Neuro-vascular Communication in the Hypothalamic Supraoptic Nucleus in Rats. Do nitric oxide and vasopressin play a role?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/558542
Title:
Neuro-vascular Communication in the Hypothalamic Supraoptic Nucleus in Rats. Do nitric oxide and vasopressin play a role?
Authors:
Du, Wenting
Abstract:
The classical model of neurovascular coupling (NVC) proposes that activity-dependent synaptically released glutamate dilates arterioles. However, whether this model is also applicable to brain areas that use less conventional neurotransmitters, such as neuropeptides, is currently unknown. To this end, we studied NVC in the hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory system (MNS) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), in which dendritically released vasopressin (VP) can be found. Bath-applied VP significantly constricted SON arterioles via activation of the V ia receptor subtype. Vasoconstriction was also observed in response to single VP neuronal stimulation, an effect prevented by V ia receptor blockade (V2255). Conversely, osmotically-driven magnocellular neurosecretory neuronal population activity leads to a predominant nitric oxide (NO)- mediated vasodilation. Activity-dependent vasodilation was followed by a VP-mediated vasoconstriction, which acted to reset vascular tone. Taken together, our results unveiled a unique and complex form of NVC in the MNS, supporting a competitive balance between activity-dependent dendritic released VP and NO, in the generation of proper NVC responses.
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology
Issue Date:
Mar-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/558542
Additional Links:
http://ezproxy.gru.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1672681607?accountid=12365
Type:
Dissertation
Appears in Collections:
Theses and Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDu, Wentingen
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-26T02:19:39Zen
dc.date.available2015-06-26T02:19:39Zen
dc.date.issued2015-03en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/558542en
dc.description.abstractThe classical model of neurovascular coupling (NVC) proposes that activity-dependent synaptically released glutamate dilates arterioles. However, whether this model is also applicable to brain areas that use less conventional neurotransmitters, such as neuropeptides, is currently unknown. To this end, we studied NVC in the hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory system (MNS) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), in which dendritically released vasopressin (VP) can be found. Bath-applied VP significantly constricted SON arterioles via activation of the V ia receptor subtype. Vasoconstriction was also observed in response to single VP neuronal stimulation, an effect prevented by V ia receptor blockade (V2255). Conversely, osmotically-driven magnocellular neurosecretory neuronal population activity leads to a predominant nitric oxide (NO)- mediated vasodilation. Activity-dependent vasodilation was followed by a VP-mediated vasoconstriction, which acted to reset vascular tone. Taken together, our results unveiled a unique and complex form of NVC in the MNS, supporting a competitive balance between activity-dependent dendritic released VP and NO, in the generation of proper NVC responses.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://ezproxy.gru.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1672681607?accountid=12365en
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en
dc.subjectVasopressinen
dc.subjectNitric Oxideen
dc.subjectArterioleen
dc.subjectNeurovascularen
dc.subjectHypothalamusen
dc.titleNeuro-vascular Communication in the Hypothalamic Supraoptic Nucleus in Rats. Do nitric oxide and vasopressin play a role?en
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Physiologyen
dc.description.advisorFilosa, Jessica A.en
dc.description.committeeStern, Javier E.; Ergul, Adviye; Sergei, Kirov; Mumm, Javieren
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en
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