Caring for Their Mothers: The Experiences, Self-Care Practices, and Cultural Influences of African American Women Caregivers

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/344458
Title:
Caring for Their Mothers: The Experiences, Self-Care Practices, and Cultural Influences of African American Women Caregivers
Authors:
Chappell, Harriet E. H.
Abstract:
The growth of minority older populations has created an increased need for African American family caregivers. African American women are at increased risk when the demands of caregiving are added to their existing health disparities. The purpose of this study was to understand the caregiving experiences of African American women, their ability to provide selfcare, and the influences of the African American culture on caregiving. Qualitative description was used to study 12 African American women caring for their mothers. Themes extrapolated from the data were commitment to care, self-care by the daughter caregivers, and the difficult times. An integrated pattern was also identified: Influences of African American Culture on caregiving. African American daughter caregivers have a profound commitment to provide the care needed by their mothers. The daughter caregivers’ self-care was balanced within and impacted by the demands and stresses of caregiving. The African American culture embodied expectations for daughter caregivers to provide care but also facilitated sources of support and strength.
Affiliation:
Department of Physiological and Technological Nursing
Issue Date:
Jul-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/344458
Additional Links:
http://ezproxy.augusta.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/304783603?accountid=12365
Type:
Dissertation
Appears in Collections:
Department of Physiological & Technological Nursing Theses and Dissertations; Theses and Dissertations

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChappell, Harriet E. H.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-13T20:48:45Z-
dc.date.available2015-02-13T20:48:45Z-
dc.date.issued2007-07-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/344458-
dc.description.abstractThe growth of minority older populations has created an increased need for African American family caregivers. African American women are at increased risk when the demands of caregiving are added to their existing health disparities. The purpose of this study was to understand the caregiving experiences of African American women, their ability to provide selfcare, and the influences of the African American culture on caregiving. Qualitative description was used to study 12 African American women caring for their mothers. Themes extrapolated from the data were commitment to care, self-care by the daughter caregivers, and the difficult times. An integrated pattern was also identified: Influences of African American Culture on caregiving. African American daughter caregivers have a profound commitment to provide the care needed by their mothers. The daughter caregivers’ self-care was balanced within and impacted by the demands and stresses of caregiving. The African American culture embodied expectations for daughter caregivers to provide care but also facilitated sources of support and strength.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://ezproxy.augusta.edu/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/304783603?accountid=12365en
dc.rightsCopyright protected. Unauthorized reproduction or use beyond the exceptions granted by the Fair Use clause of U.S. Copyright law may violate federal law.en
dc.subjectFamily caregiversen
dc.subjectAfrican American Womenen
dc.subjectSelf-careen
dc.titleCaring for Their Mothers: The Experiences, Self-Care Practices, and Cultural Influences of African American Women Caregiversen
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Physiological and Technological Nursingen
dc.description.advisorBoyle, Joyceen; Bunting, Sheliaen
dc.description.committeeFick, Donna; Quinn, Mary E.; Bennett, Geralden
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophy with a Major in Nursingen
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