• 2015 Libraries Annual Report

      University Libraries (2016-06-07)
      We are pleased to provide the 2014-2015 Annual Report of the Georgia Regents University Libraries after a hiatus of a few years. This report serves to highlight the activities and accomplishments of FY15 (and also a few items from FY14) that support our mission, and to inform administrators, colleagues, and historians of our work.
    • 2016 Libraries Annual Report

      University Libraries (2016-11-03)
      We are pleased to provide the 2015-2016 Annual Report of the Augusta University Libraries.This report serves to highlight the activities and accomplishments of FY16 that support our mission and to inform administrators, colleagues, and historians of our work.
    • 2017 Libraries Annual Report

      University Libraries (2017-10-25)
      We are pleased to provide the 2016-2017 Annual Report of the Augusta University Libraries. This report serves to highlight the activities and accomplishments of FY17 that support our mission and to inform administrators, colleagues, and historians of our work.
    • 2018 Libraries Annual Report

      University Libraries (Augusta University, 2018-10-19)
      This report serves to highlight the activities and accomplishments of FY18 that support the Augusta University's mission and to inform administrators, colleagues, and historians of the University Libraries work.
    • 2018-2019 University Libraries Annual Report

      University Libraries (Augusta University, 2019-11-18)
      This report serves to highlight the activities and accomplishments of FY19 that support the Augusta University's mission and to inform administrators, colleagues, and historians of the University Libraries work.
    • 2019-2020 University Libraries Annual Report

      Kathy Davies, Interim Director of Libraries; Johnson, Melissa; University Libraries (Augusta University, 2021-02-26)
      This report serves to highlight the activities and accomplishments of FY20 that support the Augusta University's mission and to inform administrators, colleagues, and historians of the University Libraries work.
    • Access to Health Information: Outreach Efforts to Ronald McDonald House Augusta

      Bandy, Sandra L.; Brewster, Tamara; University Libraries (Georgia Regents University, 2015-10)
      Objective: The library seeks to improve the use of reliable electronic health information to fill this information need for an under-served population in crisis. In 2014, a new and larger Ronald McDonald House (RMH) opened in Augusta across a shared parking lot of the Robert B, Greenblatt, M.D. Library. Currently, there are no health information resources available in the house. The house staff/volunteers have shared that they have received questions about health information but are advised not to give medical advice. Methods: A computer designated for accessing health information and a small selection of printed materials has been made available within the RMH. The library is in position to train the RMH house staff/volunteers on consumer health resources and how to evaluate reliable web resources. This will allow them to promote authoritative health resources for families/caregivers of children who are receiving medical treatment at the Children’s Hospital of Georgia. A health information web page has been developed and is accessible through the RMH portal. This web page is also being used as a class outline for hands-on computer training sessions for RMH staff. Results: The results of the training within the past six months will be presented along with suggested improvements for the staff who are teaching caregivers how to access health information. Conclusion: Parents will do anything for their child, especially when they are sick. Often they turn to the internet searching for answers. The library recognized the potential to build a positive partnership with the community. Using our expertise to aid this under-served population will assist parents in finding authoritative and up-to-date information health information resources. This project has been funded in whole or in part with Federal funds from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under Contract No. HHS-N-276-2011-00004-C with the University of Maryland Baltimore.
    • Building a DREAM: Medical Librarians Collaborating in the Creation of an Assessment Database

      Blake, Lindsay; Davies, Kathy J; University Libraries (2014-05)
      Program Objective: The DREAM (Directory and Repository of Educational Assessment Measures) project built a repository of peer-reviewed assessment measures used in health sciences education. Program: Librarians collaborated with the school of medicine’s educational department, the Educational Innovation Institute (EII), to create a medical assessment database, DREAM. The DREAM database is hosted within the MedEdPORTAL on the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) website. Librarians tailored searches to the six main Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies. The librarians worked closely with the DREAM project coordinator to craft PubMed searches that would find a variety of assessment tools for students and residents clustered around the six competencies. The searches were combed for Psychometrically Evidenced, Appearing Repeatedly in a Literature Search (PEARLS). PEARLS were sent out to reviewers, who prepared a critical analysis. A Critical Synthesis Package, which includes librarian created indexing, is then placed on the DREAM site. Main Results: The DREAM initiative launched online officially in October 2013. The six ACGME searches will be expanded to cover the entire health sciences arena and social science databases. Librarians have become full-partners with the EII team on the DREAM project, designing not only searches, but providing feedback, participating in monthly meetings, and assisting as needed. DREAM has gained national attention and led to further Librarian involvement in projects on campus and for other organizations. Conclusion: The collaboration between the EII and the medical library is mutually beneficial. The medical librarians have gained national recognition for their inclusion in the DREAM project. The project has been presented at medical education and library conferences. Librarians are collaborating on an article with the EII DREAM team for publication in the medical education literature. Librarians have also improved on their searching skills in PubMed by expanding their knowledge of both MeSH and indexing. This has helped them to become more efficient and productive searchers.
    • Copyright Crash Course

      Mears, Kim; University Libraries (2016-09)
      This session will focus on two copyright issues of interest to educators: 1) copyright basics and the fair use guidelines that allow you to use copyrighted materials in your presentations and courses and 2) copyright and publishing. Can you decipher the terms of a copyright transfer agreement (CTA) from a journal? We will examine a CTA and breakdown the legalese. Ms. Mears provides consultations on all things copyright and open access and maintains the University Libraries' institutional repository. Her office is located on the health sciences campus at the Greenblatt Library.
    • Creating a Mosaic of History Lectures for the Health Sciences

      Bandy, Sandra L.; Sharrock, Renee; University Libraries (2016-05)
      Objective: Unlike many health sciences libraries, our library has a large and far-reaching Historical Collection and Archives (HCA) room housing hidden treasures. Showcasing this collection, and the history of the health sciences, has often been a challenge. This paper examines the development and implementation of a History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series. Method: The recent addition of historical donations from alumni and other health professionals has resulted in an increase interest in the library’s historical collections and archives. Making these collections discoverable is the primary goal. The library hosted a mosaic of lectures that focused on the library’s historical collections. Lectures have been tied to current library events and university courses. Creating this historical lecture series is a collaborative planning process which included many obstacles and creative solutions. Steps in this process include: (1) connecting historical collections with faculty or alumni to design the lecture; (2) developing marketing strategies across the health science campus that encourage attendance and interest; and (3) assessing the effectiveness of the lecture series.
    • Data Repositories For Research Reproducibility

      Davies, Kathy J; Putnam Davis, Jennifer; University Libraries
    • Evaluating an Embedded Program: Increasing Awareness, Expanding Services, and Fulfilling Patron Needs

      Ballance, Darra; Blake, Lindsay; University Libraries (2016-05)
      Introduction: Setting: Augusta University (AU), a comprehensive four-year university Nine colleges, an academic health center and over 8000 students. Campuses include the Health Sciences Campus, Undergraduate campus and Partnership Campus at the University of Georgia Three libraries (Greenblatt, Reese and the Partnership medical school) serve students, faculty and hospital staff. In 2012, Library administration, in collaboration with AU librarians, investigated a service model of librarian integration in their customers’ settings called embedded librarianship. Best practices suggested establishing office space for librarians among their designated customer groups. Once “embedded,” the librarian would become a part of customers’ daily activities and provide information support on-demand and in context. While there are descriptions of many facets of embedded librarian service, there is no comprehensive tool evaluating the activities of embedded librarians that can answer the question: how do patrons perceive the value of embedded librarian services? The embedded librarians at Augusta University sought to measure the awareness and perception of the new service model among clinicians, faculty, and students with a survey instrument. A validated instrument will assist in the proper implementation, maintenance, and evolution of an effective embedded service model.  Methods: Web-based survey, Likert scale and open-ended questions; Distributed by email in April 2015 using Qualtrics; All Augusta University students, full-time faculty, clinicians, and residents in areas where embedded librarians are assigned; Four colleges, two hospital departments, and one institute. Responses were solicited for four weeks; weekly reminder emails were sent, and the librarians personally encouraged participation from their embedded areas. The survey began by defining “embedded librarian.” Respondents who were unfamiliar with the program and unable to identify a librarian from the group were directed out of the survey.  The remaining respondents self-identified as a student, resident, clinician, or faculty member and then were routed to questions specific to their role. Students’ questions related to classwork and use of library resources; faculty questions related to teaching and research; and clinician/resident questions related to patient care and clinical training. Because most faculty also fulfill clinical roles, respondents who identified as faculty or clinician had the opportunity to answer both sets of questions. Results: The survey response rate was 10% with 381 completed forms from 4,408 survey recipients. Fifty-nine percent (59%) of respondents knew that an embedded program existed in their college or institute. 55% had worked with one or more librarians – in this question participants were asked to choose librarians by their picture and name. Of the 45% remaining, we asked why they had not had an opportunity to work with an embedded librarian. Responses indicated 1) Not aware or not known 2) Not doing research yet requiring that level of assistance, 3) have not needed one. The majority of faculty strongly agreed that embedded librarians saved them time and were an integral part of their group.  Analysis of locally collected data reveled that a high number of reference transactions occur in person which corresponds with survey results. Additional review of the data reflected an increasing trend toward librarian collaborations on grants, publications, and presentations. Conclusions: The survey suggests that perception - or how our patrons understand our role and value - may be the area needing the most improvement. To gauge perception of the program, the term “embedded librarian” was first clearly defined, then respondents were asked if they were aware that their college or department had an embedded librarian and finally to identify their embedded librarian from a photograph. It is important to note that all recipients of the survey belonged to a college or department with an embedded librarian. Of 381 responses, only 58% indicated that they were aware that their college or department had an embedded librarian, but nearly 74% were able to correctly identify their embedded librarian by photograph. This suggested that the embedded librarians were familiar faces within those colleges but there is a need to provide more education on embedded roles and services.
    • Evaluating Best Practices for Video Tutorials: A Case Study

      Weeks, Thomas; Davis, Jennifer Putnam; University Libraries (Taylor and Francis, 2017)
      This paper will explore one library’s experience creating best practices for the creation of video tutorials. First, a literature review establishes the best practices other creators have used. Then, the authors apply these best practices to the creation of their first video tutorial. Finally, they evaluate the usefulness of each practice in context. This study is helpful for all those starting to make video tutorials or reinvigorate their tutorial creation. This is an electronic version of an article published in the Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning. The final version of record is available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1533290X.2016.1232048.
    • Heritage Unit News April 2019

      Kare Flynn; Renee Sharrock; Special Collections; Historical Collections & Archives; University Libraries (Augusta University, 4/18/2019)
      Reese Library: General Library includes the collection IA.15.01.02.005, Reese Library photograph albums, 1976-2006 Greenblatt Library: RG13 Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library.
    • Heritage Unit News April 2020

      Miranda Christy; Renee Sharrock; Special Collections; Historical Collections & Archives; University Libraries (Augusta University, 4/14/2020)
      Reese Library: Our institutional archives at Reese Library hold records related to the Pamplin College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences. Within that collection (IA.01.001.002) are papers written for the classes of prolific historian Dr. Edward J. Cashin. Greenblatt Library: The record group RG04.02: Commencements consists of commencement programs and invitations for the legacy institution of the Health Sciences Campus. The earliest printed program in this collection is from 1845.
    • Heritage Unit News August 2020

      Christy, Maranda; University Libraries; Special Collections (Augusta University, 2020-08-13)
      Reese Library: The featured finding aid is “Augusta Fire Department records, 1879-1884″ (ARCHS 007) which describes records of late nineteenth century fires and associated property damage.
    • Heritage Unit News December 2018

      Kare Flynn; Renee Sharrock; Special Collections; Historical Collections & Archives; University Libraries (Augusta University, 12/18/2018)
      Reese Library: Stephen Vincent Benet's typewriter. Greenblatt Library: Eliza Phinizy McGran medicine chest.
    • Heritage Unit News February 2018

      Kare Flynn; Renee Sharrock; Special Collections; Historical Collections & Archives; University Libraries (Augusta University, 2/15/2018)
      Reese Library: Boykin Wright (1852-1932). Greenblatt Library: John Dunn Lane, Jr. graduated from the Medical College of Georgia in 1927.
    • Heritage Unit News February 2019

      Kare Flynn; Renee Sharrock; Special Collections; Historical Collections & Archives; University Libraries (Augusta University, 2/14/2019)
      Reese Library: MSS 401, the Walker family papers. The Walker family was a prominent Augusta family during the 18 and 19 centuries, and the Walker family papers document the descendants of Freeman Walker (1780-1827), who was a U.S. senator and lawyer who moved to Augusta, Georgia in 1797. Greenblatt Library: The Student Lecture Notebooks (MSS020) is an assortment of handwritten notes recorded by students. Eighteen notebooks are contained in this manuscript collection and the majority of the notebooks belonged to Medical College of Georgia students.
    • Heritage Unit News January 2018

      Kara Flynn; Renee Sharrock; Historical Collections & Archives; Special Collections; University Libraries (Augusta University, 1/17/2018)
      The oldest book in the Greenblatt Library's rare book collection is Gerald of Cremona's 1608 Latin translation of Avicenna's Canon of Medicine. Reese Library's Special Collections & Institutional Archives will be highlighting the multi-volume set of William Coxe's Travels into Poland, Russia, Sweden, and Denmark: illustrated with charts and engravings in honor of this month's focus on rare books from the Heritage Unit.