An examination of telenursing: Description of the professional role and predictors of role stress, role ambiguity and role conflict

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/575461
Title:
An examination of telenursing: Description of the professional role and predictors of role stress, role ambiguity and role conflict
Authors:
Schlachta-Fairchild, Loretta M.
Abstract:
Telenursing is the use of telehealth technology to deliver nursing care and conduct nursing practice (Schlachta & Sparks, 1999). In response to the rapid adoption of telemedicine technology in healthcare organizations, telenursing is emerging as a new role, promoting discussion of licensure, malpractice, and credentialing issues within nursing. Rule stress associated with new nursing roles such as telenursing impacts individual patients and the larger healthcare organization ,causing turnover, burnout, loss of continuity of care and loss of operation expertise. As with many emerging technologies, nurses assume increasingly complex roles and responsibilities. As telemedicine proliferates, the role of nurses in participating in and improving the telemedicine process will take on more prominence. It is important to identify issues related to use and integration of telemedicine into nurses' roles to minimize role stress, encourage telenursing participation and position nursing practice to take advantage of telemedicine technologies. Using the portion of Role Theory, that relates to the impact of Role Set upon Role Strain, as a framework this was a descriptive research study that identified a current population of 796 telenurses in the U.S. , representing 40 states. From this population, 196 telenurses participated in a telephonic or an online, web-based survey during Summer 2000. The purposes were to 1) Describe a) telenurses' professional role(s) and characteristics and b) U.S. strategies for nursing competence and patient safety 2) Measure telenurses' work satisfaction and its components, and role stress and its components 3) Predict the relationship between the components of work satisfaction, individual and professional role characteristics, and role stress, role ambiguity and role conflict. Findings of the Telenursing Role Study indicated that the typical Y2K telenurse is 46 years old, has work 21 years in nursing and >6 months in her telenursing position. She has a 27% chance of being an advanced practice nurse, and has at least a baccalaureate degree, and likely a graduate degree. The typical telenurse is white, female, married, and has children. She works full-time in telenursing and makes just over $49,000 per year. Telenurses work in over 29 practice settings, including web portals, private companies and for telemedicine equipment vendors. They have a host of unique, new titles such as Bioengineering Clinical Nurse Specialist, Telehealth Project Director and Consumer Information Nurse. Telenurses experience less than average role stress, role ambiguity and role conflict. They also have the same work satisfaction as other hospital-based nurses. The most important factor contributing to telenurses' work satisfaction is autonomy. Findings of regression analysis were that education level and level of work satisfaction both predict role stress and role ambiguity in telenurses. Higher education levels of telenurses are associate with high role stress and role ambiguity. Higher levels of work satisfaction of telenurses are associate with lower role stress and role ambiguity. Role ambiguity, level of education and work satisfaction are significant predictors of role conflict in telenurses.
Affiliation:
Department of Physiological and Technological Nursing
Issue Date:
7-Nov-2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/575461
Additional Links:
http://ezproxy.augusta.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/304637363?accountid=12365
Type:
Dissertation
Appears in Collections:
Department of Physiological & Technological Nursing Theses and Dissertations; Theses and Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSchlachta-Fairchild, Loretta M.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T14:55:15Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-21T14:55:15Zen
dc.date.issued2000-11-07en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/575461-
dc.description.abstractTelenursing is the use of telehealth technology to deliver nursing care and conduct nursing practice (Schlachta & Sparks, 1999). In response to the rapid adoption of telemedicine technology in healthcare organizations, telenursing is emerging as a new role, promoting discussion of licensure, malpractice, and credentialing issues within nursing. Rule stress associated with new nursing roles such as telenursing impacts individual patients and the larger healthcare organization ,causing turnover, burnout, loss of continuity of care and loss of operation expertise. As with many emerging technologies, nurses assume increasingly complex roles and responsibilities. As telemedicine proliferates, the role of nurses in participating in and improving the telemedicine process will take on more prominence. It is important to identify issues related to use and integration of telemedicine into nurses' roles to minimize role stress, encourage telenursing participation and position nursing practice to take advantage of telemedicine technologies. Using the portion of Role Theory, that relates to the impact of Role Set upon Role Strain, as a framework this was a descriptive research study that identified a current population of 796 telenurses in the U.S. , representing 40 states. From this population, 196 telenurses participated in a telephonic or an online, web-based survey during Summer 2000. The purposes were to 1) Describe a) telenurses' professional role(s) and characteristics and b) U.S. strategies for nursing competence and patient safety 2) Measure telenurses' work satisfaction and its components, and role stress and its components 3) Predict the relationship between the components of work satisfaction, individual and professional role characteristics, and role stress, role ambiguity and role conflict. Findings of the Telenursing Role Study indicated that the typical Y2K telenurse is 46 years old, has work 21 years in nursing and >6 months in her telenursing position. She has a 27% chance of being an advanced practice nurse, and has at least a baccalaureate degree, and likely a graduate degree. The typical telenurse is white, female, married, and has children. She works full-time in telenursing and makes just over $49,000 per year. Telenurses work in over 29 practice settings, including web portals, private companies and for telemedicine equipment vendors. They have a host of unique, new titles such as Bioengineering Clinical Nurse Specialist, Telehealth Project Director and Consumer Information Nurse. Telenurses experience less than average role stress, role ambiguity and role conflict. They also have the same work satisfaction as other hospital-based nurses. The most important factor contributing to telenurses' work satisfaction is autonomy. Findings of regression analysis were that education level and level of work satisfaction both predict role stress and role ambiguity in telenurses. Higher education levels of telenurses are associate with high role stress and role ambiguity. Higher levels of work satisfaction of telenurses are associate with lower role stress and role ambiguity. Role ambiguity, level of education and work satisfaction are significant predictors of role conflict in telenurses.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://ezproxy.augusta.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/304637363?accountid=12365en
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en
dc.subjectAdvanced Practice Nursingen
dc.subjectTelenursingen
dc.subjectContinuity of Patient Careen
dc.subjectJob Satisfactionen
dc.subjectNurse's Roleen
dc.titleAn examination of telenursing: Description of the professional role and predictors of role stress, role ambiguity and role conflicten
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Physiological and Technological Nursingen
dc.description.advisorPursely-Crotteau, Suzanneen
dc.description.committeeNot Listeden
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophy with a Major in Nursingen
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