A Grounded Theory Study o f Pain Management Behaviors in Nurses Caring for Preverbal Children

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/552907
Title:
A Grounded Theory Study o f Pain Management Behaviors in Nurses Caring for Preverbal Children
Authors:
Noviello, Sheri R.
Abstract:
A qualitative study using the grounded theory method was used to explore factors that affect nurses’ pain management decision-making when caring for children between the ages o f 0 and 3 years. This study was approved by the Human Assurance Committee at Medical College o f Georgia prior to the collection of data. The sample consisted of eleven nurses who were employed at three different hospitals in the southeastern part of the United States. Theoretical sampling was the basis for the selection o f participants after the first two interviews. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and were subjected to open and axial coding. The constant comparative method was used during data analysis to identify a core category and related concepts. The basic social process that emerged is engaging in tactics o f pain management. This process contained two other processes: assessing fo r pain and managing a pain episode. Intrinsic factors that affected assessing fo r pain included knowing the territory, personal attributes o f the registered nurse (RN), being a parent, and being connected. Extrinsic factors that affected engaging in tactics o f pain management included workload and culture o f the hospital. The process of managing a pain episode included five phases: eliminating other sources o f discomfort, judging pain, comforting, medicating, and letting go.
Affiliation:
Department of Biobehavioral Nursing
Issue Date:
May-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/552907
Additional Links:
http://ezproxy.gru.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/304954685?accountid=12365
Type:
Dissertation
Appears in Collections:
Theses and Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNoviello, Sheri R.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-14T23:53:53Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-14T23:53:53Zen
dc.date.issued2006-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/552907en
dc.description.abstractA qualitative study using the grounded theory method was used to explore factors that affect nurses’ pain management decision-making when caring for children between the ages o f 0 and 3 years. This study was approved by the Human Assurance Committee at Medical College o f Georgia prior to the collection of data. The sample consisted of eleven nurses who were employed at three different hospitals in the southeastern part of the United States. Theoretical sampling was the basis for the selection o f participants after the first two interviews. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and were subjected to open and axial coding. The constant comparative method was used during data analysis to identify a core category and related concepts. The basic social process that emerged is engaging in tactics o f pain management. This process contained two other processes: assessing fo r pain and managing a pain episode. Intrinsic factors that affected assessing fo r pain included knowing the territory, personal attributes o f the registered nurse (RN), being a parent, and being connected. Extrinsic factors that affected engaging in tactics o f pain management included workload and culture o f the hospital. The process of managing a pain episode included five phases: eliminating other sources o f discomfort, judging pain, comforting, medicating, and letting go.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://ezproxy.gru.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/304954685?accountid=12365en
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en
dc.subjectPain Managementen
dc.subjectPediatricsen
dc.subjectGrounded Theoryen
dc.titleA Grounded Theory Study o f Pain Management Behaviors in Nurses Caring for Preverbal Childrenen
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biobehavioral Nursingen
dc.description.advisorBunting, Sheilaen
dc.description.committeeNot Listeden
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en
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