Characterization of the Retinal Phenotype In Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Reductase (Mthfr) Deficient Mice, A Model Of Mild Hyperhomocysteinemia

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/559194
Title:
Characterization of the Retinal Phenotype In Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Reductase (Mthfr) Deficient Mice, A Model Of Mild Hyperhomocysteinemia
Authors:
Markand, Shanu
Abstract:
(First Paragraph) The visual system is the primary source by which information is acquired by the human brain (Fernald, 1997). The eye is the organ responsible for vision. Blindness is a devastating condition as it affects the quality of life severely. In addition, there are financial consequences associated with blindness. Most untreatable disorders of vision that lead to blindness are due to disorders/degeneration of the retina. Retina is the photosensitive layer of the eye responsible for vision (Young et al, 2006). Several factors: genetic, environmental, systemic disease have been explored in the pathophysiology of various retinal disorders. One factor implicated in retinal diseases is excess levels of the amino acid homocysteine (hcy) (Selhub et al, 1999). The purpose of these studies was to analyze the expression of Cbs and Mthfr, key enzymes of hcy pathways in the mouse retina and to characterize the retinal phenotype in Mthfr deficient mice. To lay the foundation for this thesis, this introduction is organized in the following way: The eye, retina and retinal in-vivo diagnostics are described first. This is followed by description of hcy metabolism and its association with retinal diseases and mitochondrial dysfunction as a possible mechanism of hyperhomocysteinemia (Hhcy)-mediated retinal damage.
Affiliation:
Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy
Issue Date:
May-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/559194
Additional Links:
http://ezproxy.gru.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1734473129?accountid=12365
Type:
Dissertation
Appears in Collections:
Theses and Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMarkand, Shanuen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-07T19:23:52Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-07T19:23:52Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/559194en
dc.description.abstract(First Paragraph) The visual system is the primary source by which information is acquired by the human brain (Fernald, 1997). The eye is the organ responsible for vision. Blindness is a devastating condition as it affects the quality of life severely. In addition, there are financial consequences associated with blindness. Most untreatable disorders of vision that lead to blindness are due to disorders/degeneration of the retina. Retina is the photosensitive layer of the eye responsible for vision (Young et al, 2006). Several factors: genetic, environmental, systemic disease have been explored in the pathophysiology of various retinal disorders. One factor implicated in retinal diseases is excess levels of the amino acid homocysteine (hcy) (Selhub et al, 1999). The purpose of these studies was to analyze the expression of Cbs and Mthfr, key enzymes of hcy pathways in the mouse retina and to characterize the retinal phenotype in Mthfr deficient mice. To lay the foundation for this thesis, this introduction is organized in the following way: The eye, retina and retinal in-vivo diagnostics are described first. This is followed by description of hcy metabolism and its association with retinal diseases and mitochondrial dysfunction as a possible mechanism of hyperhomocysteinemia (Hhcy)-mediated retinal damage.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://ezproxy.gru.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1734473129?accountid=12365en
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en
dc.subjecthomocysteineen
dc.subjectMTHFRen
dc.subjectRetinaen
dc.subjectHhcyen
dc.subjectrd8en
dc.titleCharacterization of the Retinal Phenotype In Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Reductase (Mthfr) Deficient Mice, A Model Of Mild Hyperhomocysteinemiaen
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Cellular Biology and Anatomyen
dc.description.advisorSmith, Sylvia B.en
dc.description.committeeGanapathy, Vadivel; Prasad, Puttur; Martin, Pamela; Saul, Alanen
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en
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