Adolescent Women's Perception of Individual and Partner HPV Risk

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/565687
Title:
Adolescent Women's Perception of Individual and Partner HPV Risk
Authors:
Best, Candace; Couba, Edison; Norviel, Anne; Rogers, Katie; Gaffney, Jasmine
Abstract:
Introduction: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common STI in the U.S. (MMWR, 2014). HPV has been implicated as the necessary precursor for cervical cancer and it has been associated with other cancers and genital warts (Chaturvedi, 2010). The most promising HPV prevention strategy is the 3-dose HPV vaccine which is recommended for adolescent males and females ages 9-26. Currently, HPV vaccination rates remain unacceptably low. We were interested in how young women perceived their HPV risk and their partner’s HPV risk. We also examined whether perceptions of risk changed after young women were provided with information about HPV and HPV infection. Methods: As part of a larger study, participants included 27 African American heterosexual young women (ages 14-17). Participants met with an interviewer once for approximately 2.5 hours. During the interview, participants were asked about their probability of having and transmitting HPV to a potential partner. Participants were then asked about their probability of their partner having and transmitting HPV to them. Next, participants received in-depth information about HPV and HPV infection. They were again asked about their individual and perceived partner risk of having and transmitting HPV. Results: Young women were more likely to report transmitting HPV post HPV information. Young women also displayed a significant bias that their partner had and would transmit HPV, pre and post HPV information. Conclusion: Education about HPV risk and infection will continue to be an important component to informing adolescents of their HPV risk and potentially increasing HPV vaccination rates.
Affiliation:
College of Science and Mathematics
Issue Date:
7-Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/565687
Type:
Presentation
Language:
en_US
Description:
This poster presentation was given at the 2015 CURS Summer Scholars Symposium
Sponsors:
Office of the Provost, VP for Academic and Faculty Affairs, Office of Research
Appears in Collections:
Summer Scholars Program

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBest, Candaceen
dc.contributor.authorCouba, Edisonen
dc.contributor.authorNorviel, Anneen
dc.contributor.authorRogers, Katieen
dc.contributor.authorGaffney, Jasmineen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-06T23:55:22Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-06T23:55:22Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08-07en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/565687en
dc.descriptionThis poster presentation was given at the 2015 CURS Summer Scholars Symposiumen
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common STI in the U.S. (MMWR, 2014). HPV has been implicated as the necessary precursor for cervical cancer and it has been associated with other cancers and genital warts (Chaturvedi, 2010). The most promising HPV prevention strategy is the 3-dose HPV vaccine which is recommended for adolescent males and females ages 9-26. Currently, HPV vaccination rates remain unacceptably low. We were interested in how young women perceived their HPV risk and their partner’s HPV risk. We also examined whether perceptions of risk changed after young women were provided with information about HPV and HPV infection. Methods: As part of a larger study, participants included 27 African American heterosexual young women (ages 14-17). Participants met with an interviewer once for approximately 2.5 hours. During the interview, participants were asked about their probability of having and transmitting HPV to a potential partner. Participants were then asked about their probability of their partner having and transmitting HPV to them. Next, participants received in-depth information about HPV and HPV infection. They were again asked about their individual and perceived partner risk of having and transmitting HPV. Results: Young women were more likely to report transmitting HPV post HPV information. Young women also displayed a significant bias that their partner had and would transmit HPV, pre and post HPV information. Conclusion: Education about HPV risk and infection will continue to be an important component to informing adolescents of their HPV risk and potentially increasing HPV vaccination rates.en
dc.description.sponsorshipOffice of the Provost, VP for Academic and Faculty Affairs, Office of Researchen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectHPV Virusen
dc.subjectWomenen
dc.titleAdolescent Women's Perception of Individual and Partner HPV Risken_US
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Science and Mathematicsen
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