Impact of 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic on mortality rates in Savannah, GA, and implications for future epidemic prevention

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/618543
Title:
Impact of 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic on mortality rates in Savannah, GA, and implications for future epidemic prevention
Authors:
Plasphol, Sara; Dixon, Betty
Abstract:
Background: The Spanish Influenza pandemic struck the United States in waves from September 1918 through March 1919. This study investigates the impact of the Spanish Influenza on Savannah and Chatham County, Georgia. Methods: Primary death records from the Chatham County Health Department were examined and analyzed for the years of 1917, 1918, and 1919. Historical mortality rates in the Savannah area were compared to those for other parts of the United States and world. Results: Mortality rates attributed to the Spanish Influenza within Savannah closely paralleled similar flu-related mortality rates for comparison populations in New York, London, and Madrid. Conclusions: These local primary data enable Savannah public health officials to understand the historical trends of communicable disease mortality in relation to other parts of the world, and have the potential to serve as a reference when channeling future resources into epidemic prevention in Chatham County.
Affiliation:
Armstrong State University
Publisher:
Georgia Public Health Association
Journal:
Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/618543
Additional Links:
http://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Appears in Collections:
jGPHA Volume 5, Number 1 (2015)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPlasphol, Saraen
dc.contributor.authorDixon, Bettyen
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-18T19:52:00Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-18T19:52:00Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/618543-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The Spanish Influenza pandemic struck the United States in waves from September 1918 through March 1919. This study investigates the impact of the Spanish Influenza on Savannah and Chatham County, Georgia. Methods: Primary death records from the Chatham County Health Department were examined and analyzed for the years of 1917, 1918, and 1919. Historical mortality rates in the Savannah area were compared to those for other parts of the United States and world. Results: Mortality rates attributed to the Spanish Influenza within Savannah closely paralleled similar flu-related mortality rates for comparison populations in New York, London, and Madrid. Conclusions: These local primary data enable Savannah public health officials to understand the historical trends of communicable disease mortality in relation to other parts of the world, and have the potential to serve as a reference when channeling future resources into epidemic prevention in Chatham County.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherGeorgia Public Health Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/en
dc.subjectClostridium Infectionen
dc.subjectGeogiaen
dc.subjectHealth Resourcesen
dc.subjectNew Yorken
dc.titleImpact of 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic on mortality rates in Savannah, GA, and implications for future epidemic preventionen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentArmstrong State Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
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