Promoting policy and environmental change in faith-based organizations: Organizational level findings from a mini-grants program

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/618059
Title:
Promoting policy and environmental change in faith-based organizations: Organizational level findings from a mini-grants program
Authors:
Hermstad, April K; Arriola, Kimberly; Clair, Shauna; Honeycutt, Sally; Carvalho, Michelle; Cherry, Sabrina; Davis, Tamara; Fraizer, Sheritta; Escoffery, Cam; Kegler, Michelle C.
Abstract:
Background: High rates of heart disease, cancer, and stroke exist in rural South Georgia, where Emory’s Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network provided mini-grants and technical assistance to six faith-based organizations to implement policy and environmental changes to promote healthy eating (HE), physical activity (PA), and tobacco use prevention (TUP). Drawing from a Social Ecological Framework, we hypothesized that church members would perceive an increase in messages, programs, and the availability of facilities to support HE, PA, and TUP over a 1-year period. Methods: Members (N=258) completed self-administered questionnaires that assessed perceptions of the existing church health promotion environment relative to HE, PA, and TUP policies, as well as their eating behavior and intention to use PA facilities at church at baseline and 1-year follow-up. Results: Members at three of the six churches perceived increases in delivery of HE messages via sermons, church bulletins, and food labels, and increased availability of programs that support HE (p<0.05). Members at four churches reported increases in healthy foods served and decreased unhealthy foods served at three churches over the 1-year period (p<0.05). Of the five churches that implemented changes to promote PA, members at two churches perceived increases in healthy PA messages (p<0.05) and those at three churches perceived increased PA facilities (p<.05). One of two churches that implemented TUP policies, according to responses of members, had an increase in messages on smoking, (p<0.05). Conclusions: Community mini-grants may be a viable mechanism for promoting environmental change supporting HE, PA, and TUP policies in church environments.
Publisher:
Georgia Public Health Association
Journal:
Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/618059
Additional Links:
http://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Appears in Collections:
jGPHA Volume 5, Number 1 (2015); jGPHA Volume 5, Number 1 (2015)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHermstad, April Ken
dc.contributor.authorArriola, Kimberlyen
dc.contributor.authorClair, Shaunaen
dc.contributor.authorHoneycutt, Sallyen
dc.contributor.authorCarvalho, Michelleen
dc.contributor.authorCherry, Sabrinaen
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Tamaraen
dc.contributor.authorFraizer, Sherittaen
dc.contributor.authorEscoffery, Camen
dc.contributor.authorKegler, Michelle C.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-08T19:28:15Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-08T19:28:15Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/618059-
dc.description.abstractBackground: High rates of heart disease, cancer, and stroke exist in rural South Georgia, where Emory’s Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network provided mini-grants and technical assistance to six faith-based organizations to implement policy and environmental changes to promote healthy eating (HE), physical activity (PA), and tobacco use prevention (TUP). Drawing from a Social Ecological Framework, we hypothesized that church members would perceive an increase in messages, programs, and the availability of facilities to support HE, PA, and TUP over a 1-year period. Methods: Members (N=258) completed self-administered questionnaires that assessed perceptions of the existing church health promotion environment relative to HE, PA, and TUP policies, as well as their eating behavior and intention to use PA facilities at church at baseline and 1-year follow-up. Results: Members at three of the six churches perceived increases in delivery of HE messages via sermons, church bulletins, and food labels, and increased availability of programs that support HE (p<0.05). Members at four churches reported increases in healthy foods served and decreased unhealthy foods served at three churches over the 1-year period (p<0.05). Of the five churches that implemented changes to promote PA, members at two churches perceived increases in healthy PA messages (p<0.05) and those at three churches perceived increased PA facilities (p<.05). One of two churches that implemented TUP policies, according to responses of members, had an increase in messages on smoking, (p<0.05). Conclusions: Community mini-grants may be a viable mechanism for promoting environmental change supporting HE, PA, and TUP policies in church environments.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherGeorgia Public Health Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/en
dc.subjectFeeder Behaviouren
dc.subjectSmokingen
dc.subjectSocial Supporten
dc.subjectMotor Activityen
dc.titlePromoting policy and environmental change in faith-based organizations: Organizational level findings from a mini-grants programen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
dc.contributor.affiliationEmory Universityen
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Georgiaen
dc.contributor.affiliationAlbany State Universityen
dc.contributor.affiliationSouthwest Georgia Regional Interfaith Coalitionen
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