• The Effect of Processing Techniques for rhBMP-2 Coated Titanium Implants on Alveolar Augmentation and Osseointegration in the Canine Supraalveolar Peri-Implant Defect Model

      Decker, John; Department of Oral Biology (9/5/2014)
      A current paradigm-shift in implant dentistry places restorative factors associated with esthetics and function in front of implant site selection based on bone quantity and quality. Marginal bone loss after implant placement, resorption of the edentulous alveolar ridge, bone defects from periodontal disease, and ridge aberrations due to trauma all challenge implant treatment driven by esthetics and function. Clinicians compensate for bone loss using bone augmentation procedures including bone grafts, bone materials, biologic mediators, barrier devices, or combinations thereof. The search for treatment modalities to address implant placement into compromised sites has lead to the development of a variety of products designed to replace or induce bone formation. Some believe an ideal material could be coated onto implants, to promote osseointegration, induce local bone formation, while not requiring adjunctive biomaterials, or procedures including placement of allogeneic and xenogeneic biomaterials, or autograft bone.
    • Marker Co-Expression Analysis of Initial Cellular Events in the Critical-Size Rat Calvarial Defect Model and the Effect of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (rhBMP-2)

      Capetillo, Joseph F.; Department of Oral Biology (4/15/2016)
      Craniofacial defects can result from congenital malformations, trauma, tumor resection,periodontal disease, post-extraction ridge remodeling, and peri-implantitis. Regenerationof bone is critical to achieving functional and esthetic outcomes in the rehabilitation ofsuch defects. Traditional strategies for osseous regeneration include a multiple ofsurgical techniques utilizing autologous bone, cadaver-sourced allogeneic or xenogeneicbone, synthetic bone biomaterials, barrier membranes, or combinations thereof(Wikesjö, Qahash 2009). The need to enhance the predictability of regeneration inespecially large defects that cannot heal adequately without intervention (critical-sizedefects) has led to recent development of protein- and cell-based technologies.[Introduction, first paragraph]
    • Primary versus secondary reconstruction of mandibular critical size defects using recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2: an experimental study in dogs

      Hussein, Khaled A.; Department of Oral Biology (2012-12)
      Very often, delayed reconstruction becomes the setting of choice in the reconstruction of large segmental defects in the mandible. Our hypothesis is that rhBMP2 delivery would elicit endogenous expression of BMP2 and VEGF in the soft tissue bed of the defect. Such response is expected to be more pronounced in the immediate than the delayed reconstruction, which will correlate with the quantity and quality of bone formation in the two settings. We also hypothesized that vascular endothelial cells (ECs) of the surrounding soft tissue contribute to the endogenous production of BMP2. In this study we used a mandibular canine segmental defect model (35 mm), periosteum was excised and also the delayed reconstruction group was included in this study in addition to the control group. We investigated the effect of different reconstruction settings on the quantity and quality of bony regenerates; on the production of endogenous BMP2 from the soft tissue bed of the defects and finally we tried to explore the source of this rhBMP2- induced endogenous BMP2 production both in vivo and in vitro. This study demonstrated that rhBMP2 delivery is more effective in immediate reconstruction of large mandibular segmental defects. Immediate delivery of rhBMP2 yielded more adequate reconstruction of the defect after 12 weeks, evident by the quantity and quality of the bone regenerate. Only in the immediate reconstruction group, the advantageous bone parameters were associated with significant up-regulation of BMP2 mRNA and protein in the soft tissue bed of the defect. This suggests that endogenous-BMP2 is important in maintaining the short-acting effect of the delivered rhBMP2. Regarding the source of the endogenous-BMP2, protein co-localization with ECs marker suggested that these cells could be the source for the endogenous BMP2 secretion in response to rhBMP2 treatment. This was confirmed by the in-vitro results on both the mRNA and protein levels. The gradual increase in expression of BMP2 mRNA and the significant upregulation of secreted BMP2 protein upon stimulation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with 100-ng/ml rhBMP2 recognized a new mechanism of positive feed back response of ECs in response to BMP2 treatment.