Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621754
Title:
Guidelines for Healthy Food Production in an Urban Brownfield: Is Aquatic Vegetation Safe for Composting?
Authors:
Barrera, Bryuanna; Greene, Rhiley; Mondeddu, Sheena
Abstract:
Sibley Mill, located in the community of Harrisburgnear Augusta University, is a designated brownfield. The property was the site of theConfederate Powder Works and later that ofa cotton mill.Soil contaminantsinclude arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium,lead and mercury.There are documented cases of children in this community with elevated blood concentrations of lead. Risks associated with lead poisoning are damage to the brain and nervous system, slowed growth and development, and behavioral problems.The benefits of urban agricultureare wellestablished, but currently there are no guidelines for safe methods of food production in brownfields. Aquatic vegetation is removed weekly from the Augusta Canal to enablehydroelectric powergenerationat Sibley Mill. We are using this vegetationto implementa novel approach for the production of compostfor raised-bed gardening.We measured the concentrations of 14 heavy metals, prior to composting, to establishbaseline data. Concentrations of barium(253.3-962.4 ppm)and lead(4.1-16.5ppm)exceed the guidelines recommended for drinking waterand are the two metals of greatest concern for the productionof safe, usablecompost.
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences; Clinical and Digital Health Sciences
Issue Date:
12-Feb-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621754
Submitted date:
26-JAN-2018 07:36PM
Type:
Poster Presentation
Description:
Presentation given at the 19th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference
Appears in Collections:
19th Annual PKP Student Research and Fine Arts Conference: Posters

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBarrera, Bryuannaen
dc.contributor.authorGreene, Rhileyen
dc.contributor.authorMondeddu, Sheenaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-12T17:19:36Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-12T17:19:36Z-
dc.date.issued2018-02-12-
dc.date.submitted26-JAN-2018 07:36PM-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621754-
dc.descriptionPresentation given at the 19th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conferenceen
dc.description.abstractSibley Mill, located in the community of Harrisburgnear Augusta University, is a designated brownfield. The property was the site of theConfederate Powder Works and later that ofa cotton mill.Soil contaminantsinclude arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium,lead and mercury.There are documented cases of children in this community with elevated blood concentrations of lead. Risks associated with lead poisoning are damage to the brain and nervous system, slowed growth and development, and behavioral problems.The benefits of urban agricultureare wellestablished, but currently there are no guidelines for safe methods of food production in brownfields. Aquatic vegetation is removed weekly from the Augusta Canal to enablehydroelectric powergenerationat Sibley Mill. We are using this vegetationto implementa novel approach for the production of compostfor raised-bed gardening.We measured the concentrations of 14 heavy metals, prior to composting, to establishbaseline data. Concentrations of barium(253.3-962.4 ppm)and lead(4.1-16.5ppm)exceed the guidelines recommended for drinking waterand are the two metals of greatest concern for the productionof safe, usablecompost.en
dc.subjecturban agricultureen
dc.subjectbrownfielden
dc.titleGuidelines for Healthy Food Production in an Urban Brownfield: Is Aquatic Vegetation Safe for Composting?en
dc.typePoster Presentationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciencesen
dc.contributor.departmentClinical and Digital Health Sciencesen
dc.contributor.sponsorWear, Donnaen
dc.contributor.sponsorDepartment of Biological Sciencesen
dc.contributor.affiliationAugusta Universityen
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