protein kinase C (PKC), Ca -dependent calmodulin kinases (CaMK), and SRC kinase (SRC), which act to regulate the expression of the family of NGFI-B genes as well as CYP11B2. In the current study we also analyzed protein synthesis-independent mechanisms regulating CYP11B2 expression. We studied the role of the ATF/CREB family of transcription factors (ATF1, ATF2, CREB, and CREM), which may bind the cAMP response element (CRE) in the promoter region of the CYP11B2 gene. Importantly, analysis of these transcription factors in the human H295R adrenocortical cell line revealed very low expression of CREB in comparison to the other CRE-binding proteins herein studied. We investigated Ang II-induced phosphorylation of these transcription factors, their binding to the promoter region of CYP11B2, and their effect on CYP11B2 expression. Ang II time-dependently induced phosphorylation of ATF1, ATF2, and CREM in H295R cells. The association of these transcription factors with the CYP11B2 promoter region was induced by Ang II and K+. Transfection of siRNA for ATF1, ATF2, and CREM significantly reduced CYP11B2 expression in Ang II-stimulated conditions. Expression of NURR-1 alone or with constitutively active ATF1, ATF2, CREB, and CREM increased the promoter activity of CYP11B2 in H295R cells. In summary, Ang II rapidly induces expression of newly synthesized transcription factors as well as the phosphorylation of transcription factors already present in the adrenocortical cell. These events are followed by increased CYP11B2 expression and, therefore, represent important mechanisms to increase the adrenal capacity to produce aldosterone.
    • Angiotensin II Signaling Mechanisms Involved in the Elevation of Arginase Activity/Expression and Vascular Dysfunction

      Shatanawi, Alia; Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology (2011-11)
      Vascular endothelial dysfunction is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis and diabetes. Nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is needed for normal vascular function. During hypertension, diabetes or atherosclerosis, elevated levels of arginase can compete with NOS for available L-arginine thus reducing vascular NO production. Elevated angiotensin II (Ang II) is a key participant of endothelial dysfunction in many cardiovascular diseases and has been linked to elevated arginase activity. In this study we explored the signaling pathway leading to increased arginase expression/activity in responses to Ang II in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Treatment of BAEC with Ang II (10-7 M, 24 hrs) caused a 40±6% increase in arginase activity. This was accompanied by 30±8% decrease in NO production. Our studies indicate involvement of the RhoA/ROCK-p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) in Ang II-induced arginase upregulation and reduced NO production, as inhibitors of ROCK or p38 MAPK prevented the Ang II-induced increase in arginase activity. Our studies in mice also show involvement of p38 MAPK in Ang II-induced vascular dysfunction associated with elevated arginase activity and expression. Ang II (42 μg/kg/h) caused impaired EC-dependent vasorelaxation in mouse aorta (55±7% vs. 75±8% for control). This impairment was prevented by treatment with p38 inhibitor SB203580 (5 μg/kg/day). Ang II also caused a 6.2 fold increase in vascular arginase activity/expression that was completely prevented by p38 MAPK inhibition. Additionally, treatment of BAEC with Ang II causes phosphorylation of activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2) and enhancement of the binding of ATF-2 to arginase promotor through an AP-1 site as evident from electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments. Transfection of BAEC with ATF-2 siRNA prevents Ang II-induced increases in arginase activity/expression and maintains NO production. These results indicate that ATF-2 is necessary for enhanced expression of arginase by Ang II. Collectively, our results indicate that Ang II increases endothelial arginase activity/expression through a RhoA/ROCK-p38 MAPK-ATF-2 pathway leading to reduced NO production and endothelial dysfunction. Targeting these signaling steps might be therapeutic points for preventing vascular endothelial dysfunction associated with elevated arginase activity/expression.
    • Angiotensin II-Induced Protein Kinase D Activation and Regulation of Aldosterone Production

      Olala, Lawrence O.; Department of Pathology (2013-02)
      Dysregulated aldosterone production leading to hypertension and its associated complications, such as congestive heart failure, cardiac fibrosis and renal failure, are important public health concerns with a huge impact on the economy and patient quality of life. Thus, there is a high level of interest in the development of medical interventions and lifestyle changes to reduce the incidence of hypertension. Stimulation of the adrenal zona glomerulosa with angiotensin II (AngII), potassium (K+) or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), increases aldosterone production, to result in increased sodium and water retention. We have recently shown a role for the serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) in the regulation of acute aldosterone synthesis upon AngII stimulation. In this study, using both molecular and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that Src family kinases and protein kinase C (PKC) activate PKD to increase aldosterone production in bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells. We have also shown that PKD positively regulates expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein, a protein required for cholesterol transport into the mitochondria, and aldosterone synthesis. PKD plays this role, in part, through activating members of the activating transcription factor (ATF)/cAMP response element (CRE-) binding protein (CREB) family of leucine zipper transcription factors. Therefore, we hypothesize that PKC and Src family kinase-mediated PKD activation in response to AngII increases the phosphorylation and activation of ATF-2 and CREB, which bind the StAR proximal promoter thereby resulting in induction of StAR expression and stimulation of steroidogenesis.
    • Anion Monitoring of Rae's Creek by Ion Chromatography

      Walton, Amberly; Hamilton, Sterling; Myers, Stephanie; Department of Chemistry & Physics (2017-03)
      Golf courses generally require large amounts of fertilizer to maintain their course appearance. Fertilizer is a source of phosphate- and nitrogen- based compounds. These compounds can have negative effects on aquatic life if there are large amounts introduced to the surface water. The effect of a golf course on anion concentrations in Rae’s Creek was studied using ion chromatography. Over the course of one year, the following anions were tracked: nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, phosphate, bromide, and chloride. The concentrations of the anions were high enough to allow quantitative measurements and changes were observed, but the concentrations remained below EPA guidelines for streams.
    • Anion Monitoring of Rae's Creek by Ion Chromatography

      Walton, Amberly; Department of Chemistry and Physics (Augusta University, 2018-12)
      Golf courses generally require large amounts of fertilizer to maintain their course appearance. Fertilizer is a source of phosphate- and nitrogen-based compounds. These compounds can have negative effects on aquatic life if there are large amounts introduced to the surface water. The effect of a golf course on anion concentrations in Rae’s Creek was studied using ion chromatography. Over the course of one year, the following anions were tracked: nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, phosphate, bromide, and chloride. The concentrations of the anions were high enough to allow quantitative measurements and changes were observed, but the concentrations remained below EPA guidelines for streams.
    • Anomalous coronary artery found in the syncopal workup of an elderly man

      Oommen, Ronnie; Wilkins, Thad; Chen, Stephen Y; Arora, Vishal; Department of Family Medicine; Department of Medicine; Department of Cardiology (2012-07)
      Syncope, defined as a transient loss of consciousness, is seen in 1% of all visits to emergency departments and urgent care clinics in the United States. Syncope is categorized as cardiogenic, neurologic, or psychogenic. Anomalies of the coronary arteries are rare, and anomalous coronary arteries present as syncope more often in the young than in the elderly; syncope rarely occurs in patients 65 years of age and older. There are 2 major variants of coronary anomalies. In the first variant, the left main coronary artery arises from the right aortic sinus. In the second variant, the right coronary artery arises from the left aortic sinus. The risk of sudden death is higher in patients with the left coronary artery arising from the right aortic sinus. We present a case of an anomalous coronary artery discovered during the syncopal workup in a 66-year-old man because no such cases have been published in the United States. We will discuss the management of anomalous coronary arteries as well as a systematic approach to the diagnosis and management of syncope.
    • Anterior Mediastinal Mass in a Patient Requiring Lung Isolation

      Janardhanam, Ram; Patel, Vijay; Arthur, Mary E.; Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (American Society of Anesthesiologists, 2010-10)
      A patient with an anterior mediastinal mass poses numerous challenges to an anesthesiologist, the major concerns being pulmonary or cardiac collapse on induction of anesthesia. Preoperative evaluation of the chest x-ray as well as the CT scan is valuable in assessing potential problems regarding management of this type of airway. An awake fiberoptic intubation is the preferred method of securing the airway.
    • Anterograde and Retrograde Regulation of Neuromuscular Junction Formation and Aging

      Zhao, Kai; Department of Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (2018-11-29)
      The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a chemical synapse that facilitates the neuronal control of muscle contraction. Proper NMJ formation and maintenance require both anterograde and retrograde signaling. In this study, on one hand, we characterized the role of Yes-associated protein (Yap) in the formation of neuromuscular junction (NMJ). In HSA-Yap-/- mice where Yap was mutated specifically in muscle cells, AChR clusters were smaller and distributed in a broader region in the middle of muscle fibers. In addition, HSA-Yap-/- mice also exhibited remarkable presynaptic deficits including less nerve coverage of the endplates, reduced mEPP frequency and increased paired-pulse facilitation, indicating structural and functional defects. Moreover, muscle Yap mutation prevented reinnervation of denervated muscle fibers and the phenotypes were related to compromised β-catenin signaling. Both NMJ formation and regeneration deficits of HSA-Yap-/- mice were ameliorated by inhibiting β-catenin degradation, further corroborating a role of β-catenin as a downstream molecule of Yap to regulate NMJ formation and regeneration. On the other hand, we showed that Lrp4, a receptor for agrin and critical for NMJ formation and maintenance, was reduced at the protein level in aged mice, which was associated with decreased MuSK tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting compromised agrin-Lrp4-MuSK signaling in aged muscles. Transgenic expression of Lrp4 in muscles alleviated AChR fragmentation and denervation and improved neuromuscular transmission in aged mice. Lrp4 ubiquitination was augmented in aged muscles, suggesting increased Lrp4 degradation as a mechanism for the reduced protein level. We also found that sarcoglycan alpha (SGα) interacted with Lrp4 and delayed Lrp4 degradation in co-transfected HEK293 cells. AAV9-mediated expression of SGα in muscles mitigated Lrp4 degradation and NMJ decline in aged mice. These observations support a model where compromised agrin-Lrp4-MuSK signaling serves as a pathological mechanism of age-related NMJ decline and identify a novel function of SGα in stabilizing Lrp4 for NMJ maintenance in aged mice.
    • Anthropometric Predictors of Type 2 Diabetes Among White and Black Adults

      Hardy, Dale S.; Stallings, Davita T.; Garvin, Jane; Gachupin, Francine C.; Xu, Hongyan; Racette, Susan B. (2015-06)
      Objectives: To determine the best anthropometric measures for discrimination of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) among White and Black males and females: a body shape index (ABSI); body adiposity index (BAI); body mass index (BMI); waist circumference (WC); waist to height ratio (WHtR); waist to hip ratio (WHR); To identify Youden index cut-points for each anthropometric measure.
    • ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ROLE OF 17β-ESTRADIOL IN THE BRAIN

      Thakkar, Roshni Dinesh; Department of Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (2017)
      17β-estradiol (E2) is a well-known neuroprotective hormone, but its role in regulation of neuroinflammation is less understood. In the current study, we examined whether E2, acting via PELP1, can exert anti-inflammatory effects in the ovariectomized rat and mouse hippocampus to regulate NLRP3 inflammasome activation, cytokine production and microglial M1/M2 phenotype after global cerebral ischemia (GCI). The results showed that activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway and expression of its downstream products, cleaved caspase-1, and IL-1β, are temporally increased in the hippocampus after GCI, with peak levels observed at 6-7 days. E2 robustly inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome pathway activation, caspase-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, as well as gliosis after GCI at gene as well as protein levels. Moreover, E2 also profoundly suppressed the pro-inflammatory M1 microglial phenotype, while increasing the anti-inflammatory M2 microglial phenotype after GCI. Intriguingly, the ability of E2 to exert all of these anti-inflammatory effects was lost in PELP1 forebrain-specific knockout mice. These robust effects of E2 may be mediated directly upon microglia, as we found that E2 suppressed the M1 while enhancing the M2 microglia phenotype in LPS-activated BV2 microglia cells. Furthermore, E2 treatment also prevented the neurotoxic effects of BV2 microglia cells upon hippocampal HT-22 neurons, suggesting a novel E2-mediated neuroprotective effect via regulation of microglia activation and phenotype. Mechanistically, E2 strongly suppressed expression and activation of the transcription factor NF-κB in BV2 microglia cells, which is known to be a critical regulator of both microglia pro-inflammatory effects and M1/M2 microglia phenotype. Additional studies revealed that NF-κB inhibition also prevents the cytotoxic effects of BV2 microglia cells upon hippocampal HT-22 neurons. Collectively, our study suggests a novel E2-mediated neuroprotective effect via regulation of inflammasome and microglia activation and promotion of the M2 “anti-inflammatory” phenotype in the brain. KEY WORDS: Estrogen, global cerebral ischemia, NLRP3 inflammasome, microglia phenotype, cytokines, neuroprotection.
    • Antimycotic Ciclopirox Olamine in the Diabetic Environment Promotes Angiogenesis and Enhances Wound Healing

      Ko, Sae Hee; Nauta, Allison; Morrison, Shane D.; Zhou, Hongyan; Zimmermann, Andrew; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.; Ding, Sheng; Longaker, Michael T.; McNeil, Paul L.; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy; et al. (2011-11-18)
      Diabetic wounds remain a major medical challenge with often disappointing outcomes despite the best available care. An impaired response to tissue hypoxia and insufficient angiogenesis are major factors responsible for poor healing in diabetic wounds. Here we show that the antimycotic drug ciclopirox olamine (CPX) can induce therapeutic angiogenesis in diabetic wounds. Treatment with CPX in vitro led to upregulation of multiple angiogenic genes and increased availability of HIF-1α. Using an excisional wound splinting model in diabetic mice, we showed that serial topical treatment with CPX enhanced wound healing compared to vehicle control treatment, with significantly accelerated wound closure, increased angiogenesis, and increased dermal cellularity. These findings offer a promising new topical pharmacologic therapy for the treatment of diabetic wounds.
    • Aortic Calcification and Femoral Bone Density Are Independently Associated with Left Ventricular Mass in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

      Chue, Colin D.; Wall, Nadezhda A.; Crabtree, Nicola J.; Zehnder, Daniel; Moody, William E.; Edwards, Nicola C.; Steeds, Richard P.; Townend, Jonathan N.; Ferro, Charles J.; Shi, Xing-Ming; et al. (2012-06-18)
      Background: Vascular calcification and reduced bone density are prevalent in chronic kidney disease and linked to increased cardiovascular risk. The mechanism is unknown. We assessed the relationship between vascular calcification, femoral bone density and left ventricular mass in patients with stage 3 non-diabetic chronic kidney disease in a cross-sectional observational study.
    • APOROSA OCTANDRA: STUDY THE PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF ITS BARK EXTRACT AGAINST D-GALACTOSE INDUCED COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN MICE AND ITS PHYTOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATION

      Schinder, Sonya; Department of Chemistry and Physics; Panda, Silva; Augusta University (2019-02-13)
      Aging is a multifarious natural process, linked with several biochemical and morphological variations in the biological system. Aging not only challenges the increased vulnerability as well as homeostasis network to the cognition and locomotion but also to physical, mental or social activities. Medicinal plants have been used since ancient time to cure and prevent various diseases. Several natural compounds such as isoflavones, anthocyanins, and catechins isolated from plant sources act as a potent antioxidant against ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species).�Antioxidants, especially natural antioxidants are recommended for the prevention of aging. In this study, we utilized an unexplored traditional medicinal plant�Aporosa octandra�(Buch.-Ham. ex D. Don) that�belongs to the family�Euphorbiaceae,�sub-family Phyllanthaceae that is shrub to tree, up to 15 m high and comprises of 50 species, which are distributed throughout Asian regions. This plant is enlisted as a medicinal plant and is used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system. We investigated phytochemical contents of the plant and evaluated the biological activity.
    • The Application of Low-Cost, Close-Range Photogrammetry in Dentistry

      Patel, Mohit; Mettenburg, D.; Biological Sciences, Restorative Sciences (Augusta University Libraries, 2020-05-05)
      This item presents the abstract for a poster presentation at the 21st Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference.