Transformation from Informal Community Group to Community-Based Health Care Organization: A Case Study of Change

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/346130
Title:
Transformation from Informal Community Group to Community-Based Health Care Organization: A Case Study of Change
Authors:
Hanson, Glenda F
Abstract:
The purpose o f this study was to examine the transformations of the organization, AID Atlanta in it’s first ten years to determine how and why decisions were made which lead from an informal community group to the creation of the successful, viable, community-based health care organization. Case study methodology was used to conduct the investigation. Sources o f data included primary and secondary documents, direct observations, and systematic interviewing. The theoretical framework for this study was the theory of dissipative structures, as developed by Prigogine (1976) and others within the fields of biology and chemistry. A number o f social scientists have applied this theory to the study of organizational change and transformation. The theory conceptualizes organizations as open systems that exchange energy with the environment, are self determining, and self organizing. Change is conceived as a normal response to an uncertain and complex environment. The study found that AID Atlanta underwent a series o f changes and transformations which enabled it to grow, survive and remain viable. Forces influencing the organization came from both the internal and external environment, with the most powerful force being the AIDS epidemic. Decisions were made by numerous individuals which served to shape the success o f the organization. The clear and constant mission of the organization was a positive sustaining force, and the development of linkages to the community was a key factor in securing necessary resources. Implications o f the study are that decision makers in community-based health care organizations must expect and prepare for change. Knowledge of the experiences of similar successful organizations may lead the administrator to develop strategies which may serve to promote their own success. Strategies shown to promote viability in this study included an open exchange with the internal and external environments, a willingness to change, the use of resources from external connections, articulation o f a vision based on the mission, knowledgeable and experienced leaders, and a strong foundation and heritage.
Affiliation:
Not Listed
Issue Date:
Mar-1996
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/346130
Additional Links:
http://ezproxy.augusta.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/304328298?accountid=12365
Type:
Dissertation
Appears in Collections:
Theses and Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHanson, Glenda Fen
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-03T22:11:14Zen
dc.date.available2015-03-03T22:11:14Zen
dc.date.issued1996-03en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/346130-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose o f this study was to examine the transformations of the organization, AID Atlanta in it’s first ten years to determine how and why decisions were made which lead from an informal community group to the creation of the successful, viable, community-based health care organization. Case study methodology was used to conduct the investigation. Sources o f data included primary and secondary documents, direct observations, and systematic interviewing. The theoretical framework for this study was the theory of dissipative structures, as developed by Prigogine (1976) and others within the fields of biology and chemistry. A number o f social scientists have applied this theory to the study of organizational change and transformation. The theory conceptualizes organizations as open systems that exchange energy with the environment, are self determining, and self organizing. Change is conceived as a normal response to an uncertain and complex environment. The study found that AID Atlanta underwent a series o f changes and transformations which enabled it to grow, survive and remain viable. Forces influencing the organization came from both the internal and external environment, with the most powerful force being the AIDS epidemic. Decisions were made by numerous individuals which served to shape the success o f the organization. The clear and constant mission of the organization was a positive sustaining force, and the development of linkages to the community was a key factor in securing necessary resources. Implications o f the study are that decision makers in community-based health care organizations must expect and prepare for change. Knowledge of the experiences of similar successful organizations may lead the administrator to develop strategies which may serve to promote their own success. Strategies shown to promote viability in this study included an open exchange with the internal and external environments, a willingness to change, the use of resources from external connections, articulation o f a vision based on the mission, knowledgeable and experienced leaders, and a strong foundation and heritage.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://ezproxy.augusta.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/304328298?accountid=12365en
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en
dc.subjectCommunity-Based Health Care Organizationen
dc.subjectTransformationsen
dc.subjectAIDSen
dc.subjectNursing Administrationen
dc.titleTransformation from Informal Community Group to Community-Based Health Care Organization: A Case Study of Changeen
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentNot Listeden
dc.description.advisorLowenstein, Arleneen
dc.description.committeeNot Listeden
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)en
All Items in Scholarly Commons are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.