Educational attainment and self-rated health among African-Americans in Pitt County, NC

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621591
Title:
Educational attainment and self-rated health among African-Americans in Pitt County, NC
Authors:
Chandrasekar, Eeshwar; Banta, Zimo; Ragan, Kathleen; Schmitz, Michelle; James, Sherman
Abstract:
Background: To help fill the knowledge gap regarding relationships between educational attainment and self-rated health (SRH) in minority populations, we analyzed the data of a community-based cohort of African-Americans residing in Pitt County, NC, between 1988 and 2001. Methods: Data from the Pitt County Study (a community-based, longitudinal survey of risk factors for hypertension and related disorders disproportionately affecting African-Americans) were used to explore associations between educational attainment and SRH, stratified by sex, in a cohort of individuals from 1988 (n=1,773), 1993 (n=1,195), and 2001 (n=1,117) using continuous, ordinal, and binary correlated data analyses. Results: For males and females with less than a high school education, the odds of reporting poor or fair health (compared to excellent, very good, or good health) were 2.75 (95% CI: 1.54-4.91) and 1.78 (95% CI: 1.15-2.75) times greater, respectively, than among those who completed a college degree or higher. Conclusions: Across all analyses, individuals with lower educational attainment reported lower SRH scores, and the association differed by sex. Social support may be a factor in these differences. More research is needed, however, to assess relationships between educational attainment, social support, and SRH for African-Americans and other minority populations.
Affiliation:
Emory University
Publisher:
Georgia Public Health Association
Journal:
Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621591
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
jGPHA Volume 6, Number 2, Suppl 1

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChandrasekar, Eeshwaren
dc.contributor.authorBanta, Zimoen
dc.contributor.authorRagan, Kathleenen
dc.contributor.authorSchmitz, Michelleen
dc.contributor.authorJames, Shermanen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-05T21:13:46Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-05T21:13:46Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621591-
dc.description.abstractBackground: To help fill the knowledge gap regarding relationships between educational attainment and self-rated health (SRH) in minority populations, we analyzed the data of a community-based cohort of African-Americans residing in Pitt County, NC, between 1988 and 2001. Methods: Data from the Pitt County Study (a community-based, longitudinal survey of risk factors for hypertension and related disorders disproportionately affecting African-Americans) were used to explore associations between educational attainment and SRH, stratified by sex, in a cohort of individuals from 1988 (n=1,773), 1993 (n=1,195), and 2001 (n=1,117) using continuous, ordinal, and binary correlated data analyses. Results: For males and females with less than a high school education, the odds of reporting poor or fair health (compared to excellent, very good, or good health) were 2.75 (95% CI: 1.54-4.91) and 1.78 (95% CI: 1.15-2.75) times greater, respectively, than among those who completed a college degree or higher. Conclusions: Across all analyses, individuals with lower educational attainment reported lower SRH scores, and the association differed by sex. Social support may be a factor in these differences. More research is needed, however, to assess relationships between educational attainment, social support, and SRH for African-Americans and other minority populations.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGeorgia Public Health Associationen
dc.subjecteducationen
dc.subjectself-rated healthen
dc.subjectafrican americanen
dc.subjectHealth Disparitiesen
dc.titleEducational attainment and self-rated health among African-Americans in Pitt County, NCen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentEmory Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
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