Assessment of early intervention services to better child outcomes among Part C infants and toddlers

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621535
Title:
Assessment of early intervention services to better child outcomes among Part C infants and toddlers
Authors:
Ibe, Brendan; Fowles, Tiffany; Csukas, Seema; Conner, Jackie; Kelley, Grace; Johnson, Donna; Bryant, Cynthia; Allen, Michelle
Abstract:
Background: Early intervention services have been shown to improve child outcomes. Rapid proliferation of neural connections and circuits contribute to the rapid growth of the brain in the first three years of life. These neural circuits which create the foundation for learning are most flexible in this period and become increasingly more difficult to change thereafter. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between early enrollment in Georgia’s Part C birth to three early intervention program and improved child outcome ratings upon exiting the program at 3 years of age. The study used 2013 & 2014 Annual Performance Report (APR) data. Methods: This study included 6,309 participants who enrolled and received services in the Part C, Babies Can’t Wait (BCW) program. A Pearson’s correlation analysis was used to assess if there was an association between age at enrollment and improved child outcome score. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the variances within the age groups for equality. Bonferroni post hoc test was used to compare the mean child outcome score across the enrollment age groups. Results: A statistically significant inverse correlation was found between enrollment age and improved child outcome score at 3 years of age. One-way ANOVA showed that the variances within the enrollment age groups were equal while the mean child outcome scores were not. Bonferroni post hoc test revealed that the mean child outcome score in the enrollment age group 0 to ≤ 6 months was significantly higher than the other age groups. Conclusions: Significantly better child outcomes were associated with enrollment in early intervention services before 6 months of age.
Affiliation:
Georgia Department of Public Health
Publisher:
Georgia Public Health Association
Journal:
Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621535
Type:
Other
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
jGPHA Volume 6, Number 1 (2016)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIbe, Brendanen
dc.contributor.authorFowles, Tiffanyen
dc.contributor.authorCsukas, Seemaen
dc.contributor.authorConner, Jackieen
dc.contributor.authorKelley, Graceen
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Donnaen
dc.contributor.authorBryant, Cynthiaen
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Michelleen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-15T02:13:29Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-15T02:13:29Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621535-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Early intervention services have been shown to improve child outcomes. Rapid proliferation of neural connections and circuits contribute to the rapid growth of the brain in the first three years of life. These neural circuits which create the foundation for learning are most flexible in this period and become increasingly more difficult to change thereafter. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between early enrollment in Georgia’s Part C birth to three early intervention program and improved child outcome ratings upon exiting the program at 3 years of age. The study used 2013 & 2014 Annual Performance Report (APR) data. Methods: This study included 6,309 participants who enrolled and received services in the Part C, Babies Can’t Wait (BCW) program. A Pearson’s correlation analysis was used to assess if there was an association between age at enrollment and improved child outcome score. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the variances within the age groups for equality. Bonferroni post hoc test was used to compare the mean child outcome score across the enrollment age groups. Results: A statistically significant inverse correlation was found between enrollment age and improved child outcome score at 3 years of age. One-way ANOVA showed that the variances within the enrollment age groups were equal while the mean child outcome scores were not. Bonferroni post hoc test revealed that the mean child outcome score in the enrollment age group 0 to ≤ 6 months was significantly higher than the other age groups. Conclusions: Significantly better child outcomes were associated with enrollment in early intervention services before 6 months of age.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGeorgia Public Health Associationen
dc.subjectEarly Interventionen
dc.subjectLearningen
dc.subjectBehavior Therapyen
dc.subjectAnalysis of Varianceen
dc.titleAssessment of early intervention services to better child outcomes among Part C infants and toddlersen
dc.typeOtheren
dc.contributor.departmentGeorgia Department of Public Healthen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
All Items in Scholarly Commons are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.