Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/614933
Title:
Venomous spiders of the southeastern US: An unexpected threat
Authors:
Collins, Alex; Samples, Oreta
Abstract:
Background: Environmental health specialists recommend that residents of the Southeastern US, including Georgia, have the ability to identify the three venomous spiders indigenous to this area. It is necessary to recognize the black widow, brown widow, and brown recluse spiders and to be familiar with the likely habitats of these insects and with the symptoms of bites. The primary author, who serves as an Environmental Health Specialist and is a hobbyist who works with distressed wood, frequently encounters all three of these spiders. Methods: A literature review supports the fact that these three venomous spiders are indigenous to Georgia. Results: Spiders, a common sight in rural and urban areas of Georgia, are often not considered as being especially dangerous. Three common species of spiders found in Georgia are, however, venomous. Conclusions: Recognition of spiders is particularly appropriate for the protection of food service workers, employees working in tourist accommodations, and hobbyists who routinely invade spider habitats. The evaluation of educational efforts may be assessed by the numbers of reported cases of spider bites among these populations.
Affiliation:
Fort Valley State University
Publisher:
Georgia Public Health Association
Journal:
Journal of the Georgia Public Health Association
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/614933
Additional Links:
http://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Appears in Collections:
jGPHA Volume 5, Number 1 (2015)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Alexen
dc.contributor.authorSamples, Oretaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-28T19:24:57Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-28T19:24:57Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/614933-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Environmental health specialists recommend that residents of the Southeastern US, including Georgia, have the ability to identify the three venomous spiders indigenous to this area. It is necessary to recognize the black widow, brown widow, and brown recluse spiders and to be familiar with the likely habitats of these insects and with the symptoms of bites. The primary author, who serves as an Environmental Health Specialist and is a hobbyist who works with distressed wood, frequently encounters all three of these spiders. Methods: A literature review supports the fact that these three venomous spiders are indigenous to Georgia. Results: Spiders, a common sight in rural and urban areas of Georgia, are often not considered as being especially dangerous. Three common species of spiders found in Georgia are, however, venomous. Conclusions: Recognition of spiders is particularly appropriate for the protection of food service workers, employees working in tourist accommodations, and hobbyists who routinely invade spider habitats. The evaluation of educational efforts may be assessed by the numbers of reported cases of spider bites among these populations.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherGeorgia Public Health Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.gapha.org/jgpha/jgpha-archives/en
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectBrown Recluse Spideren
dc.subjectWooden
dc.subjectSpider Bitesen
dc.titleVenomous spiders of the southeastern US: An unexpected threaten_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentFort Valley State Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Georgia Public Health Associationen
All Items in Scholarly Commons are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.