Cancer Stressors and Protective Factors: Predictors of Stress Experienced During Treatment for Childhood Cancer

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/346133
Title:
Cancer Stressors and Protective Factors: Predictors of Stress Experienced During Treatment for Childhood Cancer
Authors:
Hockenberry-Eaton, Marilyn
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to evaluate cancer stressors and protective factors as predictors of stress experienced during treatment for childhood cancer. The conceptual framework evolved from the stress and coping literature and childhood cancer research. A convenience sample of 44 children between 6 ½ and 13 ½ years of age receiving treatment for cancer were evaluated during two clinic visits. Protective factors included the child’s self-perception, coping strategies, perceived social support, and family environment. Cancer stressors include acute stressors represented by the type of treatment received during two clinical visits. Chronic stressors were evaluated by the child’s perception of stressors related to the cancer experience. Responses to stressors were assessed by physiologic and psychologic indicators of stress. Physiologic measures include epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol measures of urine and psychologic measures of state and trait anxiety. No significant differences were found in the physiologic or psychologic response to stressors in relation to the type of treatment received during either clinic visit. Epinephrine and norepinephrine were elevated for children during both clinic visits. Stepwise multiple regression analyses revealed that family expressiveness and the child’s perceived global self-worth were the best predictors of epinephrine levels. Family activities and recreation and family intellectual cultural orientation were the best predictors of state anxiety. The intensity of chronic cancer stressors, family activities and recreation, family intellectual cultural orientation, the child’s perception of physical appearance, and presence of family conflict had the greatest effect of trait anxiety. This study is the first to examine the child’s perception of chronic cancer stressors and protective factors associated with treatment for cancer. The findings provide insight into the importance of the interactions among the nature of the stressor, perceptual meaning of the stressor, and physiologic and psychologic responses to stressors that may affect long-term adjustment to childhood cancer.
Affiliation:
Not Listed
Issue Date:
May-1992
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/346133
Additional Links:
http://ezproxy.augusta.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/304034080?accountid=12365
Type:
Dissertation
Appears in Collections:
Theses and Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHockenberry-Eaton, Marilynen
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-04T02:38:22Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-04T02:38:22Zen
dc.date.issued1992-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/346133-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to evaluate cancer stressors and protective factors as predictors of stress experienced during treatment for childhood cancer. The conceptual framework evolved from the stress and coping literature and childhood cancer research. A convenience sample of 44 children between 6 ½ and 13 ½ years of age receiving treatment for cancer were evaluated during two clinic visits. Protective factors included the child’s self-perception, coping strategies, perceived social support, and family environment. Cancer stressors include acute stressors represented by the type of treatment received during two clinical visits. Chronic stressors were evaluated by the child’s perception of stressors related to the cancer experience. Responses to stressors were assessed by physiologic and psychologic indicators of stress. Physiologic measures include epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol measures of urine and psychologic measures of state and trait anxiety. No significant differences were found in the physiologic or psychologic response to stressors in relation to the type of treatment received during either clinic visit. Epinephrine and norepinephrine were elevated for children during both clinic visits. Stepwise multiple regression analyses revealed that family expressiveness and the child’s perceived global self-worth were the best predictors of epinephrine levels. Family activities and recreation and family intellectual cultural orientation were the best predictors of state anxiety. The intensity of chronic cancer stressors, family activities and recreation, family intellectual cultural orientation, the child’s perception of physical appearance, and presence of family conflict had the greatest effect of trait anxiety. This study is the first to examine the child’s perception of chronic cancer stressors and protective factors associated with treatment for cancer. The findings provide insight into the importance of the interactions among the nature of the stressor, perceptual meaning of the stressor, and physiologic and psychologic responses to stressors that may affect long-term adjustment to childhood cancer.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://ezproxy.augusta.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/304034080?accountid=12365en
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en
dc.subjectchildhood canceren
dc.subjectStressen
dc.subjectcatecholaminesen
dc.subjectcortisolen
dc.subjectAnxietyen
dc.subjectCoping Strategiesen
dc.subjectSocial Supporten
dc.subjectSelf-Perceptionen
dc.subjectFamilyen
dc.titleCancer Stressors and Protective Factors: Predictors of Stress Experienced During Treatment for Childhood Canceren
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentNot Listeden
dc.description.advisorKemp, Virginiaen
dc.description.committeeMcCranie, Ed; Lillis, Patricia; Killeen, Maureenen
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en
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