Perfluorooctanoic acid reduces viability and gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and estrogen receptor alpha in MCF-7 cells

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/583644
Title:
Perfluorooctanoic acid reduces viability and gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and estrogen receptor alpha in MCF-7 cells
Authors:
Smith, April
Abstract:
Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an endocrine disrupting compound found in food, water, clothes, and other consumer products. It is known to accumulate in the environment and can be taken up through ingestion, inhalation, or skin contact. It has a half-life of nearly four years in humans. PFOA has been shown to bind and activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which are transcription factors found in mammalian cells. PPARs regulate numerous cellular activities, including proliferation and differentiation. Several studies have suggested crosstalk between PPARs and estrogen receptors (ERs). This study aimed to examine the effects of PFOA on cell viability and on PPAR and ER gene expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The results showed a decline in cell viability after 48h of PFOA treatment. In addition, 24h of treatment with PFOA led to a significant decrease in PPARα and ERα, but not PPARβ, PPARγ, or ERβ. Begin Time: 28:30 End Time: 50:40
Affiliation:
College of Science and Mathematics
Issue Date:
9-Oct-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/583644
Additional Links:
https://lecture.gru.edu/ess/echo/presentation/f163fe4f-f659-40d7-83e8-ac5c050abc8c?ec=true
Type:
Presentation
Language:
en_US
Description:
Presentation given at the CURS Brown Bag Seminar Series on October 9, 2015
Series/Report no.:
Fall; 2015
Sponsors:
Center for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship; College of Science and Mathematics; Department of Biological Sciences
Appears in Collections:
CURS Brown Bag Presentations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Aprilen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-11T19:53:01Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-11T19:53:01Zen
dc.date.issued2015-10-09en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/583644en
dc.descriptionPresentation given at the CURS Brown Bag Seminar Series on October 9, 2015en
dc.description.abstractPerfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an endocrine disrupting compound found in food, water, clothes, and other consumer products. It is known to accumulate in the environment and can be taken up through ingestion, inhalation, or skin contact. It has a half-life of nearly four years in humans. PFOA has been shown to bind and activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which are transcription factors found in mammalian cells. PPARs regulate numerous cellular activities, including proliferation and differentiation. Several studies have suggested crosstalk between PPARs and estrogen receptors (ERs). This study aimed to examine the effects of PFOA on cell viability and on PPAR and ER gene expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The results showed a decline in cell viability after 48h of PFOA treatment. In addition, 24h of treatment with PFOA led to a significant decrease in PPARα and ERα, but not PPARβ, PPARγ, or ERβ. Begin Time: 28:30 End Time: 50:40en
dc.description.sponsorshipCenter for Undergraduate Research and Scholarship; College of Science and Mathematics; Department of Biological Sciencesen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFallen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2015en
dc.relation.urlhttps://lecture.gru.edu/ess/echo/presentation/f163fe4f-f659-40d7-83e8-ac5c050abc8c?ec=trueen
dc.subjectPeroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptorsen
dc.subjectReceptors, Estrogenen
dc.subjectBreast Neoplasmsen
dc.subjectHalf-Lifeen
dc.titlePerfluorooctanoic acid reduces viability and gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and estrogen receptor alpha in MCF-7 cellsen_US
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Science and Mathematicsen
dc.description.advisorCannon, Jenniferen
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