Tapping the “town and gown” potential for correctional health research collaborations

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/617226
Title:
Tapping the “town and gown” potential for correctional health research collaborations
Authors:
Gates, Madison L. ( 0000-0001-5677-6017 ) ; Staples-Horne, Michelle; Webb, Nancy C.; Braithwaite, Ronald; Hastings, Beverly
Abstract:
Background: Collaborations between juvenile justice systems (town) and academia (gown) promise to significantly enhance what we understand about high rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) found among detained populations, particularly African American young women. However, research related to the sexual health of adolescent detainees has not occurred in proportion to the magnitude of issues found in the population. While there are many challenges to conducting research with this population, there are also lessons learned and best practices from other studies that may provide guidance. Methods: In 2015, we implemented a pilot project with young women in a detention center to understand the association between STIs and relationship dynamics. Using a formative assessment-based approach, the team periodically compared expectations to actual milestones and outcomes. This approach has provided feedback, guidance and lessons learned that we will use to adjust our pilot project. Results: Three challenges emerged from our review: concerns related to different agendas, bureaucratic difficulties and human protection. In addressing these challenges, we identified study procedures to revise and to incorporate into future works. Conclusions: Juvenile justice and academic partnerships require extensive pre-research work to account for the many challenges to implementing and conducting projects with this population. However, “town and gown” approaches to understanding and improving the sexual health of detainees can result in a more complete assessment of these issues compared to either a solely academic or juvenile justice investigation.
Publisher:
Georgia Public Health Association
Journal:
Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/617226
Additional Links:
http://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Appears in Collections:
jGPHA Volume 5, Number 1 (2015)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGates, Madison L.en
dc.contributor.authorStaples-Horne, Michelleen
dc.contributor.authorWebb, Nancy C.en
dc.contributor.authorBraithwaite, Ronalden
dc.contributor.authorHastings, Beverlyen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-19T19:26:58Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-19T19:26:58Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/617226-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Collaborations between juvenile justice systems (town) and academia (gown) promise to significantly enhance what we understand about high rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) found among detained populations, particularly African American young women. However, research related to the sexual health of adolescent detainees has not occurred in proportion to the magnitude of issues found in the population. While there are many challenges to conducting research with this population, there are also lessons learned and best practices from other studies that may provide guidance. Methods: In 2015, we implemented a pilot project with young women in a detention center to understand the association between STIs and relationship dynamics. Using a formative assessment-based approach, the team periodically compared expectations to actual milestones and outcomes. This approach has provided feedback, guidance and lessons learned that we will use to adjust our pilot project. Results: Three challenges emerged from our review: concerns related to different agendas, bureaucratic difficulties and human protection. In addressing these challenges, we identified study procedures to revise and to incorporate into future works. Conclusions: Juvenile justice and academic partnerships require extensive pre-research work to account for the many challenges to implementing and conducting projects with this population. However, “town and gown” approaches to understanding and improving the sexual health of detainees can result in a more complete assessment of these issues compared to either a solely academic or juvenile justice investigation.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherGeorgia Public Health Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/en
dc.subjectadolescent sexual healthen
dc.subjectSTIen
dc.titleTapping the “town and gown” potential for correctional health research collaborationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
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