• NAE1-MEDIATED NEDDYLATION IS REQUIRED FOR POSTNATAL LIVER DEVELOPMENT AND FUNCTION

      Sahay, Khushboo; Department of Physiology (7/26/2018)
      Liver disease is an important health concern and a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the United States and worldwide. NEDD8 (neural-precursor-cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8) is a novel ubiquitin-like protein modifier. The conjugation of NEDD8 to target proteins, termed neddylation, requires NEDD8 specific E1, E2 and E3 ligases. Neddylation participates in various cellular processes. However, whether neddylation regulates liver development and function is completely unknown. We created mice with hepatocyte specific deletion of NAE1, a subunit of the only NEDD8 E1 enzyme, and identified that they display severe hepatomegaly, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia from 10 days after birth. By postnatal 14 days, their liver cytoarchitecture is completely disrupted, along with formation of numerous biliary cysts, fibrosis and hypoglycemia, which ultimately result in liver failure and premature death by 6 weeks. Mechanistically, NAE1 deficiency in hepatocytes caused reduced hepatocytespecific gene expression but increased biliary/oval cell gene expression in liver. In vitro, NAE1 inhibition by MLN4924 and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated NAE1 deletion in HepG2 cells recapitulated in vivo findings with repressed expression of hepatocyte specific genes but elevated biliary/oval cell gene expression. Together, these data highlight an essential role for neddylation in regulating hepatocyte lineage commitment and function as well as polycyst formation through trans/de-differentiation of hepatocytes.
    • Nasolaryngoscopy in a family medicine clinic: indications, findings, and economics.

      Wilkins, Thad; Gillies, Ralph A; Getz, April; Zimmerman, Dave; Kang, Larry; Department of Family Medicine (2010-09)
      Nasopharyngeal complaints are common among patients who present to primary care. Patients with these complaints are often referred for nasolaryngoscopy evaluation to exclude serious conditions such as laryngeal cancer.
    • The National Physical Therapist Assistant Examination's First Time Pass Rates and Their Relationships to Education Program Faculty Attributes

      Novak, MK; Brown-Cross, Dawn; Echternach, John; Department of Physical Therapy (Nova Southeastern University, 2011-10)
      Background and Purpose. There is a paucity of published literature regarding the correlation between faculty attributes and education program pass rates on the National Physical Therapy Examination (NPTE) particularly regarding the physical therapist assistant (PTA). The purpose of this study was to 1) determine if there is a relationship between faculty attributes in PTA educational programs and program outcomes on the NPTE for Physical Therapist Assistants (NPTE-PTA) and 2) construct a prediction model for PTA program outcomes based on faculty attributes. Subjects. The 233 United States’ PTA programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) in 2006 were studied. Methods. Using a retrospective design, data were obtained regarding the PTA programs from the dataset of CAPTE’s PTA annual accreditation report and the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy’s pass rate database. Selected faculty attributes (designation of highest degree conferred, years of teaching experience, employment status, license designation [physical therapist or physical therapist assistant] and clinical specialization) were correlated to first time program pass rates. Backward deletion regression was used to predict the first time pass rate on the NPTE-PTA. Results. Based on data from 190/233 PTA programs, seven attributes had a statistically significant relationship to the outcomes on the NPTE-PTA. They were the number of: 1) full-time faculty; 2) adjunct faculty with an associate’s degree; 3) full-time faculty with a terminal degree; 4) core faculty with a terminal degree; 5) all faculty with a terminal degree 6) years of teaching experience of the full-time faculty; 7) years of teaching experience of the core faculty. Backward deletion regression analyses demonstrated an overall model of two combined predictor factors (full-time faculty years of teaching and full-time faculty terminal degree) that significantly predicted the first time pass rate on the NPTE-PTA accounting for 6.5% of the variance. Discussion and Conclusion. Faculty attributes of the institutions providing PTA programs are associated with first time pass rates of their graduates. This study provides a foundation for future studies by identifying some of the faculty attributes that relate to NPTE-PTA outcomes.
    • Natural Spike Trains Trigger Short- and Long-Lasting Dynamics at Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapses in Rodents

      Gundlfinger, Anja; Breustedt, Jorg; Sullivan, David; Schmitz, Dietmar; Tsien, Joe Z.; Department of Neurology; College of Graduate Studies (2010-04-1)
      Background: Synapses exhibit strikingly different forms of plasticity over a wide range of time scales, from milliseconds to hours. Studies on synaptic plasticity typically use constant-frequency stimulation to activate synapses, whereas in vivo activity of neurons is irregular.
    • Ndel1 Promotes Axon Regeneration via Intermediate Filaments

      Toth, Cory; Shim, Su Yeon; Wang, Jian; Jiang, Yulan; Neumayer, Gernot; Belzil, Camille; Liu, Wei-Qiao; Martinez, Jose; Zochodne, Douglas; Nguyen, Minh Dang; et al. (2008-04-23)
      Failure of axons to regenerate following acute or chronic neuronal injury is attributed to both the inhibitory glial environment and deficient intrinsic ability to re-grow. However, the underlying mechanisms of the latter remain unclear. In this study, we have investigated the role of the mammalian homologue of aspergillus nidulans NudE, Ndel1, emergently viewed as an integrator of the cytoskeleton, in axon regeneration. Ndel1 was synthesized de novo and upregulated in crushed and transected sciatic nerve axons, and, upon injury, was strongly associated with neuronal form of the intermediate filament (IF) Vimentin while dissociating from the mature neuronal IF (Neurofilament) light chain NF-L. Consistent with a role for Ndel1 in the conditioning lesion-induced neurite outgrowth of Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) neurons, the long lasting in vivo formation of the neuronal Ndel1/Vimentin complex was associated with robust axon regeneration. Furthermore, local silencing of Ndel1 in transected axons by siRNA severely reduced the extent of regeneration in vivo. Thus, Ndel1 promotes axonal regeneration; activating this endogenous repair mechanism may enhance neuroregeneration during acute and chronic axonal degeneration.
    • Need for criteria for the diagnosis and severity assessment of acute cholangitis and cholecystitis: Tokyo Guidelines.

      Sekimoto, Miho; Takada, Tadahiro; Kawarada, Yoshifumi; Nimura, Yuji; Yoshida, Masahiro; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Miura, Fumihiko; Wada, Keita; Hirota, Masahiko; Yamashita, Yuichi; et al. (2007-01-25)
      The Tokyo Guidelines formulate clinical guidance for healthcare providers regarding the diagnosis, severity assessment, and treatment of acute cholangitis and acute cholecystitis. The Guidelines were developed through a comprehensive literature search and selection of evidence. Recommendations were based on the strength and quality of evidence. Expert consensus opinion was used to enhance or formulate important areas where data were insufficient. A working group, composed of gastroenterologists and surgeons with expertise in biliary tract surgery, supplemented with physicians in critical care medicine, epidemiology, and laboratory medicine, was selected to formulate draft guidelines. Several other groups (including members of the Japanese Society for Abdominal Emergency Medicine, the Japan Biliary Association, and the Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery) have reviewed and revised the draft guidelines. To build a global consensus on the management of acute biliary infection, an international expert panel, representing experts in this area, was established. Between April 1 and 2, 2006, an International Consensus Meeting on acute biliary infections was held in Tokyo. A consensus was determined based on best available scientific evidence and discussion by the panel of experts. This report describes the highlights of the Tokyo International Consensus Meeting in 2006. Some important areas focused on at the meeting include proposals for internationally accepted diagnostic criteria and severity assessment for both clinical and research purposes.
    • Neuregulin1 promotes excitatory synapse development specifically in GABAergic interneurons

      Tin, Kin Lai; Department of Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (2010-03)
      Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and its receptor ErbB4 are both susceptibility genes of schizophrenia. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of their malfunction. Although ErbB4 is enriched in GABAergic interneurons, the role of NRG1 in excitatory synapse formation in these neurons remains poorly understood. We showed that NRG1 increased both the number and size of PSD- 95 puncta in GABAergic interneurons, indicating that NRG1 stimulates the formation of new synapses and strengthens existing synapses. In contrast, NRG1 treatment had no consistent effect on either the number or size of excitatory synapses in glutamatergic neurons, suggesting its synaptogenic effect is specific to GABAergic interneurons. Ecto-ErbB4 treatment diminished both the number and size of excitatory synapses, suggesting that endogenous NRG1 may be critical for basal synapse formation. NRG1 could stimulate the stability of PSD-95 in the manner that requires tyrosine kinase activity of ErbB4. Finally, deletion of ErbB4 in parvalbumin-positive interneurons led to reduced amplitude of mEPSCs, providing in vivo evidence that ErbB4 is important in postsynaptic differentiation in interneurons. Taken together, our findings suggested a novel synaptogenic role of NRG1 in excitatory synapse development, possibly via stabilizing PSD-95, and this effect is specific to GABAergic interneurons. In light of the association of the genes of both NRG1 and ErbB4 with schizophrenia and dysfunction of GABAergic system in this disorder, these results provide insight into its potential pathological mechanism.
    • Neuregulin3 Regulation of Glutamatergic Transmission

      Figueiredo, Dwight; Department of Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (2015-12)
      Synapses are fundamental communication units in the brain, essential for meaningful response to stimuli received from the environment. Abnormal synaptic communication leads to mental disorders. My studies focus on Neuregulin3, a member of the Neuregulin family. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) within the NRG3 gene are associated with schizophrenia in different populations. Analysis of postmortem human brain samples of schizophrenia patients revealed abnormal levels of NRG3. However, unlike its well-studied family member NRG1, NRG3’s role in synaptic transmission is not understood. I studied how depletion of Nrg3 protein in the brain could affect synaptic transmission. I measured the amplitude and the frequency of spontaneous as well as miniature Excitatory Post Synaptic Currents (sEPSC and mEPSC, respectively) at hippocampal CA1 neurons of GFAP
    • Neurexin in Embryonic Drosophila Neuromuscular Junctions

      Chen, Kaiyun; Gracheva, Elena O.; Yu, Szi-Chieh; Sheng, Qi; Richmond, Janet; Featherstone, David E.; Mei, Lin; Department of Neurology; College of Graduate Studies (2010-06-14)
      Background: Neurexin is a synaptic cell adhesion protein critical for synapse formation and function. Mutations in neurexin and neurexin-interacting proteins have been implicated in several neurological diseases. Previous studies have described Drosophila neurexin mutant phenotypes in third instar larvae and adults. However, the expression and function of Drosophila neurexin early in synapse development, when neurexin function is thought to be most important, has not been described.
    • Neuro-vascular Communication in the Hypothalamic Supraoptic Nucleus in Rats. Do nitric oxide and vasopressin play a role?

      Du, Wenting; Department of Physiology (2015-03)
      The classical model of neurovascular coupling (NVC) proposes that activity-dependent synaptically released glutamate dilates arterioles. However, whether this model is also applicable to brain areas that use less conventional neurotransmitters, such as neuropeptides, is currently unknown. To this end, we studied NVC in the hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory system (MNS) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), in which dendritically released vasopressin (VP) can be found. Bath-applied VP significantly constricted SON arterioles via activation of the V ia receptor subtype. Vasoconstriction was also observed in response to single VP neuronal stimulation, an effect prevented by V ia receptor blockade (V2255). Conversely, osmotically-driven magnocellular neurosecretory neuronal population activity leads to a predominant nitric oxide (NO)- mediated vasodilation. Activity-dependent vasodilation was followed by a VP-mediated vasoconstriction, which acted to reset vascular tone. Taken together, our results unveiled a unique and complex form of NVC in the MNS, supporting a competitive balance between activity-dependent dendritic released VP and NO, in the generation of proper NVC responses.
    • The neuroblast and angioblast chemotaxic factor SDF-1 (CXCL12) expression is briefly up regulated by reactive astrocytes in brain following neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury.

      Miller, Jason T; Bartley, John H; Wimborne, Hereward J. C.; Walker, Aisha L.; Hess, David C.; Hill, William D; Carroll, James E; Department of Neurology; Department of Pediatrics; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy (2005-12-02)
      BACKGROUND: Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1 or CXCL12) is chemotaxic for CXCR4 expressing bone marrow-derived cells. It functions in brain embryonic development and in response to ischemic injury in helping guide neuroblast migration and vasculogenesis. In experimental adult stroke models SDF-1 is expressed perivascularly in the injured region up to 30 days after the injury, suggesting it could be a therapeutic target for tissue repair strategies. We hypothesized that SDF-1 would be expressed in similar temporal and spatial patterns following hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury in neonatal brain. RESULTS: Twenty-five 7-day-old C57BL/J mice underwent HI injury. SDF-1 expression was up regulated up to 7 days after the injury but not at the later time points. The chief sites of SDF-1 up regulation were astrocytes, their foot processes along blood vessels and endothelial cells. CONCLUSION: The localization of SDF-1 along blood vessels in the HI injury zone suggests that these perivascular areas are where chemotaxic signaling for cellular recruitment originates and that reactive astrocytes are major mediators of this process. The associated endothelium is likely to be the site for vascular attachment and diapedesis of CXCR4 receptor expressing cells to enter the injured tissue. Here we show that, relative to adults, neonates have a significantly smaller window of opportunity for SDF-1 based vascular chemotaxic recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells. Therefore, without modification, following neonatal HI injury there is only a narrow period of time for endogenous SDF-1 mediated chemotaxis and recruitment of reparative cells, including exogenously administered stem/progenitor cells.
    • Neurologic Deficit Following Ultrasound Guided Femoral Nerve Block

      Aryal, Anuj; Mayfield, James; Hammonds, William D; Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine (Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia, 2010-05)
      Ultrasound provides real time visualization of peripheral nerves while performing a peripheral nerve block. We present a case of post operative neural dysfunction following ultrasound guided femoral nerve block on a patient undergoing left knee arthroscopy.
    • Neuron-derived estrogen and neural function

      Lu, Yujiao; Department of Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (Augusta University, 2020-05)
      17β-estradiol (E2) is produced from androgens via the action of the enzyme aromatase. E2 is known to be made in neurons in the brain, but its precise functions in the brain are unclear. We created a forebrain neuron-specific aromatase knockout (FBN-ARO-KO) mouse model to deplete neuron-derived E2 in the forebrain of mice. Under normal conditions, FBN-ARO-KO mice showed a 70-80% decrease in aromatase and forebrain E2 levels. Male and female FBN-ARO-KO mice exhibited significant deficits in forebrain spine and synaptic density, as well as hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions. Reinstating forebrain E2 levels via exogenous in vivo E2 administration was able to rescue both the molecular and behavioral defects in FBN-ARO-KO mice. Furthermore, electrophysiological study suggested normal long-term potentiation (LTP) induction, but significantly decreased amplitude in FBN-ARO-KO mice which could be fully rescued by acute E2 treatment in vitro. Mechanistic studies revealed that FBN-ARO-KO mice had compromised rapid kinase (AKT, ERK) and CREB-BDNF signaling in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. After global cerebral ischemia (GCI), ovariectomized female FBN-ARO-KO mice had significantly attenuated aromatase and hippocampal E2 levels. Intriguingly, FBN-ARO-KO mice exhibited a robust reduction in astrocyte activation, as well as exacerbated neuronal damage and worse cognitive dysfunction after GCI. Similar results were observed in intact male mice. RNA-seq analysis revealed alterations in pathways and genes associated with astrocyte activation, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in FBN-ARO-KO mice. The compromised astrocyte activation in FBN-ARO-KO mice was associated with robust downregulation of the astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factors, BDNF and IGF-1, as well as the astrocytic glutamate transporter, GLT-1. In vivo E2 replacement rescued the compromised reactive astrogliosis and cognitive deficits. Moreover, neuronal FGF2, which acts in a paracrine manner to suppress astrocyte activation, was dramatically increased in FBN-ARO-KO neurons. Interestingly, blocking FGF2 signaling in astrocytes by central injection of an FGFR3 antibody was able to reverse the diminishment in neuroprotective astrocyte reactivity, and attenuate neuronal damage in FBN-ARO-KO mice. Collectively, our data provides novel genetic evidence for the roles of neuron-derived E2 in regulating synaptic plasticity, cognitive function in the non-injured brain, and astrocyte activation and neuroprotection in the injured brain.
    • Neuronal and Astroglial Injury and Recovery from Stroke-Induced Depolarizations

      Risher, William Christopher; Department of Neurosurgery (2010-12)
    • Neuroprotective effects and mechanism of cognitive-enhancing choline analogs JWB 1-84-1 and JAY 2-22-33 in neuronal culture and Caenorhabditis elegans

      Keowkase, Roongpetch; Aboukhatwa, Marwa; Adam, Bao-Ling; Beach, J Warren; Terry, Alvin V.; Buccafusco, Jerry J; Luo, Yuan; Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology (2010-12-16)
      Background: Our previous work indicated that novel analogs of choline have cytoprotective effects in vitro that might be useful in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Furthermore, two lead compounds (JWB1-84-1 and JAY2-22-33) from a library of more than 50 improved cognitive performances in a transgenic mouse model of AD. The purpose of these experiments was to more specifically investigate the neuroprotective capabilities of these lead compounds both in vitro and in vivo.
    • Neuroprotective effects of cannabidiol in endotoxin-induced uveitis: critical role of p38 MAPK activation.

      El-Remessy, Azza B.; Tang, Y; Zhu, G; Matragoon, Suraporn; Khalifa, Yousef; Liu, E K; Liu, J-Y; Hanson, E; Mian, S; Fatteh, Nadeem; et al. (2008-12-04)
      PURPOSE: Degenerative retinal diseases are characterized by inflammation and microglial activation. The nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), is an anti-inflammatory in models of diabetes and glaucoma. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. We tested the hypothesis that retinal inflammation and microglia activation are initiated and sustained by oxidative stress and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation, and that CBD reduces inflammation by blocking these processes. METHODS: Microglial cells were isolated from retinas of newborn rats. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels were estimated with ELISA. Nitric oxide (NO) was determined with a NO analyzer. Superoxide anion levels were determined by the chemiluminescence of luminol derivative. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was estimated by measuring the cellular oxidation products of 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. RESULTS: In retinal microglial cells, treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced immediate NADPH oxidase-generated ROS. This was followed by p38 MAPK activation and resulted in a time-dependent increase in TNF-alpha production. At a later phase, LPS induced NO, ROS, and p38 MAPK activation that peaked at 2-6 h and was accompanied by morphological change of microglia. Treatment with 1 microM CBD inhibited ROS formation and p38 MAPK activation, NO and TNF-alpha formation, and maintained cell morphology. In addition, LPS-treated rat retinas showed an accumulation of macrophages and activated microglia, significant levels of ROS and nitrotyrosine, activation of p38 MAPK, and neuronal apoptosis. These effects were blocked by treatment with 5 mg/kg CBD. CONCLUSIONS: Retinal inflammation and degeneration in uveitis are caused by oxidative stress. CBD exerts anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects by a mechanism that involves blocking oxidative stress and activation of p38 MAPK and microglia.
    • NEUROVASCULAR DEGENERATION FOLLOWING RETINAL ISCHEMIA REPERFUSION INJURY: ROLE OF ARGINASE 2

      Shosha, Esraa; Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy (2017)
      Ischemic retinopathies such as retinopathy of prematurity, central retinal artery occlusion and diabetic retinopathy are leading causes of visual impairment and blindness. These pathologies share common features of oxidative stress, activation of inflammatory pathways and neurovascular damage. There is no clinically effective treatment for these conditions because the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. In the current study, we used a mouse model of retinal ischemia reperfusion (I/R) insult to explore the underlying mechanisms of neurovascular degeneration in ischemic retinopathies. The arginase enzyme utilizes the L-arginine amino acid for the production of L-ornithine and urea. Here, we investigated the role of the mitochondrial arginase isoform, arginase 2 (A2) in retinal I/R induced neurovascular injury. We found that retinal I/R induced neurovascular degeneration, superoxide and nitrotyrosine formation, glial activation, cell death by necroptosis and impairment of inner retinal function in wild type (WT) mice. A2 homozygous deletion (A2-/-) significantly protected against the neurovascular degeneration after retinal I/R. That was attributed to decreased oxidative stress and glial activation. A2 deletion protected against I/R induced retinal function impairment. Using Optical coherence tomography (OCT), we evaluated the retinal structure in live animals and found that A2-/- retinas showed a more preserved structure and less retinal detachment. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of A2 induced vascular damage after I/R, we used an in vitro model of oxygen glucose deprivation/ reperfusion (OGD/R) in bovine retinal endothelial cells (BRECs). Analysis of oxidative metabolism showed impaired mitochondrial function. We also found an increase in dynamin elated protein 1 (Drp1), a mitochondrial fission marker. Mitochondria labeling studies showed fragmented mitochondria after OGD/R. Arginase inhibition reduced mitochondrial fragmentation in OGD/R insult. This dissertation presents A2 as a new therapeutic target in reducing neurovascular damage in ischemic retinopathies.
    • Neurovascular Injury After Retinal Ischemia Reperfusion Insult: Contrasting Roles Of Arginase Enzyme Isoforms

      Shosha, Esraa; Vascular Biology Center (2016-03-08)
      Purpose: We have previously shown the involvement of arginase enzyme in retinal neurovascular injury. The present study was undertaken to determine the distinct roles of arginase 1 (A1) and arginase 2 (A2) in neurovascular damage following ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Methods: We used wild type (WT) mice, A2 knock out mice (A2-/-) and mice lacking one copy of A1 (A1+/-). Western blotting, RT-PCR, vascular digests, immunofluorescence, Propidium Iodide (PI) labeling and electroretinography (ERG) were used to evaluate retinal injury and function. Results: I/R injury caused significant increases in A2 expression along with thinning of the neural retina, decreases in NeuN+ GCL neurons and formation of acellular capillaries. Increases in PI labeling and RIP-3 expression showed that cell death occurred by necroptosis. Neurovascular injury was accompanied by microglial activation along with increased expression of GFAP and impairment of the ERG. Neuronal cell loss, capillary degeneration, necroptosis, gliosis and ERG impairment were all significantly reduced by deletion of A2. On the other hand, A1 deletion exacerbated I/R-induced neuronal and vascular injury and further increased necroptosis and gliosis as compared with WT retinas. Conclusions: This study shows for the first time the different roles of arginase isoforms after I/R insult. I/R-induced necrotic cell death and gliosis are mediated by A2, whereas upregulation of A1 may play a role in limiting the pathology.
    • A new measure of population structure using multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms and its relationship with FST.

      Xu, Hongyan; Sarkar, Bayazid; George, Varghese; Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (2009-03-16)
      BACKGROUND: Large-scale genome-wide association studies are promising for unraveling the genetic basis of complex diseases. Population structure is a potential problem, the effects of which on genetic association studies are controversial. The first step to systematically quantify the effects of population structure is to choose an appropriate measure of population structure for human data. The commonly used measure is Wright's FST. For a set of subpopulations it is generally assumed to be one value of FST. However, the estimates could be different for distinct loci. Since population structure is a concept at the population level, a measure of population structure that utilized the information across loci would be desirable. FINDINGS: In this study we propose an adjusted C parameter according to the sample size from each sub-population. The new measure C is based on the c parameter proposed for SNP data, which was assumed to be subpopulation-specific and common for all loci. In this study, we performed extensive simulations of samples with varying levels of population structure to investigate the properties and relationships of both measures. It is found that the two measures generally agree well. CONCLUSION: The new measure simultaneously uses the marker information across the genome. It has the advantage of easy interpretation as one measure of population structure and yet can also assess population differentiation.
    • A New Method For Analyzing 1:N Matched Case Control Studies With Incomplete Data

      Jin, Chan; Department of Biostatisctics and Epidemiology (5/8/2017)
      1:n matched case-control studies are commonly used to evaluate the association between the exposure to a risk factor and a disease, where one case is matched to up till n controls. The odds ratio is typically used to quantify such association. Difficulties in estimating the true odds ratio arise, when the exposure status is unknown for at least one individual in a group. In the case where the exposure status is known for all individuals in a group, the true odds ratio is estimated as the ratio of the counts in the discordant cells of the observed two-by-two table. In the case where all data are independent, the odds ratio is estimated using the cross-product ratio from the observed table. Conditional logistic regression estimates are used for incomplete matching data. In this dissertation we suggest a simple method for estimating the odds ratio when the sample consists of a combination of paired and unpaired observations, with 1:n matching. This method uses a weighted average of the odds ratio calculations described above. This dissertation compares the new method to existing methods via simulation.