Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621566
Title:
An Examination of HPV Vaccine Administration in Georgia
Authors:
Denson, Samantha; Holleran, Ericka; Gaffney, Jasmine
Abstract:
HPV is the leading STI in the US and Georgia (CDC, 2016). HPV is the necessary precursor for cervical cancer, other cancers and genital warts (CDC, 2016). Georgia is unique in that it tracks statewide vaccination rates by provider. This data is entered into the Georgia Registry of Immunization Transactions and Services (GRITS). Our goal was to use these data to examine: 1) How do HPV vaccination trends compare to other childhood vaccines? and 2) Are there gender differences in HPV vaccine uptake? Data was extracted from the GRITS database for all Georgia children aged 9-14 who received vaccines between 2009-2014. GRITS data variables were coded and descriptive analyses were conducted to examine vaccine uptake. Specifically, we examined the vaccines: HPV, pertussis, measles, mumps, rubella, and meningococcal. We also examined HPV vaccination rates by gender. Results: There was a total of 2,457,005 entries into GRITS during 2009-2014. Vaccination rates increased for HPV, meningococcal, and pertussis, but remained relatively low for rubella, mumps, and measles. Although HPV vaccine uptake started low, it had the highest uptake frequency from 2012-2014. In comparison to males, HPV vaccine uptake was higher for females across all years. However, HPV vaccine uptake for males increased more significantly than for females. The rates of childhood vaccine uptake in Georgia were relatively low for rubella, mumps, and measles. Females received the HPV4 vaccine more frequently than males. Learning more about vaccination patterns and provider recommendations will provide the necessary framework for improving HPV vaccine uptake.
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological Sciences
Issue Date:
16-Sep-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621566
Type:
Presentation
Language:
en
Description:
Presentation given at the CURS Brown Bag Seminar Series on September 16, 2016
Series/Report no.:
Fall; 2016
Sponsors:
Center for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship
Appears in Collections:
CURS Brown Bag Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDenson, Samanthaen
dc.contributor.authorHolleran, Erickaen
dc.contributor.authorGaffney, Jasmineen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-16T13:08:18Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-16T13:08:18Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621566-
dc.descriptionPresentation given at the CURS Brown Bag Seminar Series on September 16, 2016en
dc.description.abstractHPV is the leading STI in the US and Georgia (CDC, 2016). HPV is the necessary precursor for cervical cancer, other cancers and genital warts (CDC, 2016). Georgia is unique in that it tracks statewide vaccination rates by provider. This data is entered into the Georgia Registry of Immunization Transactions and Services (GRITS). Our goal was to use these data to examine: 1) How do HPV vaccination trends compare to other childhood vaccines? and 2) Are there gender differences in HPV vaccine uptake? Data was extracted from the GRITS database for all Georgia children aged 9-14 who received vaccines between 2009-2014. GRITS data variables were coded and descriptive analyses were conducted to examine vaccine uptake. Specifically, we examined the vaccines: HPV, pertussis, measles, mumps, rubella, and meningococcal. We also examined HPV vaccination rates by gender. Results: There was a total of 2,457,005 entries into GRITS during 2009-2014. Vaccination rates increased for HPV, meningococcal, and pertussis, but remained relatively low for rubella, mumps, and measles. Although HPV vaccine uptake started low, it had the highest uptake frequency from 2012-2014. In comparison to males, HPV vaccine uptake was higher for females across all years. However, HPV vaccine uptake for males increased more significantly than for females. The rates of childhood vaccine uptake in Georgia were relatively low for rubella, mumps, and measles. Females received the HPV4 vaccine more frequently than males. Learning more about vaccination patterns and provider recommendations will provide the necessary framework for improving HPV vaccine uptake.en
dc.description.sponsorshipCenter for Undergraduate Research and Scholarshipen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFallen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2016en
dc.subjectHuman papillomavirusen
dc.subjectSTIen
dc.subjectSexually Transmitted Infectionsen
dc.subjectVaccinationsen
dc.subjectGenderen
dc.titleAn Examination of HPV Vaccine Administration in Georgiaen
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychological Sciencesen
dc.description.advisorBest, Candaceen
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