• The Influence of Ethnicity on Visual Analog Scale Pain Ratings: Pre- and Post-Radiofrequency Application for Pain of Zygapophyseal Joint Origin

      Rogg, Schuyler A; Martinez-Lu, Kianfa; Martin, Dan C; Williams, Gwendolyn O; Hammonds, William D; Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine (American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians, 2010-02)
      Increased scrutiny of the allocation of health care dollars makes the identification of factors influencing treatment outcomes important. Few studies have examined the relationship between ethnicity and the efficacy of chronic pain management interventions (as opposed to acute pain syndromes). Radiofrequency application (RFA) is a common treatment modality for pain due to zygapophyseal joint (z joint) disease. This survey reviewed the efficacy of RFA in African American (AA) and non-Hispanic Caucasian patients. This study is a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent RFA to the L3, L4 medial branch nerves, dorsal ramus of L4, and the accessory nerve from the S1 dorsal ramus to the L5-S1 z joint.
    • Plasma Membrane Disruption in Orthodontic Tooth Movement

      Orellana, Maria F.; Department of Oral Biology (2002-04)
      (Introduction) One hundred years ago, in 1900, Dr. Edward H. Angle and a dozen colleagues came together to establish dentistry's first specialty, which is known today as orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics. Orthodontics is a science and an art. It is the art o f creating healthy, beautiful smiles by moving teeth with precise, gradual force expertly applied, and the science concerned with the study o f the growth o f the craniofacial complex, the development o f occlusion and the treatment o f dentofacial abnormalities. Mechanical forces exerted on tooth roots and transmitted to the periodontal tissues initiate the remodeling activity that facilitates the movement o f teeth through bone. The specific changes in the bone surrounding the root o f an orthodontically moved tooth are characterized as resorption and deposition. Resorption o f bone is seen on the compression side o f the tooth. In contrast, bone is deposited in the tension side of the tooth that is being moved in the opposite direction. The biologic response to sustained force against the teeth is a function o f force magnitude; forces great enough to occlude blood vessels lead to pain, sterile necrosis and a process described as undermining resorption that inevitably leads to a delay in tooth movement. Lighter forces allow activation o f osteoclasts, and thus the removal of bone from the compression side by the painless process o ffrontal resorption. Clinicians face the challenge o f maintaining tissue vitality by avoiding undermining resorption, while applying forces heavy enough to produce frontal resorption. An understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that enable bone to adapt to changes in its mechanical environment is important for solving the different challenges o f clinical orthodontics. Almost a century of research has been devoted to examining this phenomenon by morphologic methods. The histologic changes have consequently been well documented, but there are many unanswered questions that must be addressed in order to explain how mechanical deformation is transduced into a desirable biologic response. The aim o f the present investigation was to characterize a novel cellular mechanism for uptake and release of molecules important in bone remodeling by periodontal ligament cells. Specifically, the plasma membrane disruption theory was examined in light o f its role in mechanotransduction in orthodontic tooth movement. These are the first studies linking the placement o f mechanical loading, as occurs in orthodontic tooth movement, with plasma membrane disruption and resealing of periodontal ligament cells. The release o f bFGF and II-ip from the cells of the periodontal ligament was also examined following application o f in vivo strain.
    • Split peroneus brevis tendon: an unusual cause of ankle pain and instability.

      Chauhan, Bindiya; Panchal, Pina; Szabo, Edward; Wilkins, Thad; Department of Family Medicine; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (2014-03)
      Tears of the peroneus brevis tendon may cause ankle pain, swelling, and instability. Supportive therapy with ankle bracing and analgesics is the mainstay of therapy, but surgical repair is often required in patients with ongoing symptoms. Surgical options include debridement, tubularization, or, in severe cases, resection of the damaged tendon and tenodesis. We describe a 64-year-old woman with a split peroneus brevis tendon presenting with lateral ankle pain, swelling, and instability, and we review the literature regarding presentation, diagnostic testing, pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and treatment recommendations. Primary care physicians should consider peroneal tendon injuries in patients with chronic lateral ankle pain and instability.
    • Type III Nrg1 Back Signaling Enhances Functional TRPV1 along Sensory Axons Contributing to Basal and Inflammatory Thermal Pain Sensation

      Canetta, Sarah E.; Luca, Edlira; Pertot, Elyse; Role, Lorna W.; Talmage, David A.; Mei, Lin; Department of Neurology; College of Graduate Studies (2011-09-20)
      Type III Nrg1, a member of the Nrg1 family of signaling proteins, is expressed in sensory neurons, where it can signal in a bi-directional manner via interactions with the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (ErbB RTKs)