Metabolic and Performance Effects of Different Warm-up Protocols on Aerobic Exercise in Physically Active Adults

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/565787
Title:
Metabolic and Performance Effects of Different Warm-up Protocols on Aerobic Exercise in Physically Active Adults
Authors:
Blanco, Chris; Brown, Julian; James, Torrian; Mojock, Chris
Abstract:
Pre-competition warm-up (WU) routines have long been prescribed as necessary components to optimize performance in athletic contests. Although WU routines are ubiquitous prior to competition, there is limited, inconclusive evidence on the impact to performance and the research focus has been on short to moderate duration exercise (< 7 min). This project was the first to investigate the effects of WU on metabolic responses and performance during long duration endurance performance. PURPOSE: To determine the metabolic and performance effects of different warm-up (WU) protocols on high-intensity aerobic exercise in physically active adults. METHODS: In a randomized, controlled crossover protocol, qualifying participants performed a continuous, graded maximal exercise test and multiple time-to-exhaustion (TTE) performance tests. On separate days, two 10-minute WU protocols, moderate and vigorous, were performed prior to the TTE. The near-threshold TTE used varied intensity (3-min 100% of ventilatory threshold (VT) power, 1-min 110% VT) to simulate the undulations common in races. Measurements of metabolic activity were recorded by indirect calorimetry. RESULTS: Physically active men (age: 24 ± 2.5 yr; body fat: 15.9 ± 6.51 %; VO2max: 40.2 ± 10.41 ml/kg/min; VT: 69.9 ± 0.72 %) were able to maintain high-intensity aerobic exercise longer (TTE increase: 8.05 ± 9.93 min) following a moderate vs. a vigorous warm-up protocol. CONCLUSION: The moderate intensity warm-up was more effective than a vigorous warm-up to increase time to exhaustion prior to high intensity aerobic exercise. Further research is needed to determine the metabolic and neuromuscular changes that contribute to the difference in performance.
Affiliation:
College of Education
Issue Date:
10-Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/565787
Type:
Presentation
Description:
Poster presentation given at the 2015 CURS Summer Scholars Symposium
Sponsors:
Office of the Provost, VP for Academic and Faculty Affairs, Office of Research
Appears in Collections:
Summer Scholars Program

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBlanco, Chrisen
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Julianen
dc.contributor.authorJames, Torrianen
dc.contributor.authorMojock, Chrisen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-10T22:48:21Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-10T22:48:21Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08-10en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/565787en
dc.descriptionPoster presentation given at the 2015 CURS Summer Scholars Symposiumen
dc.description.abstractPre-competition warm-up (WU) routines have long been prescribed as necessary components to optimize performance in athletic contests. Although WU routines are ubiquitous prior to competition, there is limited, inconclusive evidence on the impact to performance and the research focus has been on short to moderate duration exercise (< 7 min). This project was the first to investigate the effects of WU on metabolic responses and performance during long duration endurance performance. PURPOSE: To determine the metabolic and performance effects of different warm-up (WU) protocols on high-intensity aerobic exercise in physically active adults. METHODS: In a randomized, controlled crossover protocol, qualifying participants performed a continuous, graded maximal exercise test and multiple time-to-exhaustion (TTE) performance tests. On separate days, two 10-minute WU protocols, moderate and vigorous, were performed prior to the TTE. The near-threshold TTE used varied intensity (3-min 100% of ventilatory threshold (VT) power, 1-min 110% VT) to simulate the undulations common in races. Measurements of metabolic activity were recorded by indirect calorimetry. RESULTS: Physically active men (age: 24 ± 2.5 yr; body fat: 15.9 ± 6.51 %; VO2max: 40.2 ± 10.41 ml/kg/min; VT: 69.9 ± 0.72 %) were able to maintain high-intensity aerobic exercise longer (TTE increase: 8.05 ± 9.93 min) following a moderate vs. a vigorous warm-up protocol. CONCLUSION: The moderate intensity warm-up was more effective than a vigorous warm-up to increase time to exhaustion prior to high intensity aerobic exercise. Further research is needed to determine the metabolic and neuromuscular changes that contribute to the difference in performance.en
dc.description.sponsorshipOffice of the Provost, VP for Academic and Faculty Affairs, Office of Researchen
dc.subjectExerciseen
dc.subjectwarm-upen
dc.titleMetabolic and Performance Effects of Different Warm-up Protocols on Aerobic Exercise in Physically Active Adultsen
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Educationen
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