Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/600979
Title:
Investigating the Role of Hob1 in Translesion Synthesis in Schizosaccharomyces Pombe
Authors:
Walton, Breana R.
Abstract:
DNA replication is essential for an organism’s survival since the organism will die if the DNA is not replicated. The damage that DNA incurs may impede the progression of the replication process. The translesion synthesis (TLS) pathway bypasses damage, allowing replication to continue. Research conducted by our collaborator at the Augusta University Cancer Center indicates that the protein Rev1 physically interacts with Bin1, a protein involved in cancer progression in mammalian cells. We hypothesize that the two genes operate in the same pathway in yeast as they do in mammalian cells, and we intend to test this genetically. We conducted a mutation assay looking for an epistatic relationship between the two genes REV1 and HOB1, the homolog of Bin1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. These data suggest that Hob1 functions with Rev1 to allow for TLS, relieving stress caused by DNA damage during replication. Funding Source: Center for Undergraduate Research & Scholarship, Department of Biological Sciences
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences
Issue Date:
Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/600979
Type:
Other
Language:
en_US
Description:
Poster presented at the 17th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference
Appears in Collections:
17th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference: Posters

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWalton, Breana R.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-08T21:19:34Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-08T21:19:34Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/600979en
dc.descriptionPoster presented at the 17th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conferenceen
dc.description.abstractDNA replication is essential for an organism’s survival since the organism will die if the DNA is not replicated. The damage that DNA incurs may impede the progression of the replication process. The translesion synthesis (TLS) pathway bypasses damage, allowing replication to continue. Research conducted by our collaborator at the Augusta University Cancer Center indicates that the protein Rev1 physically interacts with Bin1, a protein involved in cancer progression in mammalian cells. We hypothesize that the two genes operate in the same pathway in yeast as they do in mammalian cells, and we intend to test this genetically. We conducted a mutation assay looking for an epistatic relationship between the two genes REV1 and HOB1, the homolog of Bin1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. These data suggest that Hob1 functions with Rev1 to allow for TLS, relieving stress caused by DNA damage during replication. Funding Source: Center for Undergraduate Research & Scholarship, Department of Biological Sciencesen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectDNA Replicationen
dc.subjectAugusta University Cancer Centeren
dc.subjectMutationen
dc.titleInvestigating the Role of Hob1 in Translesion Synthesis in Schizosaccharomyces Pombeen_US
dc.typeOtheren
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciencesen
dc.description.advisorAbdulovic-Cul, Amyen
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