Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/601006
Title:
A 20 Year Period on The Supreme Court’s Decisions Concerning Search and Seizure
Authors:
Augustin, Rudson
Abstract:
My poster presentation will present my Honors Thesis. This thesis evaluates the past rulings of the United States Supreme Court in order to determine whether or not a shift occurred within the area of search and seizure since September 11, 2001. Fifty-six cases are used to evaluate a possible shift—28 cases pre-September 11th and 28 cases post-September 11th. Septem- ber 11th is chosen because that is when the debate between privacy and security began. The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (USA PATRIOT Act) is used to analyze the aesthetics of the ongoing debate. This research examines the directionality of the decisions based on ideology to determine if there is a shift in the court’s rulings after September 11th. A t-test is used in order to evaluate the pre- and post-September 11th cases. The differences between the two time periods indicate that there is no statistically significant difference between pre- and post-September 11th. This result matters because it demonstrates that September 11th has no noticeable effect on the Supreme Court’s rulings regarding search and seizure.
Affiliation:
Department of Political Science
Issue Date:
Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/601006
Type:
Other
Language:
en_US
Description:
Poster presented at the 17th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference
Appears in Collections:
17th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference: Posters

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAugustin, Rudsonen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-08T21:04:03Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-08T21:04:03Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/601006en
dc.descriptionPoster presented at the 17th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conferenceen
dc.description.abstractMy poster presentation will present my Honors Thesis. This thesis evaluates the past rulings of the United States Supreme Court in order to determine whether or not a shift occurred within the area of search and seizure since September 11, 2001. Fifty-six cases are used to evaluate a possible shift—28 cases pre-September 11th and 28 cases post-September 11th. Septem- ber 11th is chosen because that is when the debate between privacy and security began. The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (USA PATRIOT Act) is used to analyze the aesthetics of the ongoing debate. This research examines the directionality of the decisions based on ideology to determine if there is a shift in the court’s rulings after September 11th. A t-test is used in order to evaluate the pre- and post-September 11th cases. The differences between the two time periods indicate that there is no statistically significant difference between pre- and post-September 11th. This result matters because it demonstrates that September 11th has no noticeable effect on the Supreme Court’s rulings regarding search and seizure.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectPrivacyen
dc.subjectPATRIOT Acten
dc.subjectSupreme Court cases (New York, N.Y.)en
dc.titleA 20 Year Period on The Supreme Court’s Decisions Concerning Search and Seizureen_US
dc.typeOtheren
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Political Scienceen
dc.description.advisorHunter, Lanceen
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