The care continuum for people living with HIV in Georgia: How can we raise the bar?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/618450
Title:
The care continuum for people living with HIV in Georgia: How can we raise the bar?
Authors:
Kelly, Jane; Rane, Deppali; Wortley, Pascale; Drenzek, Cherie
Abstract:
Background: Viral suppression (VS) improves quality of life and longevity for people living with HIV (PLWH) and reduces viral transmission, but is achieved by only a minority of PLWH in Georgia Methods: By use of the Georgia HIV/AIDS surveillance database, the HIV Care Continuum was stratified by age. Results: Retention in care and VS generally increased with increasing age, with the exception of adolescents (aged 13-18 years), who had the highest retention and VS. Differences by sex, race and transmission category persisted across age groups. Among persons retained in care, the proportion achieving VS also generally increased with age. Linkage to care within 3 months of HIV diagnosis was lower among young adults (aged 19-24 years) (54%); young Black, non-Hispanic (NH) males (49%); and young Black NH men who have sex with men (MSM) (49%) as compared to those among adolescents (66%, 58%, and 57%). Conclusions: Retention in care and VS decreases with the transition from adolescence to young adulthood, possibly reflecting loss of support systems and competing priorities. At the other end of the age spectrum, health care and social support systems will be confronted with increasing numbers of older PLWH in Georgia. Challenges in HIV treatment and prevention include (a) the need for integrated medical care for aging PLWH with co-morbid conditions, and (b) the changing social environment of young PLWH.
Affiliation:
Georgia Department of Public Health
Publisher:
Georgia Public Health Association
Journal:
Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/618450
Additional Links:
http://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Appears in Collections:
jGPHA Volume 5, Number 1 (2015)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Janeen
dc.contributor.authorRane, Deppalien
dc.contributor.authorWortley, Pascaleen
dc.contributor.authorDrenzek, Cherieen
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-16T23:50:39Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-16T23:50:39Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/618450-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Viral suppression (VS) improves quality of life and longevity for people living with HIV (PLWH) and reduces viral transmission, but is achieved by only a minority of PLWH in Georgia Methods: By use of the Georgia HIV/AIDS surveillance database, the HIV Care Continuum was stratified by age. Results: Retention in care and VS generally increased with increasing age, with the exception of adolescents (aged 13-18 years), who had the highest retention and VS. Differences by sex, race and transmission category persisted across age groups. Among persons retained in care, the proportion achieving VS also generally increased with age. Linkage to care within 3 months of HIV diagnosis was lower among young adults (aged 19-24 years) (54%); young Black, non-Hispanic (NH) males (49%); and young Black NH men who have sex with men (MSM) (49%) as compared to those among adolescents (66%, 58%, and 57%). Conclusions: Retention in care and VS decreases with the transition from adolescence to young adulthood, possibly reflecting loss of support systems and competing priorities. At the other end of the age spectrum, health care and social support systems will be confronted with increasing numbers of older PLWH in Georgia. Challenges in HIV treatment and prevention include (a) the need for integrated medical care for aging PLWH with co-morbid conditions, and (b) the changing social environment of young PLWH.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherGeorgia Public Health Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/en
dc.subjectHIVen
dc.subjectViral Suppressionen
dc.subjectRetention In Careen
dc.subjectCare Continuumen
dc.titleThe care continuum for people living with HIV in Georgia: How can we raise the bar?en_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentGeorgia Department of Public Healthen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
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