Studying Gene Expression in Whole Embryos by in situ Hybridization: A Peer-to-Peer Laboratory Guide

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621427
Title:
Studying Gene Expression in Whole Embryos by in situ Hybridization: A Peer-to-Peer Laboratory Guide
Authors:
Kalra, Aarushi; Xia, Di
Abstract:
The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in cell to cell signaling pathways. Our goal is to provide a full laboratory guide for students to study gene expression in zebrafish embryos by in situ hybridization. Prior to our study, the laboratory had observed disorganized and shortened cilia in cells that are important for cell signaling in the pronephric duct and neural tube floor plate of the zebrafish embryo. Ciliogenesis depends on a master transcriptional regulator, foxj1a, whose mRNA expression can be monitored through in situ hybridization and microscopic imaging. Knockdown morpholino-injected, control mismatched morpholino-injected, and uninjected embryos were fixed to determine if foxj1a transcription is qualitatively affected by ECM gene knockdown. Our results showed that the knockdown embryos portrayed an inconsistent foxj1a signal strength along the length of the pronephric duct, when compared to analysis of control mismatched and wild-type uninjected embryos. We created this manuscript for other students to observe how ECM gene knockdown can affect foxj1a mRNA expression, but also to give them a guide to the tools they would need to explore their own genes of interest, in zebrafish or in many other organisms and tissues.
Advisors:
LeMosy, Ellen K.
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences
Publisher:
Augusta University Libraries
Journal:
Arsenal: Augusta University's Undergraduate Research Journal
Issue Date:
11-May-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621427
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
1; 2
Appears in Collections:
Department of Biological Sciences: Student Research and Presentations; Arsenal: Volume 1, Issue 2

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorLeMosy, Ellen K.en
dc.contributor.authorKalra, Aarushien
dc.contributor.authorXia, Dien
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-11T19:21:15Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-11T19:21:15Z-
dc.date.issued2017-05-11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621427-
dc.description.abstractThe extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in cell to cell signaling pathways. Our goal is to provide a full laboratory guide for students to study gene expression in zebrafish embryos by in situ hybridization. Prior to our study, the laboratory had observed disorganized and shortened cilia in cells that are important for cell signaling in the pronephric duct and neural tube floor plate of the zebrafish embryo. Ciliogenesis depends on a master transcriptional regulator, foxj1a, whose mRNA expression can be monitored through in situ hybridization and microscopic imaging. Knockdown morpholino-injected, control mismatched morpholino-injected, and uninjected embryos were fixed to determine if foxj1a transcription is qualitatively affected by ECM gene knockdown. Our results showed that the knockdown embryos portrayed an inconsistent foxj1a signal strength along the length of the pronephric duct, when compared to analysis of control mismatched and wild-type uninjected embryos. We created this manuscript for other students to observe how ECM gene knockdown can affect foxj1a mRNA expression, but also to give them a guide to the tools they would need to explore their own genes of interest, in zebrafish or in many other organisms and tissues.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAugusta University Librariesen
dc.relation.ispartofseries1en
dc.relation.ispartofseries2en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.titleStudying Gene Expression in Whole Embryos by in situ Hybridization: A Peer-to-Peer Laboratory Guideen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciencesen
dc.identifier.journalArsenal: Augusta University's Undergraduate Research Journalen
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