Social and behavioral implications of National Collegiate Athletic Association sickle cell trait screening: The athletes’ perspective

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621041
Title:
Social and behavioral implications of National Collegiate Athletic Association sickle cell trait screening: The athletes’ perspective
Authors:
Lawrence, H Raymona; Scott, Alison; Haywood, Carlton ( 0000-0002-3574-7871 ) ; Robinson, Kayin; Mason, Mondi
Abstract:
Background: In August 2010, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) implemented a policy mandating sickle cell trait (SCT) testing for all Division I collegiate athletes. Subsequently, all Division II-III athletes were also compelled to undergo SCT testing. This decision has met with controversy among healthcare providers, researchers, and sickle cell advocates. However, there is little information concerning the athletes’ perspective of this policy. The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a qualitative study that explored college athletes’ perceptions of sickle cell trait SCT, NCAA policies on SCT testing, and potential implications of SCT screening. Methods: The participants were eighteen male and female athletes (ages 18-24), members of NCAA-governed teams who were on the study campus from April-August 2010. Athletes participated in focus groups that gathered their perceptions of the SCT, the NCAA SCT policy, and social and behavioral implications of a SCT diagnosis. Results: Athletes lacked knowledge of the SCT and the implications of a positive screening test result, desired health education about SCT, were conflicted about sharing health information, and feared loss of playing time if found to carry the SCT. Conclusions: The study revealed athletes’ perceptions of the SCT and mandated NCAA SCT testing that should be addressed by college health professionals.
Affiliation:
Georgia Southern University, The College of William and Mary, Johns Hopkins University, University of Georgia, City and County of Denver Department of Environmental Health
Publisher:
Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association
Journal:
Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621041
Additional Links:
http://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Appears in Collections:
jGPHA Volume 5, Number 2 (2015)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLawrence, H Raymonaen
dc.contributor.authorScott, Alisonen
dc.contributor.authorHaywood, Carltonen
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Kayinen
dc.contributor.authorMason, Mondien
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-17T19:29:47Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-17T19:29:47Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621041-
dc.description.abstractBackground: In August 2010, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) implemented a policy mandating sickle cell trait (SCT) testing for all Division I collegiate athletes. Subsequently, all Division II-III athletes were also compelled to undergo SCT testing. This decision has met with controversy among healthcare providers, researchers, and sickle cell advocates. However, there is little information concerning the athletes’ perspective of this policy. The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a qualitative study that explored college athletes’ perceptions of sickle cell trait SCT, NCAA policies on SCT testing, and potential implications of SCT screening. Methods: The participants were eighteen male and female athletes (ages 18-24), members of NCAA-governed teams who were on the study campus from April-August 2010. Athletes participated in focus groups that gathered their perceptions of the SCT, the NCAA SCT policy, and social and behavioral implications of a SCT diagnosis. Results: Athletes lacked knowledge of the SCT and the implications of a positive screening test result, desired health education about SCT, were conflicted about sharing health information, and feared loss of playing time if found to carry the SCT. Conclusions: The study revealed athletes’ perceptions of the SCT and mandated NCAA SCT testing that should be addressed by college health professionals.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/en
dc.subjectNCAAen
dc.subjectsickle cell traiten
dc.subjectdiscriminationen
dc.subjecteducationen
dc.titleSocial and behavioral implications of National Collegiate Athletic Association sickle cell trait screening: The athletes’ perspectiveen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentGeorgia Southern University, The College of William and Mary, Johns Hopkins University, University of Georgia, City and County of Denver Department of Environmental Healthen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
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