• Molecular cloning and characterization of the mouse Acdp gene family.

      Wang, Cong-Yi; Yang, Ping; Shi, Jing-Da; Purohit, Sharad; Guo, Dehuang; An, Haiqian; Gu, Jian-Guo; Ling, Jennifer X; Dong, Zheng; She, Jin-Xiong; et al. (2004-05-11)
      BACKGROUND: We have recently cloned and characterized a novel gene family named ancient conserved domain protein (ACDP) in humans. To facilitate the functional study of this novel gene family, we have cloned and characterized Acdp, the mouse homologue of the human ACDP gene family. RESULTS: The four Acdp genes (Acdp1, Acdp2, Acdp3 and Acdp4) contain 3,631 bp, 3,244 bp, 2,684 bp and 2,743 bp of cDNA sequences, and encode deduced proteins of 951, 874, 713 and 771 amino acids, respectively. The mouse Acdp genes showed very strong homologies (>90%) in both nucleotide and amino acid sequences to their human counterparts. In addition, both nucleotide and amino acid sequences within the Ancient Conserved Domain (ACD) are highly conserved in many different taxonomic species. Particularly, Acdp proteins showed very strong AA homologies to the bacteria CorC protein (35% AA identity with 55% homology), which is involved in magnesium and cobalt efflux. The Acdp genes are widely expressed in all tissues tested except for Acdp1, which is only highly expressed in the brain with low levels of expression in kidney and testis. Immunostaining of Acdp1 in hippocampus neurons revealed a predominant localization on the plasma membrane. CONCLUSION: The Acdp genes are evolutionarily conserved in diverse species and ubiquitously expressed throughout development and adult tissues suggesting that Acdp may be an essential gene. Acdp showed strong homology to bacteria CorC protein and predominantly localized on the plasma membrane. These results suggest that Acdp is probably a family of proteins involved in ion transport in mammalian cells
    • ParaKMeans: Implementation of a parallelized K-means algorithm suitable for general laboratory use.

      Kraj, Piotr; Sharma, Ashok; Garge, Nikhil; Podolsky, Robert H.; McIndoe, Richard A; Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine (2008-04-28)
      BACKGROUND: During the last decade, the use of microarrays to assess the transcriptome of many biological systems has generated an enormous amount of data. A common technique used to organize and analyze microarray data is to perform cluster analysis. While many clustering algorithms have been developed, they all suffer a significant decrease in computational performance as the size of the dataset being analyzed becomes very large. For example, clustering 10000 genes from an experiment containing 200 microarrays can be quite time consuming and challenging on a desktop PC. One solution to the scalability problem of clustering algorithms is to distribute or parallelize the algorithm across multiple computers. RESULTS: The software described in this paper is a high performance multithreaded application that implements a parallelized version of the K-means Clustering algorithm. Most parallel processing applications are not accessible to the general public and require specialized software libraries (e.g. MPI) and specialized hardware configurations. The parallel nature of the application comes from the use of a web service to perform the distance calculations and cluster assignments. Here we show our parallel implementation provides significant performance gains over a wide range of datasets using as little as seven nodes. The software was written in C# and was designed in a modular fashion to provide both deployment flexibility as well as flexibility in the user interface. CONCLUSION: ParaKMeans was designed to provide the general scientific community with an easy and manageable client-server application that can be installed on a wide variety of Windows operating systems.
    • Physical interaction and functional coupling between ACDP4 and the intracellular ion chaperone COX11, an implication of the role of ACDP4 in essential metal ion transport and homeostasis.

      Guo, Dehuang; Ling, Jennifer X; Wang, Mong-Heng; She, Jin-Xiong; Gu, Jianguo; Wang, Cong-Yi; Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine; Department of Physiology (2008-01-16)
      Divalent metal ions such as copper, manganese, and cobalt are essential for cell development, differentiation, function and survival. These essential metal ions are delivered into intracellular domains as cofactors for enzymes involved in neuropeptide and neurotransmitter synthesis, superoxide metabolism, and other biological functions in a target specific fashion. Altering the homeostasis of these essential metal ions is known to connect to a number of human diseases including Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and pain. It remains unclear how these essential metal ions are delivered to intracellular targets in mammalian cells. Here we report that rat spinal cord dorsal horn neurons express ACDP4, a member of Ancient Conserved Domain Protein family. By screening a pretransformed human fetal brain cDNA library in a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified that ACDP4 specifically interacts with COX11, an intracellular metal ion chaperone. Ectopic expression of ACDP4 in HEK293 cells resulted in enhanced toxicity to metal ions including copper, manganese, and cobalt. The metal ion toxicity became more pronounced when ACDP4 and COX11 were co-expressed ectopically in HEK293 cells, suggesting a functional coupling between them. Our results indicate a role of ACDP4 in metal ion homeostasis and toxicity. This is the first report revealing a functional aspect of this ancient conserved domain protein family. We propose that ACDP is a family of transporter protein or chaperone proteins for delivering essential metal ions in different mammalian tissues. The expression of ACDP4 on spinal cord dorsal horn neurons may have implications in sensory neuron functions under physiological and pathological conditions.
    • Reduced Serum Vitamin Dâ Binding Protein Levels Are Associated With Type 1 Diabetes

      Blanton, Dustin; Han, Zhao; Bierschenk, Lindsey; Linga-Reddy, M.V. Prasad; Wang, Hongjie; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Haller, Michael; Schatz, Desmond; Myhr, Courtney; She, Jin-Xiong; et al. (2011-10-16)
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    • The Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Autoimmune-Mediated Beta-Cell Destruction in Type 1 Diabetes

      Zhong, Jixin; Rao, Xiaoquan; Xu, Jun-Fa; Yang, Ping; Wang, Cong-Yi; Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine (2012-02-14)
      Unlike type 2 diabetes which is caused by the loss of insulin sensitivity, type 1 diabetes (T1D) is manifested by the absolute deficiency of insulin secretion due to the loss of β mass by autoimmune response against β-cell self-antigens. Although significant advancement has been made in understanding the pathoetiology for type 1 diabetes, the exact mechanisms underlying autoimmune-mediated β-cell destruction, however, are yet to be fully addressed. Accumulated evidence demonstrates that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays an essential role in autoimmune-mediated β-cell destruction. There is also evidence supporting that ER stress regulates the functionality of immune cells relevant to autoimmune progression during T1D development. In this paper, we intend to address the role of ER stress in autoimmune-mediated β-cell destruction during the course of type 1 diabetes. The potential implication of ER stress in modulating autoimmune response will be also discussed. We will further dissect the possible pathways implicated in the induction of ER stress and summarize the potential mechanisms underlying ER stress for mediation of β-cell destruction. A better understanding of the role for ER stress in T1D pathoetiology would have great potential aimed at developing effective therapeutic approaches for the prevention/intervention of this devastating disorder.
    • A statistical framework for integrating two microarray data sets in differential expression analysis.

      Lai, Yinglei; Eckenrode, Sarah E; She, Jin-Xiong; Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine (2009-02-11)
      BACKGROUND: Different microarray data sets can be collected for studying the same or similar diseases. We expect to achieve a more efficient analysis of differential expression if an efficient statistical method can be developed for integrating different microarray data sets. Although many statistical methods have been proposed for data integration, the genome-wide concordance of different data sets has not been well considered in the analysis. RESULTS: Before considering data integration, it is necessary to evaluate the genome-wide concordance so that misleading results can be avoided. Based on the test results, different subsequent actions are suggested. The evaluation of genome-wide concordance and the data integration can be achieved based on the normal distribution based mixture models. CONCLUSION: The results from our simulation study suggest that misleading results can be generated if the genome-wide concordance issue is not appropriately considered. Our method provides a rigorous parametric solution. The results also show that our method is robust to certain model misspecification and is practically useful for the integrative analysis of differential expression.
    • TRPM8 mechanism of autonomic nerve response to cold in respiratory airway.

      Xing, Hong; Ling, Jennifer X; Chen, Meng; Johnson, Richard D; Tominaga, Makoto; Wang, Cong-Yi; Gu, Jianguo; Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine (2008-06-18)
      Breathing cold air without proper temperature exchange can induce strong respiratory autonomic responses including cough, airway constriction and mucosal secretion, and can exacerbate existing asthma conditions and even directly trigger an asthma attack. Vagal afferent fiber is thought to be involved in the cold-induced respiratory responses through autonomic nerve reflex. However, molecular mechanisms by which vagal afferent fibers are excited by cold remain unknown. Using retrograde labeling, immunostaining, calcium imaging, and electrophysiological recordings, here we show that a subpopulation of airway vagal afferent nerves express TRPM8 receptors and that activation of TRPM8 receptors by cold excites these airway autonomic nerves. Thus activation of TRPM8 receptors may provoke autonomic nerve reflex to increase airway resistance. This putative autonomic response may be associated with cold-induced exacerbation of asthma and other pulmonary disorders, making TRPM8 receptors a possible target for prevention of cold-associated respiratory disorders.