• Differential effects of taurine treatment and taurine deficiency on the outcome of renal ischemia reperfusion injury

      Mozaffari, Mahmood S.; Abdelsayed, Rafik; Patel, Champa; Wimborne, Hereward J. C.; Liu, Jun Yao; Schaffer, Stephen W; Department of Oral Biology; Department of Oral Health and Diagnostic Sciences (2010-08-24)
      Taurine possesses membrane stabilization, osmoregulatory and antioxidant properties, aspects of relevance to ischemic injury. We tested the hypothesis that body taurine status is a determinant of renal ischemic injury. Accordingly, renal function and structure were examined in control (C), taurine-treated (TT) and taurine deficient (TD) rats that were subjected to bilateral renal ischemia (60 min) followed by reperfusion (IR); sham operated rats served as controls. Baseline urine osmolality was greater in the TD group than in the control and the TT groups, an effect associated with increased renal aquaporin 2 level. The IR insult reduced urine osmolality (i.e., day-1 post insult); the TD/IR group displayed a more marked recovery in urine osmolality by day-6 post insult than the other two groups. Fluid and sodium excretions were lower in the TD/IR group, suggesting propensity to retention. Histopathological examination revealed the presence of tubular necrotic foci in the C/IR group than sham controls. While renal architecture of the TD/IR group showed features resembling sham controls, the TT/IR group showed dilated tubules, which lacked immunostaining for aquaporin 2, but not 1, suggestive of proximal tubule origin. Finally, assessment of cell proliferation and apoptosis revealed lower proliferation but higher apoptotic foci in the TT/IR group than other IR groups. Collectively, the results indicate that body taurine status is a major determinant of renal IR injury.
    • Disordered Eating Behavior in Individuals With Diabetes

      Young-Hyman, Deborah L.; Davis, Catherine L.; Department of Pediatrics; Georgia Institute for Prevention of Human Diseases and Accidents (2010-03)
    • Effect of b-alanine treatment on mitochondrial taurine level and 5-taurinomethyluridine content

      Jong, Chian Ju; Ito, Takashi; Mozaffari, Mahmood S.; Azuma, Junichi; Schaffer, Stephen W; Department of Oral Biology (2010-08-24)
      Background: The b-amino acid, taurine, is a nutritional requirement in some species. In these species, the depletion of intracellular stores of taurine leads to the development of severe organ dysfunction. The basis underlying these defects is poorly understood, although there is some suggestion that oxidative stress may contribute to the abnormalities. Recent studies indicate that taurine is required for normal mitochondrial protein synthesis and normal electron transport chain activity; it is known that defects in these events can lead to severe mitochondrial oxidative stress. The present study examines the effect of taurine deficiency on the first step of mitochondrial protein synthesis regulation by taurine, namely, the formation of taurinomethyluridine containing tRNA.
    • Epigenetic mechanisms and genome stability

      Putiri, Emily L.; Robertson, Keith D.; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; GHSU Cancer Center (2010-12-29)
      Keywords: DNA methylation
    • The role of indoleamine 2, 3 dioxygenase in regulating host immunity to leishmania infection

      Makala, Levi HC; Department of Pediatrics (2012-01-9)
      Pathogen persistence in immune-competent hosts represents an immunological paradox. Increasing evidence suggests that some pathogens, such as, Leishmania major (L. major) have evolved strategies and mechanisms that actively suppress host adaptive immunity. If this notion is correct conventional vaccination therapies may be ineffective in enhancing host immunity, unless natural processes that suppress host immunity are also targeted therapeutically. The key problem is that the basis of pathogen persistence in immune-competent individuals is unknown, despite decades of intense research. This fact, coupled with poor health care and a dearth of effective treatments means that these diseases will remain a scourge on humans unless a better understanding of why the immune system tolerates such infections emerges from research. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been shown to act as a molecular switch regulating host responses, and IDO inhibitor drugs shown to possess potential in enhancing host immunity to established leishmania infections. It is hoped that this review will help stimulate and help generate critical new knowledge pertaining to the IDO mechanism and how to exploit it to suppress T cell mediated immunity, thus offer an innovative approach to studying the basis of chronic leishmania infection in mice.
    • Strategies and methods to study sex differences in cardiovascular structure and function: a guide for basic scientists

      Miller, Virginia M; Kaplan, Jay R; Schork, Nicholas J; Ouyang, Pamela; Berga, Sarah L; Wenger, Nanette K; Shaw, Leslee J; Webb, R. Clinton; Mallampalli, Monica; Steiner, Meir; et al. (2011-12-12)
      Background: Cardiovascular disease remains the primary cause of death worldwide. In the US, deaths due to cardiovascular disease for women exceed those of men. While cultural and psychosocial factors such as education, economic status, marital status and access to healthcare contribute to sex differences in adverse outcomes, physiological and molecular bases of differences between women and men that contribute to development of cardiovascular disease and response to therapy remain underexplored.