Effect of Homocysteine on Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cell Function

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/346572
Title:
Effect of Homocysteine on Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cell Function
Authors:
Jin, Liming
Abstract:
Hypothesis: In hyperhomocyst(e)inemic states, oxidative stress resulting from elevation of homocyste(e)ine levels leads to a decrease in L-arginine transport activity and a decrease in intracellular L-arginine availability. This will in turn limit NO production and increase superoxide production from eNOS. Therefore, the oxidative stress will be increased in endothelial cells, which may eventually lead to endothelial dysfunction and predispose to atherothrombosis. SPECIFIC AIMS 1. Characterize the cationic amino acid transport systems in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). 2. Examine the effect of HCY on L-arginine transport over time. 3. Determine the influence of oxidative stress, which is produced by HCY, on L-arginine transport. 4. Determine the effect of HCY on endothelial cell membrane potential. 5. Determine effect of HCY on expression of the transport protein CAT-1. 6. Determine the effect of HCY on eNOS activity, eNOS protein levels and NO formation. 7. Determine the effect of HCY on the production of 3-nitro-tyrosine, a marker for production of peroxynitrite. 8 . Determine the effect of HCY on vascular responses to acetylcholine.
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Issue Date:
May-2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/346572
Additional Links:
http://ezproxy.gru.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/250658672?accountid=12365
Type:
Dissertation
Appears in Collections:
Theses and Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJin, Limingen
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-13T02:39:39Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-13T02:39:39Zen
dc.date.issued2001-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/346572en
dc.description.abstractHypothesis: In hyperhomocyst(e)inemic states, oxidative stress resulting from elevation of homocyste(e)ine levels leads to a decrease in L-arginine transport activity and a decrease in intracellular L-arginine availability. This will in turn limit NO production and increase superoxide production from eNOS. Therefore, the oxidative stress will be increased in endothelial cells, which may eventually lead to endothelial dysfunction and predispose to atherothrombosis. SPECIFIC AIMS 1. Characterize the cationic amino acid transport systems in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). 2. Examine the effect of HCY on L-arginine transport over time. 3. Determine the influence of oxidative stress, which is produced by HCY, on L-arginine transport. 4. Determine the effect of HCY on endothelial cell membrane potential. 5. Determine effect of HCY on expression of the transport protein CAT-1. 6. Determine the effect of HCY on eNOS activity, eNOS protein levels and NO formation. 7. Determine the effect of HCY on the production of 3-nitro-tyrosine, a marker for production of peroxynitrite. 8 . Determine the effect of HCY on vascular responses to acetylcholine.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://ezproxy.gru.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/250658672?accountid=12365en
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en
dc.subjecteNOSen
dc.subjectNOen
dc.subjectCationic Amino Acid Transport Systemsen
dc.subjectBovine Aortic Endothelial Cellsen
dc.subjectHCYen
dc.subjectL-arginineen
dc.subjectEndothelial Cell Membrane Potentialen
dc.subjectTransport Protein Cat-1en
dc.subject3-nitro-tyrosineen
dc.subjectperoxynitriteen
dc.subjectVascular Responseen
dc.titleEffect of Homocysteine on Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cell Functionen
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pharmacology and Toxicologyen
dc.description.advisorCaldwell, Robert W.en
dc.description.committeeCaldwell, Ruth B.; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Venema, Richard C.; Carrier, Gerald O.en
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en
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