Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/601028
Title:
HPA Activation: A Comparison between Shelter and Companion Dogs
Authors:
Alexander, Khadijah; McLarnon, Sean; White, Adam
Abstract:
Cortisol is considered to be a significant indicator of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation in dogs. HPA activation is one of the most commonly used measures of stress in animal research. Saliva was used in this study as a noninvasive measure of cortisol. When dogs are entered into shelters they are exposed to many stressors that may influence their immune system and temperament, and can affect their prospects of adoption. Better understanding of stress-induced physiological changes in dogs bridges gaps in knowledge needed to improved welfare of these animals. Saliva swabs were used to collect saliva samples from 2 groups of dogs; county shelter dogs and companion dogs, to determine if there was a difference in cortisol levels between the two groups. The samples were analyzed using a cortisol immunoassay kit and a plate reader. We predict that there is a difference between the groups and that the salivary cortisol levels of the shelter dogs are higher than in the dogs kept as pets. Funding Source: Center for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences
Issue Date:
Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/601028
Type:
Other
Language:
en_US
Description:
Poster presented at the 17th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference
Appears in Collections:
17th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference: Posters

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Khadijahen
dc.contributor.authorMcLarnon, Seanen
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Adamen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-09T15:18:59Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-09T15:18:59Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/601028en
dc.descriptionPoster presented at the 17th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conferenceen
dc.description.abstractCortisol is considered to be a significant indicator of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation in dogs. HPA activation is one of the most commonly used measures of stress in animal research. Saliva was used in this study as a noninvasive measure of cortisol. When dogs are entered into shelters they are exposed to many stressors that may influence their immune system and temperament, and can affect their prospects of adoption. Better understanding of stress-induced physiological changes in dogs bridges gaps in knowledge needed to improved welfare of these animals. Saliva swabs were used to collect saliva samples from 2 groups of dogs; county shelter dogs and companion dogs, to determine if there was a difference in cortisol levels between the two groups. The samples were analyzed using a cortisol immunoassay kit and a plate reader. We predict that there is a difference between the groups and that the salivary cortisol levels of the shelter dogs are higher than in the dogs kept as pets. Funding Source: Center for Undergraduate Research and Scholarshipen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectDogsen
dc.subjectCortisolen
dc.subjectSalivaen
dc.subjectAnimal Experimentationen
dc.titleHPA Activation: A Comparison between Shelter and Companion Dogsen_US
dc.typeOtheren
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciencesen
dc.description.advisorCromer, Roberten
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