Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/619028
Title:
Trends in cancer incidence rates in Georgia, 1982-2011
Authors:
Yoo, Wonsuk; Coughlin, Steven S.; Lillard, James
Abstract:
Background: Although data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End results (SEER)-affiliated cancer registry are accessible to the public, there is a shortage of published research describing cancer incidences for White, Black, and other residents in Georgia. The objective of this research is to provide an overview of the trends in incidence of cancer in Georgia. Methods: Incidence data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 9 program, supported by the National Cancer Institute, spanning the years 1982 to 2011. To assess trends over time, age-adjusted cancer incidence rates relative to the 2000 Standard US population and annual percent changes (APCs) were calculated using SEER*Stat software. Results: In Georgia, cancer incidence rates for women increased from 365.1 per 100,000 in 1982 to 404.2 per 100,000 in 2011, with an overall APC of 0.3% (95% confidence interval: 0.2 to 0.4), but, for men, cancer incidence rates showed a slight decline from 528.0 per 100,000 in 1982 to 513.7 per 100,000 in 2011 (APC of 0.2%, 95% CI: -0.6 to 0.1). For Black, White, and Other (Asian/Pacific Islanders/American Indians) females, there were increases in incidence in this period, with APC values of 0.6, 0.4, and 0.3, respectively. For all males and for Black and White males, there were overall decreases in incidence, with APC values of -0.2. For Other males, however, the APC value was -0.9. Conclusions: In Georgia, increases in cancer incidence rates occurred during 1982-2011 among the female population and within various racial groups in this population, but there was relative stability in incidence rates among the male population, except for Other males.
Publisher:
Georgia Public Health Association
Journal:
Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/619028
Additional Links:
http://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/
Language:
en_US
Appears in Collections:
jGPHA Volume 5, Number 1 (2015); jGPHA Volume 5, Number 1 (2015)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYoo, Wonsuken
dc.contributor.authorCoughlin, Steven S.en
dc.contributor.authorLillard, Jamesen
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-29T19:58:43Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-29T19:58:43Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/619028-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Although data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End results (SEER)-affiliated cancer registry are accessible to the public, there is a shortage of published research describing cancer incidences for White, Black, and other residents in Georgia. The objective of this research is to provide an overview of the trends in incidence of cancer in Georgia. Methods: Incidence data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 9 program, supported by the National Cancer Institute, spanning the years 1982 to 2011. To assess trends over time, age-adjusted cancer incidence rates relative to the 2000 Standard US population and annual percent changes (APCs) were calculated using SEER*Stat software. Results: In Georgia, cancer incidence rates for women increased from 365.1 per 100,000 in 1982 to 404.2 per 100,000 in 2011, with an overall APC of 0.3% (95% confidence interval: 0.2 to 0.4), but, for men, cancer incidence rates showed a slight decline from 528.0 per 100,000 in 1982 to 513.7 per 100,000 in 2011 (APC of 0.2%, 95% CI: -0.6 to 0.1). For Black, White, and Other (Asian/Pacific Islanders/American Indians) females, there were increases in incidence in this period, with APC values of 0.6, 0.4, and 0.3, respectively. For all males and for Black and White males, there were overall decreases in incidence, with APC values of -0.2. For Other males, however, the APC value was -0.9. Conclusions: In Georgia, increases in cancer incidence rates occurred during 1982-2011 among the female population and within various racial groups in this population, but there was relative stability in incidence rates among the male population, except for Other males.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherGeorgia Public Health Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/en
dc.subjecttrendsen
dc.subjectcancer incidence ratesen
dc.subjectSEERen
dc.subjectAPC Changesen
dc.titleTrends in cancer incidence rates in Georgia, 1982-2011en_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
dc.contributor.affiliationGeorgia Regents Universityen
dc.contributor.affiliationEmory Universityen
dc.contributor.affiliationMorehouse Collegeen
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