• Authentic Assessment in the Library Classroom

      Baker, Camilla B.; Reese Library (Georgia Regents University, 2013-08-23)
      Typical survey instruments used in library classrooms tend to place more emphasis on presenter performance than on student learning. The uses of teacher evaluation surveys are clear for personnel evaluative purposes. What is less clear is whether the effort expended on library instruction is worth the time invested in it, when framed in the context of student outcomes. In other words, is librarian performance in the classroom more important than student learning? The use of active learning techniques in library classrooms focuses attention on the materials at hand, often in ways that lectures and demonstrations cannot. This paper will define the attributes of authentic assessment, and explain how this type of assessment can be used in a library classroom, even a single session, once a semester, in order to put more emphasis on student learning, using the exercise itself to shape the expected student outcomes. Examination of a sample of completed student questions after such a class showed that students need more emphasis in two outcome areas, documentation and moving successfully from identification of desired items to retrieval of those items. These are areas where students often need extra assistance, but it can be challenging to provide that assistance in a single class where other outcomes also compete for both the students’ and teacher’s attention. However, a stronger focus on student learning creates a better measure of the value of the class than does a survey more suited to a performance evaluation.
    • Information Literacy/Information Architecture: Lessons Learned from a Card Sort Exercise

      Feher, Virginia; Mears, Kim; Johnson, Autumn; Reese Library (Georgia Regents University, 2013-08-23)
    • The New Normal at GRU Libraries: Managing Change/Seeking Innovation

      Feher, Virginia; Davies, Kathy J; Verburg, Fay L; McCarrell, Kyle; Mears, Kim; Reese Library (Georgia Regents University, 2013-05-16)
      On January 8th 2013, Augusta State University and Georgia Health Sciences University consolidated to form Georgia Regents University. With this consolidation, ASU Reese Library and GHSU Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library administratively combined. The two libraries serve very different user populations. Reese provides access to a broad range of information resources for undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and community users. Greenblatt provides access to evidence-based resources in support of teaching, research, and clinical care for students, faculty, community users, and the GRU Health System. As part of the consolidation process, Reese and Greenblatt faculty and staff collaborated on reconciling differences in policies, procedures, service models, collection development, and library governance, all while seeking opportunities to enhance and innovate services. In this panel presentation, Reese and Greenblatt librarians will address challenges faced in the consolidation process, including combining GIL catalogs, expanding the liaison program, planning a consolidated website, and learning how to navigate differences in organizational culture.
    • Partnering with Business Faculty for Information Literacy Instruction

      Bustos, Rod; Blocker, LouAnn; Reese Library (Augusta State University, 2012-10-12)
      Presentation given at GACOMO 2012 about partnering with business school faculty for information literacy instruction.
    • Reference for the Remote User Through Embedded Librarianship

      Connolly-Brown, Maryska; Mears, Kim; Johnson, Melissa; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library; Walter M. Bortz III Library; Reese Library; Georgia Regents University; Hampden-Sydney College (Taylor & Francis, 2016-02)
      Embedded librarians serve an important role in assisting remote users. Despite the varying degrees of embeddedness, all maintain the goal of ensuring the same high quality reference and instruction services that users have come to expect from the traditional library setting. Embedded librarians select and use technology that most effectively meets the needs of this unique user group. This technology can include the library website, course management systems, research guides, lecture and screen capture software, remote reference (including telephone, chat, and email), web conferencing, online survey tools, citation management, and social media. [NOTE: This is an electronic version of an article published in The Reference Librarian, 2016, VOL. 57, NO. 3, 165–181. This article is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02763877.2015.1131658.]
    • Tenure-Related Recommendations for Library faculty of Georgia Regents University

      Baker, Camilla B.; Davies, Kathy J; Feher, Virginia; Shipman, Peter; Verburg, Fay L; Waggoner-Angleton,Carol; Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library; Reese Library; Georgia Regents University (2012-10-08)
      The Georgia Health Sciences University (GHSU) Provost, the Vice President for Instruction and Enrollment Management and Associate Provost, and the Augusta State University Vice President for Academic Affairs are requesting the consolidated library faculty to issue recommendations on tenure for new hires and the post-tenure review expectations for the consolidated library faculty. According to the original charge, the report should compare tenure practices of the Georgia Regents University (GRU) consolidated library faculty to the tenure practices and trends of library faculty at benchmark institutions. However, the list of referent and aspirational institutions based on GRU’s potential Carnegie classification has not been finalized. This creates a challenge to identify definitive institutions with which to compare library tenure policies. The consolidated library faculty are members of the USG Corps of Instruction with faculty status and rank and are eligible for promotion. The consolidated library faculty participate in faculty governance, teaching, and scholarly activities at their respective campuses. The information provided by the consolidated libraries should inform the work of the Consolidation Promotion and Tenure Work Team. The following position paper will provide the background, assessment, and recommendations concerning tenure for library faculty in the consolidated libraries.