• Waiting for Heroes: An Examination of P.1ychologica/ Disorders, Existentialism, and General Strain Themy in Superhero Films

      Hendricks, Austin; Department of Social Sciences (Augusta University, 2015-12)
      For years following the release of the first superhero comics in 1938, comic enthusiasm boomed, leading to the creation of countless superheroes and crime fighters. However, these comics were regarded by many to belong solely to a certain group of people. According to Marvel Comics publisher Martin Goodman, the main audience for comics was young kids and illiterate adults (Goldin, 2003). A big contributor to this fact was the Comic’s Code, which was introduced in 1954 by the United States government to regulate comic books and ensure that they were appropriate for children through the banning of content that was considered to be too “adult.” This led to the cancellation of many comics and the proliferation of the idea that comics were supposed to be for children. It was not until the release of the film Superman in 1978 that superheroes entered the big screen and appealed to a larger audience of all ages. While there had been many adaptations of superhero comics up to this point in the form of live-action television shows and cartoons, the 1978 Superman film presented the world of superheroes to the general public in the most influential form yet. The success of this film resulted in three sequels and the release of four films about the vigilante Batman by Tim Burton and Joel Schumacher. The success of the Superman and Batman films then led to the release of numerous other superhero film franchises including Spiderman, X-Men, Iron Man, the Christopher Nolan Batman trilogy, and Thor. These films have been met with different levels of success, ranging from mockery to large-scale financial success. Regardless of whether or not they are successful, the films attempt to reinvent the characters for a modern audience while still adhering to the comics that serve as the base material. [Introduction]
    • "Waiting for the Spider to Come Home": Mothers and Mothering in Lalita Tademy's Cane River

      Williams, Seretha D.; Department of English and Foreign Languages (Cambridge Scholars Press, 2009-11)
    • Weight Before and After the MOVE! Program

      Garvin, Jane (2014-02)
      The purpose of this study was to examine the trajectory of weight before and after enrollment in the MOVE!® program at the Charlie Norwood VAMC (CNVAMC) in Augusta, Georgia.
    • Weight Reduction Among Veterans in the MOVE! Program

      Garvin, Jane; Marion, Lucy (2013-02)
      Purpose/Aim: Determine which background and program exposure variables were associated with a 5% weight reduction
    • Weight Reduction Among Veterans in the MOVE! Program

      Garvin, Jane; Marion, Lucy; Biobehavioral Nursing (2013-03)
      Purpose: Determine which background and program exposure variables were associated with a 5% weight reduction
    • The Well Professor

      O'Keefe, Susan; Department of Communications (2016-09)
      Research shows an exponential value for people who eat well, exercise well, and sleep well. Find out how these simple, yet difficult-to-implement, daily tasks can improve your efficiency and effectiveness as a "Well Professor". Our presenter, Susan O'Keefe, serves as an adjunct professor in the AU Department of Communication. She also instructs various fitness classes throughout the CSRA. In addition to a degree in Communication/Health and Wellness from the University of Louisville, she holds several certifications in group exercise, nutrition training, and wellness. Eat Better. Feel Better. Live Better.
    • WILLIAMSON ETHER REACTION USING A SOLAR HEAT SOURCE DESIGNED FOR UNDERGRADUATE CHEMISTRY LABORATORIES

      Hammond, Caroline; Wyman, Kailey; Blair, Gregory; Department of Chemistry and Physics; Agee, Brian; Augusta University (2019-02-13)
      Since the 1990�s, scientists have been attempting to make chemical synthesis procedures more environmentally friendly.� One area of environmental concern is the amount of electricity required to provide enough energy to complete an experiment. Recently proposed solar reflectors developed from satellite dishes have the ability to be incorporated into student laboratory procedures to eliminate electricity use while demonstrating green chemistry techniques at the same time. As a result, demand to incorporate more green chemistry techniques into student laboratories has increased. An effective means for minimizing the amount of electricity needed to drive chemical reactions to completion is proposed through the use of solar parabolic reflectors. A comparative study was conducted using an electrical and solar heat source on the Williamson Ether synthesis of 2-butoxynaphthalene. This reaction was chosen as the test reaction due to its widespread use among many undergraduate chemistry programs.
    • Witchcraft and Physical Therapy Management: Application of the Inquiry-Based Model to Physical Therapy Education

      Keskula, Douglas R; Wark, ET; Department of Physical Therapy; Department of Physical Therapy (Georgia Health Sciences University, 2013-01-08)
      The purpose of this case report is to describe the inquiry-based model of instruction and its use in an entry-level physical therapy educational setting. Educators facilitate the acquisition of critical thinking skills through their choice and application of various instructional strategies and methodologies. The inquiry model is designed to help students problem solve by facilitating the acquisition of both analytical and process skills. Practice and mastery of these skills are beneficial to students in the health professions, as they will need to transfer these abilities to the complex clinical setting. This is particularly true of physical therapists, who practice in an increasingly autonomous manner. The use of the inquiry model as an instructional method complements a learner centered environment. The learning activity described below is used as a bridge to the examination, evaluation and diagnostic process the physical therapy students will need to master in subsequent didactic and clinical educational experiences. The selection of the problem used in the inquiry process is a key consideration to the success of the activity. The problem chosen must be interesting, intriguing and hold the attention of the students. A general problem such as the witchcraft example discussed in this paper is suitable for most disciplines, as specific clinical skills or content knowledge is not necessary for students to participate and be successful in this activity. The key element of the inquiry method is the debriefing session that concludes the activity. In the debriefing, faculty lead a guided discussion regarding the processes used by the learners to reach a viable solution to the problem. Areas examined include why certain hypotheses were formed, what information was sought and utilized by the learners to try to prove or disprove the hypotheses, and how the learners classified or grouped information together. The debriefing discussion highlights not the outcome of the problem but rather the critical reasoning process utilized by the learners to reach a conclusion, which is the primary goal of this learning activity. Students consistently respond favorably to this activity as evidenced by their active participation and positive course feedback. The faculty and students of the entry-level physical therapy program have found this activity to be a very pertinent precursor to the critical reasoning required for the clinical diagnostic process. Practical guidelines for the organization and implementation of the inquiry model as a type of instructional strategy are presented.
    • Wnt proteins regulate acetylcholine receptor clustering in muscle cells

      Zhang, Bin; Liang, Chuan; Bates, Ryan; Yin, Yiming; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin; Department of Neurology; Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics (2012-02-6)
      Background: The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a cholinergic synapse that rapidly conveys signals from motoneurons to muscle cells and exhibits a high degree of subcellular specialization characteristic of chemical synapses. NMJ formation requires agrin and its coreceptors LRP4 and MuSK. Increasing evidence indicates that Wnt signaling regulates NMJ formation in Drosophila, C. elegans and zebrafish.
    • You Really Are Too Kind: Implications Regarding Friendly Submissiveness in Trainee Therapists

      Cain, Lylli; Department of Psychological Sciences; Augusta University (4/20/2018)
      To facilitate patient growth, therapists must immerse themselves in the patient’s world while also being able to see what is needed for change. This process requires finding a delicate balance between supporting and pushing patients. Therapists in training are additionally tasked with incorporating supervisors’ suggestions with their own views on what is needed to help their patients. Beginning therapists with tendencies to be overly accommodating may struggle to reconcile these competing demands. Thus, the aim of the present work is to explore how trainee friendly submissiveness (FS) interfaces with psychotherapy. Prior to training, clinical graduate trainee (n = 35) FS was assessed using the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-32. Process and outcome data were then collected from each therapist’s first training case. Specifically, each trainee was assigned an undergraduate student volunteer with whom they had four non-manualized therapy sessions over the academic semester. After the third session, patients and trainees completed questionnaires assessing session impact and the working alliance, and two expert raters coded third session videotapes for techniques. Following termination, patients rated the overall helpfulness of the therapy. Trainee FS was significantly negatively associated with patient-rated depth, alliance, and overall helpfulness with moderate effects. Findings from a mediation analysis further suggested that trainees with high FS struggled to focus the therapy in a way that felt productive to patients. Implications for clinical training are discussed.
    • You Should Know: Writing about Sexuality as a Woman

      McCarty, Kirsten; Department of English & Foreign Languages; Minick, Jim; Maynard, Lee Anna; Augusta University (2019-02-13)
      This thesis is a culmination of both my research on the topic of female sexuality in writing and a sampling of my own creative work based on this research. I begin with an exploration of how the past has influenced the current landscape for women's writing, especially related to female sexuality. While women today are afforded many opportunities in the field of writing, certain topics still remain taboo for these writers. Sexuality as a whole is one such topic - from a woman's relationship with her body to her sexual desire to her experience with sexual abuse. While many modern movements are encouraging women to discuss their experiences with sexual abuse, many other aspects of female sexuality remain hidden behind shame. Realizing this has inspired me to write a series of letters to my younger sister on several aspects of femininity. My creative work consists of personal experiences with abuse, desire, and the female body. By writing about these experiences openly, without denying the details that make them distinctly feminine, I hope to further the discussion of female sexuality in more serious literature.
    • You Should Know: Writing about Sexuality as a Woman

      McCarty, Kirsten; Department of English and Foreign Languages (Augusta University, 2018-12)
      This thesis is a culmination of both my research on the topic of female sexuality in writing and a sampling of my own creative work based on this research. I begin with an exploration of how the past has influenced the current landscape for women’s writing, especially related to female sexuality. While women today are afforded many opportunities in the field of writing, certain topics still remain taboo for these writers. Sexuality as a whole is one such topic – from a woman’s relationship with her body to her sexual desire to her experience with sexual abuse. While many modern movements are encouraging women to discuss their experiences with sexual abuse, many other aspects of female sexuality remain hidden behind shame. Realizing this has inspired me to write a series of letters to my younger sister on several aspects of femininity. My creative work consists of personal experiences with abuse, desire, and the female body. By writing about these experiences openly, without denying the details that make them distinctly feminine, I hope to further the discussion of female sexuality in more serious literature.
    • YOUR NEIGHBOR'S APPROACH: LOOKING AT VARIOUS MEDICAL SYSTEMS WITHIN THE AUGUSTA AREA

      Boomer, Houlton; Department of History, Anthropology & Philosophy; Bratton, Angela; Augusta University (2019-02-13)
      This research focuses on how the health care system one is used to using effects ones ability to seek and receive care in another System. Specific examples used within the study are the Western Medical System, The Traditional Chinese Medical System, and African American Root medicine. The study was done with interviews to health care providers and with surveys to citizens of the Augusta area. Unfortunately the data collected proved inconclusive with regards to the research question. However it did reveal a great deal of information about the patient population in the area, namely the tendency to remain with a single system with regards to health and the role of financial constraints in choice of healthcare system.
    • Your Neighbors’ Approach: Looking at Various Medical Systems within the Augusta Area

      Boomer, Houlton; Department of History, Anthropology, & Philosophy (Augusta University, 2019-05)
      This research focuses on how the health care system one is used to using effects ones ability to seek and receive care in another System. Specific examples used within the study are the Western Medical System, The Traditional Chinese Medical System, and African American Root medicine. The study was done with interviews to health care providers and with surveys to citizens of the Augusta area. Unfortunately the data collected proved inconclusive with regards to the research question. However it did reveal a great deal of information about the patient population in the area, namely the tendency to remain with a single system with regards to health and the role of financial constraints in choice of healthcare system.
    • β-adrenergic receptor/β-arrestin-mediated microRNA maturation regulatory network: A new player in cardioprotective signaling

      Teoh, Jian Peng; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology / Cancer Center (2017)
      Chronic treatment with the β-blocker carvedilol (Carv) has been shown to reduce established maladaptive left ventricle (LV) hypertrophy and to improve LV function in experimental heart failure. However, the detailed mechanisms by which carvedilol improves LV failure are poorly understood. We previously showed that carvedilol is a β-arrestin-biased β1-adrenergic receptor ligand, which activates cellular pathways through β-arrestins in the heart independent of G protein-mediated second messenger signaling, a concept known as biased signaling. Here, we sought to (i) identify the effects of Carv on LV gene expression on a genome-wide basis and (ii) investigate whether Carv could regulate novel miR expression/biogenesis, thereby providing a novel mechanism for its cardioprotective effects. Gene expression profiling analysis revealed that subsets of genes are differentially expressed after Carv treatment. Further analysis categorized these genes into pathways involved in tight junction, cardiac response to malaria, viral myocarditis, glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Genes encoding proteins in the tight junction, malaria, and viral myocarditis pathways were upregulated in the LV by Carv, while genes encoding proteins in the glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis and ARVC pathways were downregulated by Carv. In addition, our findings also revealed that Carv indeed upregulates 3 mature miRs, but not their pre-miRs and pri-miRs, in a β-arrestin1/2-dependent manner. Interestingly, Carv-mediated activation of miR-466g or miR-532-5p, and miR-674 is dependent on β2AR and β1AR, respectively. Mechanistically, β-arrestins regulate maturation of 3 newly identified βAR/β-arrestin-responsive miRs (β-miRs) by associating with the Dicer complex as well as two RNA binding proteins (hnRNPK and dyskerin) on three pre-miRs. Cardiac cell approaches uncover that β-miRs act as gatekeepers of cardiac cell function by repressing deleterious targets. Our findings indicate a novel role for βAR-mediated β-arrestin signaling activated by Carv in miR maturation, which may be linked to its protective mechanism. Altogether, our findings indicate that (i) the gene expression changes may reflect the molecular mechanisms that underlie the functional benefits of Carv therapy and (ii) the novel role for βAR-mediated β-arrestin signaling activated by Carv in miR maturation, which may be linked to its protective mechanism.