The Chinese Dream: The Confluence of Realism and Confucianism

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/579628
Title:
The Chinese Dream: The Confluence of Realism and Confucianism
Authors:
Laufer, Brittney
Abstract:
In 2012, Xi Jinping became General Secretary, President, and the Chairman of The Central Military Commission in China. Since his start as the head of China, Mr. Xi’s speeches have referenced a nebulous concept called the “Chinese Dream.” While the “Chinese Dream” is in the early stages of its development and realization, it still offers a glimpse of what China’s international relations will strive to become. Xi Jinping has said, “The Chinese spirit brings us together and builds our country together. To create the Chinese Dream we must unite all Chinese power. As long as we stay united, we will share the opportunity to make our dreams come true” (Moore 2013, para. 8-9). These words call to mind Confucian ideals of self-improvement, community, and cooperation; furthermore, the call for “Chinese power” brings to mind the theory of realism in international relations, which emphasizes power and strength on the international level.This thesis will argue that Xi’s “Chinese Dream” is a theme that aims to increase China’s economic and military power as a regional hegemon, to establish China’s prestige as a global power surpassing the United States, and to reaffirm the legitimacy of the state and Communist Party through Confucian-based nationalism. China’s dream will ultimately upset the current status quo, and other states need to recognize this.
Affiliation:
Department of English and Foreign Languages
Issue Date:
Dec-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/579628
Type:
Thesis
Language:
en_US
Series/Report no.:
Fall; 2014
Appears in Collections:
Honors Program Theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLaufer, Brittneyen
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-14T13:04:02Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-14T13:04:02Zen
dc.date.issued2014-12en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/579628en
dc.description.abstractIn 2012, Xi Jinping became General Secretary, President, and the Chairman of The Central Military Commission in China. Since his start as the head of China, Mr. Xi’s speeches have referenced a nebulous concept called the “Chinese Dream.” While the “Chinese Dream” is in the early stages of its development and realization, it still offers a glimpse of what China’s international relations will strive to become. Xi Jinping has said, “The Chinese spirit brings us together and builds our country together. To create the Chinese Dream we must unite all Chinese power. As long as we stay united, we will share the opportunity to make our dreams come true” (Moore 2013, para. 8-9). These words call to mind Confucian ideals of self-improvement, community, and cooperation; furthermore, the call for “Chinese power” brings to mind the theory of realism in international relations, which emphasizes power and strength on the international level.This thesis will argue that Xi’s “Chinese Dream” is a theme that aims to increase China’s economic and military power as a regional hegemon, to establish China’s prestige as a global power surpassing the United States, and to reaffirm the legitimacy of the state and Communist Party through Confucian-based nationalism. China’s dream will ultimately upset the current status quo, and other states need to recognize this.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFallen
dc.relation.ispartofseries2014en
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en
dc.subjectConfucianismen
dc.subjectRealismen
dc.subjectChinaen
dc.titleThe Chinese Dream: The Confluence of Realism and Confucianismen_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of English and Foreign Languagesen
dc.description.advisorLeightner, Jonathanen
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